Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet2/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38

1

Introduction: 

Theory and Methodology

As  a  newcomer to  the  western  field  of anthropology  and ethnography,  I became 

overwhelmed with the complex,  diverse,  ambiguous,  and  fluid nature  of anthropological 

theories and approaches applied to human subjects.

In  the  1980’s,  Eric  Hobsbawm  and  Terence  Ranger’s  new  concept  of  “the 

invention  of  tradition”1  called  anthropologists  to  explore  “the  politics  of  culture”  in 

postcolonial  nation  states.  It maintains  that the  so-called  “old traditions”  invented  in  the 

19th  and  20th  century  Europe  and  argues  that  many  of  those  “traditions”  are  “actually 

invented, constructed and formally instituted.”2

Nicholas  Thomas  raises  an  important  issue  in  his  attempt  to  define  the  goal  of 

writing  about culture:  “The  most  vital questions  to  address  are  perhaps  not:  what do  we 

need  to  preserve  or  defend  in  particular  disciplinary  frameworks?  Or,  what  are  the 

respective  strengths  of  anthropology  and  cultural  studies?  But:  who  are  we  writing  or 

creating representations  for?  And  what  do  we  want  to  tell  them?”3  Then  there  are  other 

scholars,  like  Lewellen,  who  opposes  the  “degree  of postmodernist  rejectionism.”  He  is 

critical of postmodernism’s “unique” ability to reject all the  grand theories, but its failure 

to  validate  its  statements.  According  to  Lewellen,  “A  reader  has  the  right  to  ask  of any

1  The Invention o f Tradition. Ed. Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger. Cambridge:  Cambridge Universty 

Press,  1983.

2 Ibid., p.  1.

3  Nicholas  Thomas,  “Becoming  Undisciplined:  Anthropology  and  Cultural  Studies,”  In:  Anthropological 

Theory  Today.  Edited  by  Henrietta  L.  Moore.  Cambridge,  UK:  Polity  Press;  Malden,  MA:  Blackwell 

Publishers,  1999, p. 277.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2

non-fiction  text,  “Why  should  I  believe  this?  What  are  the  criteria  by  which  I  should 

judge this to be true than what others say on this subject?”4 He further states:

Each  country  or region  or even  community  has  its  own  dynamics,  which 

are  unique  combinations  of  the  traditional,  the  national,  and  the  global. 

Although  postmodernism  may  critique  Western  domination,  and  its 

relativistic  philosophy has  been  amenable  to  many Third World  scholars, 

it was not developed to deal with some postmodern conditions in the Third 

World. As a result, there is no reason to privilege postmodern theories.5

Theorizing is still an ongoing process in postmodern anthropology. Therefore, the 

validity  of  many  current  theories  in  most  scholarly  fields,  including  postmodernist 

anthropology,  may last until the  world/earth  and the  peoples  and  societies  that inhabit it 

experience  another  major  geo-political  and  cultural  change.  Kyrgyz  epic  singers,  as 

thinkers  of  their  time,  have  long  realized  change  as  a  natural  phenomenon  and  thus 

approached  their  subject,  i.e.,  the  study  of  oral  history,  through  epic  poems  such  as 

Manas:

Mountains fell apart, turning into ravines,

Ravines shook, turning into mountains.

Many seas became extinct 

Leaving only their names behind.

Every fifty years, people were new,

Every hundred years the earth was renewed.

Studying a society and its culture, especially that of the “Others” and putting their

knowledge in a theoretical framework and finally representing them to the other “Others”

i.e., the foreign audience, is indeed a very complex and difficult task.  By reading some of



4  Lewellen,  Ted  C.  The  Anthropology  o f Globalization.  Cultural  Anthropology  Enters  the  21st  Century. 

Wesport, Connecticut, London:  Bergin & Garvey,  2002, p. 47.

5 Ibid., p. 40.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3

the  key  works  written by  western  anthropologists  about  other cultures,  I learned  first  of 

all how the western mind and thinking works in general and sees other cultures.

In  my research,  I was  faced with the  dilemma how to  approach and interpret my 

subject of study, the Kyrgyz nomadic culture.  Should I repudiate, as some postmodernists 

suggest, the  study of culture  as being whole  and homogenous in  favor of “ethnographies 

of particular”?  As  a native  scholar,  who  has  received her academic  training  in  the West, 

how  do  I  approach  my  native  culture?  What  is  my  position  as  author  and  my  goal  in 

representing  some  socio-cultural  aspects  of the  society in  which  I grew up?  Should I do 

my best to convince my readers about the validity of my statements and claims?

It  is  my  personal  opinion  that  ethnographers  should  not  look  for  cultural  issues 

and  problems  which  are  foreign  or  have  little  significance  to  the  local  people.  Those 

“ethnographies  of  particular”  or  individuals,  who  do  not  quite  conform  to  or  fit  into 

his/her  traditional  society,  may  find  more  value  and  appreciation  in  western  society, 

because  the  main  target  for  many  ethnographic  works  is  the  western  readership  As 

implied earlier,  throughout  its  history,  western  anthropology employed many theoretical 

and  methodological  approaches  and  changes  in  studying  other  cultures.  Western 

ethnographic writings passed through their traditional trend or “process of othering” other 

native  cultures  and  now  it  seems  to  search  for  new,  more  “humane”  methods  which 

would not  necessarily represent  other culture  as being  different  from the  western  world. 

This approach,  in my opinion, is irrelevant and artificial. We can and should still portray 

other peoples and their cultures as being different or “strange” if they are indeed so.  It is 

our obligation as intellectuals and scholars not just to identify our differences, but also to 

explain  them  within  their  contexts  and  finally  teach  our  readers  to  respect  and  tolerate

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


4

those cultural  and religious differences.  In other words, it is  not right to pick and choose 

those  issues,  which  mostly  interest  the  western  audience  in  the  name  of  subverting  the 

“process of othering.”

I  also  believe  that  society  and  its  social  structure  are  never  static,  but  rather  in 

constant  change  as  well  as  continuity.  However,  the  results  of my  research  in  Kizll-Jar 

did not fully confirm the idea of non-existence of coherent and whole  societies. The case 

of the  Kyrgyz people  in  Ki'zil-Jar  shows that representatives  of one  particular culture,  in 

this case the formerly nomadic culture can exist in  “stable equilibrium”  and thus create a 

“concept  of culture”  or “cultural  whole”.  I personally was not  interested in  studying  the 

ethnography of a particular family or person  within  the  Kyrgyz  society.  What interested 

me the most was to explain to my western audience,  “the others,” why certain traditional 

customs  among  the  Kyrgyz,  are  resistant  to  changes  that  are  coming  from  outside,  e.g., 

from Islam.  At the  same time,  my work highlights the differences within  Kyrgyz  society 

and  discusses  a  field  of  discourse  or  conversation  in  which  people  disagree  with  each 

other, but within a framework where they understand the disagreements. In other words, I 

address  not  only  why  do  certain  funeral  rituals  persist,  but  why  are  there  Islamists  and 

Tengirists and how do these opposing groups of intellectuals argue with each other.

In my view,  studies that are done by some foreign researchers tend to reflect those 

cultural  values  and concepts  of which he/she  is  a bearer.  Most ethnographers  who  study 

other  cultures  are  from  developed  western  countries  and  societies  where  individualism 

and  individual  rights  are  more  valued  and  respected  than  those  of  the  society.  The 

concepts of traditional culture and ideas of collective or communal identity or communal 

interests in general have negative connotations in the west.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


5

During my interview, I asked a Kyrgyz intellectual, Choyun Omuraliev,6 whether 

there is such a thing called “Kyrgyz traditional society” today. He gave the following 

interesting answer:

Yes, there is.  However,  in the west,  people  see  it  [tradition]  as  a negative 

concept. They also consider nomads and nomadism as being negative. It is 

because  the  concept  of  tradition  comes  from  the  ancient  Greeks.  In 

Greece,  tradition  did  not  reach  its  classical  form  but  remained  in  its 

primitive  state  because  they  introduced human  rights,  law  and civil  state. 

Therefore,  in  their view,  tradition  still  remains  primitive,  whereas,  in  our 

society,  tradition  has  been  filtered  and  modified  during  the  course  of 

thousands of years and only the pure,  golden stem remained thus reaching 

the  highest  peak  of  morality.  When  westerners  think  of  a  traditional 

society,  they imagine the ancient Greek society and automatically copy its 

image  to  our  society.  They  mostly  see  and  explain  tradition  in  their  own 

way with no wish to understanding what we have inside.

The term for “tradition” in Kyrgyz is salt, which also means “custom.” Like many 

other peoples in the world, the Kyrgyz did not have the understanding of the concept of a 

“traditional  society”  when  referring  to  their  own  society  and  culture.  This  concept  is 

known  among  Kyrgyz  scholars  only.  Ordinary  Kyrgyz  did  not  and  do  not  question  the 

negative  or  positive  sides  of  salt.  Unlike  in  the  west,  the  term  salt  has  a  positive 

connotation  in  most  contexts.  Whenever,  the  Kyrgyz,  especially  the  elderly  and 

intellectuals,  talk  about  their  salt,  they  stress  that  traditions  and  customs  need  to  be 

preserved, for they are full of wisdom and lessons for life.

I could not  apply the approach of “ethnographies of particular”  suggested by Lila 

Abu-Lughod7  to  my  study  of  Kyrgyz  nomadic  culture.  If  I  had  done  ten  or  thirty



6 Choyun Omuraliev is an independent journalist and writer and also the author o f the book called 

Tengirchilik (1991).  See Chapter 6 for a detailed discussion o f his theory and analysis o f the ancient 

worldview o f Tengirchilik.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



6

“ethnographies  of  particular”  or  individuals  among  the  Kyrgyz,  I  would  have  end  up 

getting similar results on traditional customs and religious values. My approach definitely 

conformed cohesion  and homogeneity.  There was  less  “chaos”  and more cohesion in the 

life of the Kyrgyz people living in Kizil-Jar.  And it is those customs and values to which 

the majority of the Kyrgyz conform that I wanted to address and analyze in my research.



7 Abu-Lughod, Lila,  “Writing Against Culture” in Recapturing Anthropology:  Working in the Present. 

Richard Fox, ed.  Sante Fe:  School o f American Research Press,  1991.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



Chapter I: 

“Fieldwork” in the Native “Field”

7

By  putting  an  exclusive  focus  on  the  object(s)  of  study,  which  are  people,  the 

traditional practice  and discipline of anthropology had underestimated the  significance of 

the  role  and  status  of  the  person  conducting  the  study,  the  researcher.  Today,  the 

postmodern  approach  and  methodology  of  fieldwork  strongly  encourages  or  “requires” 

from  anthropologists  that  they  identify  their  status  and  position  clearly  to  the  people 

under study,  and write explicitly about their fieldwork experiences, especially when they 

conduct  their  work  in  so-called  “indigenous”  or  “native”  cultures.  Modern 

anthropologists  openly  share  their  personal  accounts  of  their  experiences  in  foreign 

communities,  talk  about  the  process  of  adjustment  to  another  culture,  and  discuss  the 

ethical  and  pragmatic  challenges  of  conducting  ethnographic  fieldwork.  In  short,  an 

anthropologist  tells  his/her audience  ’’what it means  to be an  anthropologist.”8  This  new 

ethnographic  approach,  called  “reflexive  writing,”  enables  the  reader to  get  a  fuller  and 

more intimate picture of the fieldwork experience, of what it took for the author to gather 

the  necessary  materials.  In  other  words,  scholars  have  recognized  the  fact  that  the 

fieldworker's position makes a difference in what is written and how.

About two decades ago, the practice of ethnography was the task of mainly western 

anthropologists,  today,  as  cultural  anthropology  enters  the  21st  century,  the  age  of 



globalization,  western  anthropologists  are  sharing  human  subjects,  still  largely  dealing 

with  non-western  societies,  with  their  native  colleagues.  However,  since  the  field  of



8  Women in the Field. Anthropological Experiences. 2nd edition. Ed. by Peggy Goldie. Berkeley, Los 

Angeles, London:  University o f California Press,  1986, p. 4.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



8

anthropology  as  an  academic  discipline  was  founded  in  the  West,  western 

anthropological  theories,  fieldwork  approaches,  and methodologies  still  play  a dominant 

role  in  anthropological  world  scholarship.  This  draws  native  anthropologists  to  western 

institutions, where they receive their academic training in anthropology, and then conduct 

their  fieldwork  in  their  own  cultures.  As  a  result  of this  anthropological  globalization, 

several  terms  have been coined in regard to the  status  and identity of fieldworkers,  such 

as  “outsider,”  “insider,”  “foreign,”  “western,”  “native,”  and “halfie,”  or “hybrid.”  Some 

native  scholars  question  and  challenge  some  of  the  western  approaches  and 

methodologies applied to non-western cultures and societies. There are disagreements not 

only between the two groups, native and western, but also within each group as to whose 

account is  more  authentic.  The presence of non-western anthropologists  has  opened up a 

dialogue of various viewpoints by people from both sides of the divide.

All  fieldworkers,  native  and  non-native  alike,  share  one  common  feature:  “The 

research  worker  is  not  just  an  average  representative  of  his  culture;  he  has  a  unique 

personality  of his  own by  which his  description  will be colored, just  as  it is  affected by 

his  general  cultural  conditioning.”  9  In  another  words,  the  researcher’s  description  is 

similar to a painting in which one  sees the painter’s  “self portrait”  or “self projection.”10 

Like  romantics  and  realists,  both  native  and  foreign  anthropologists  also  have  different 

personalities, minds, and tastes, which affect their description or interpretation of another



9 Ibid., p. 9.

10 Op.cit.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



9

culture.  However,  it  is  said  that  even  a realist  person  will  present  “a  slanted picture”  of 

the people/culture by transporting some of his personality.11

As mentioned earlier, postmodern anthropology recognizes the significance of the 

researcher’s  personality,  status  and  identity  in  the  practice  of  ethnography.  As  Peggy 

Goldie notes:  “There is a need for more open speculation and consideration of such issues 

as:  how  were  my  data  affected by the kind  of person  I  am, by my  sex  or other apparent 

attributes,  and how did my presence  alter,  positively or negatively,  the  flux of life under

19

observation?”  It needs to be added that the researcher’s  ability to speak the language of 



the  people  with  whom  he/she  is  working  with  is  the  utmost  requirement.  One  always 

needs  to  question  the  quality  of  the  information  gathered  through  interpreters.  The 

researcher’s personality is also very important in acquiring their trust or distrust.  It is also 

a challenge for an outsider, whose behavioral manners and thinking have solidified in his 

or  her  own  culture,  to  fit  into  a  foreign  culture.  The  western  view,  understanding,  and 

experience of a non-western culture and society will differ to a large extent from that of a 

native  scholar.  We  learn  this  when  reading  personal  accounts  describing  the  socio­

cultural  experiences  of  western  scholars  who  conduct  their  fieldwork  in  far  away  and 

strange  “fields.”  American anthropologists  admit the fact that outsider fieldworkers  “can 

never  become  or  go  native.”  During  their  fieldwork,  many  foreign  fieldworkers 

symbolically go through  a process generally known  as  “culture  shock,”  a term coined by 

Ruth Benedict. Culture shock is described as a “syndrome precipitated by the anxiety that 

results  from  losing  all  your  familiar  signs  and  symbols  of social  intercourse.”13  Native

11  Op.cit.

12  Women in  the Field, p. 5.

13 Ibid., p.  11

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



10

researchers  do  not  necessarily  experience  these  negative  experiences  during  their 

fieldwork in  their own  society.  Unfortunately,  the  majority of American  anthropologists 

conduct  their  fieldwork  in  other  countries  with  very  little  or  with  no  knowledge  of the 

local people’s  language  and  work  with questionable  interpreters  usually  native  speakers 

living on the fringe of their own society.

Another  difference  in  the  approach  of  native  and  foreign  anthropologists  to  the 

study of culture is that native scholars mostly focus on their people’s folk traditions. This 

is often interpreted by the outsider anthropologists  as evidence  of “nationalism.”  Native 

anthropologists are believed to be interested in the “propaganda mission of showing their 

culture to the world,  and as such are much more interested in showing off their epics than 

their  systems  of marriage  relations.”14  For  many  native  scholars  and  for  their  societies, 

however,  marriage  and  gender  are  considered  to  be  common  issues  found  in  every 

society, but the cultural uniqueness of “backward” societies can be found in the art of oral 

creativity as, e.g., in epic songs and traditional poetry.

Western  theories,  methodologies  and  approaches  do  not  always  work  for 

understanding non-westemers  and their cultures.  A Maori  scholar, Linda Tuhiwai  Smith, 

eloquently and powerfully critiques the dominant research methodologies and approaches 

to  so-called  “indigenous”  peoples  and  their  cultures,  and  proposes  a  valuable  research 

agenda for indigenous  scholars.  Like  the Estonian  scholar Tasnas  Hofer,  she  argues  that 

Western education inhibits indigenous  scholars from writing from a “real”  or indigenous 

point  of view.  If  they  do  write  from  a  traditional  point  of view,  they  are  criticized  as



14 Notes from Stevan Harrell, Anthropologist at the University  o f Washington,  Seattle

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



11

being  “naive,”  “nativist,”  or  “illogical.” 15  There  should  not  be  just  one  (Western) 

approach  dominating  any  academic  field,  especially  not  the  study  of  mankind.  Unlike 

outsiders, many insider or native scholars cannot easily detach themselves from their own 

people  or  society  and  Western/American  scholars  can  also  not  detach  themselves  from 

their  own  society. 

But  even  though  many  “indigenous,”  or  “native”  peoples  are 

physically no longer living in the colonial world, the psychological legacy of colonialism 

has  not  yet  disappeared.  Western  scholarship  needs  to  understand  these  important 

variables  and  give  enough  space  for  native  scholars  to  voice  their  views  and 

interpretations freely.

The Term “Fieldwork”

Before  discussing  my  own  identity  as  a  native  researcher  or  “fieldworker,”  I 

would like to discuss briefly the very Western concept of “fieldwork.”  Although modem 

anthropologists  live  and  write  their  ethnographic  works  in  the  post-colonial  world,  the 

legacy of colonialist anthropology survived in its essential practice of “fieldwork.” Many 

anthropologists  agree  that  the  term  “fieldwork”  itself reflects  the  old  traditional  western 

and  colonialist  mentality  and  attitude  towards  non-westem  peoples  and  their  lands. 

Fieldwork  is  still  carried  out  largely by  anthropologists  and  sociologists  from the  West, 

and mostly targeted towards non-westem societies and cultures. Like many scholars, I not 

only  find  the  term  to  be  obsolete,  but  also  disrespectful  of  and  discriminatory  towards 

non-westem  human  subjects.  To  be  specific,  for  me  the  word  “field”  connotes  the  idea 

and  image  of  a  wild  and  uninhabited  place.  To  say  that  a  “fieldworker  conducts  or




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling