Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet34/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38

348

Summary

The findings of this dissertation work are mainly based on the eighteen months of 

ethnographic  research  that  I  conducted  in  my  hometown  KMl-Jar  (formerly  known  as 

KMl-Jar sovkhoz,  state  farm)  during the  years  2002-2003.  However,  as  a  native  scholar 

and  representative  of  Kyrgyz  [nomadic]  society  and  culture,  I  also  made  use  of  my 

knowledge and personal experiences acquired in my early childhood and youth. As I have 

noted,  I  grew  up  in  a  family  of nomadid  herders  and  interacted  with  both  sides  of my 

parents’  tribesmen (Ogotur and Aginay) who have practiced pastoral nomadism for many 

centuries. My unique and rich childhood experience of nomadic life and culture played an 

important  role  in  forming  of  my  identity.  This  close  attachment  to  Kyrgyz  traditional 

values,  customs,  and  the  art  of  oral  creativity  is  definitely  reflected  in  my  scholarly 

approach  to  and  treatment  of  Kyrgyz  nomadic  heritage  and  its  significance  in  the 

formation  of  Kyrgyz  national  identity  and  the  future  development  of  ideology  as  an 

independent nation state.

My  thesis  deals  with  three  major  issues,  which  have  current  significance  in 

contemporary Central Asia:  Kyrgyz  (and Kazakh) nomadic customs, Islamic revival,  and 

the emergence of a new national ideology, Tengirchilik.

Scholars  have  made  general  comparative  studies  of historical  nomadic-sedentary 

interaction  between  various  Turco-Mongol  tribal  confederations  and  sedentary  societies 

such  as  Chinina  Persia,  and  Russia.  However,  they  have  paied  less  attention  to  this 

interaction’s  legacy  in  shaping  modem  ethnic/national  identities  and  ethno-cultural 

boundaries.  Therefore,  as  a  classical  example  of nomad-sedentary  interaction  in  Central 

Asia,  I  chose  to  examine  the  dynamics  of  identity  formation  between  the  two  ethnic

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3 49

groups,  the  formerly nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  the  sedentary  Uzbeks.  In  order to  understand 

what it means to be a Kyrgyz for the Kyrgyz  and Uzbek for the Uzbeks, it was important 

to put the issue in historical context of nomadic-sedentary interaction.

Instead  of  dismissing  some  of the  popular  socio-cultural  stereotypes  created  by 

the  nomadic  Kyrgyz  (and  Kazakhs)  about  the  sedentary  Uzbeks,  historically  known  as 

Sarts,  I  tried  to  examine  the  dynamics  of  their  identity  formation  and  conditions  that 

created those ethno-cultural boundaries.  One of the best examples, which tell us about the 

formation of early nomadic identity as opposed to the sedentary identity, is the 8th century 

Kultegin Inscription left by the nomadic  Turks themselves.  As the earliest native written 

source,  the  Inscription  contains  very  interesting  and  valuable  material  about  the  Turkic 

and  Chinese  interaction  and  the  native  worldview  of the  Turkic  peoples,  including  the 

Kyrgyz, before the adoption and influence of other religions such as Islam.

Almost all the cultural distinctions between the two groups—such as Kyrgyz tribal 

identity  vs.  Uzbeks  regional  identity,  Kyrgyz  character  or  mentality  vs.  that  of  the 

Uzbeks,  food  and  hospitality,  women’s  roles  and  different  degrees  of Islamic  practice— 

grew  out  of  ecological  boundaries  or  “structural  oppositions.”  A  number  of  popular 

sayings among the Kyrgyz (and Kazakhs) about the Uzbeks’  (Sarts’) mentality, character, 

and  hospitality  contain  interesting  and  valuable  information  that  helps  us  to  understand 

what kind  of human virtues  and religious beliefs  were  valued in  Central  Asian  nomadic 

society and why.

The islamization of Central  Asian nomadic peoples  did not occur in  one  century; 

it was a long, gradual process.  It was mainly Sufism, the mystical branch of Islam, which 

was welcomed  in  Central  Asia,  especially by the  nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs.  One  of

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


350

the  reasons  that  Sufism  was  quite  popular  is  that  it  was  tolerant  of the  local  un-Islamic 

beliefs  and  practices.  Central  Asians  developed  a  distinct  form  of  musulmanchilik,  or 

Muslimness by assimilating some of the main Islamic  and Sufi beliefs and practices with 

their pre-Islamic  worldview.  The  latter,  which,  until  very recently,  had been  incorrectly 

called  “shamanism,”  seems  to  have  found  a  new  and  proper  name,  Tengirchilik,  coined 

by  Central  Asian  native  scholars  and  intellectuals.  The  coexistence  of Islamic/Sufi  and 

Tengirchilik  beliefs  and  practices  has  been  one  of the  reasons  for  calling  the  nomadic 

Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  “nominal  Muslims.”  The  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  are  not  likely to be 

offended  if they  are  called  nominal  Muslims,  for  they  are  themselves  aware  of the  fact 

that  they  do  not  observe  Islam  as  strictly  as  in  other  Muslim  countries.  Some  of  the 

common  Islamic  practices  can be  seen  at  those  “formal”  rituals  and  ceremonies  such  as 

rites of passage,  (e.g.,  circumcision,  marriage,  funeral  rites,  etc.).  In  Islamic  culture,  the 

person should be buried within twenty-four hours after his/her death, but the Kazakhs and 

the Kyrgyz do not obey this rule.  They at least keep the body one day,  in some cases for 

two days until close family members arrive.  Also, sharia forbids the  slaughtering of any 

animal for a funeral, but among the Kazakhs  and Kyrgyz this rule  is totally ignored.  It is 

mandatory to  slaughter  a horse  at  a funeral  among the  Kazakh  and  Kyrgyz,  whereas  the 

Uzbeks  do  not  kill  any  animal  and  bury  their  deceased  within  twenty  four  hours.  Such 

“violations”  of Islamic  sharia  can be  explained by  the  earlier stated theory,  i.e.,  that the 

Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  did  not  adopt  Islam  as  it was,  but  “filtered  new,  external  elements 

through  their  own  cultural  norms  and  aspirations.”398  In  other  words,  many  “suitable” 

Islamic practices, which did not contradict with their local traditional values, were easily

398

 See Chapter 4, p.  151.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



351

adopted  and  practiced.  The  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakh  “nomadic  mentality”  cannot  obey  the 

dogmatic  or  strict  religious  rules  that  orthodox  Islam  requires  from  its  sedentary 

believers. The historical nomadic life and nomad-sedentary interaction are gone, but their 

legacies  continue  to  influence the  everyday interaction  between  the  modem  Kyrgyz  and 

Uzbek  societies.  The  reason  for  that,  as  the  advocates  of Tengirchilik  also  point  out,  is 

their pre-Islamic  worldview  and  values  that  “have  deeply  penetrated  into  the  blood”  of 

the  Kazaks  and Kyrgyz,  who turned their religious beliefs and values into their lifestyle. 

As  the  Kyrgyz  intellectuals  themselves  admit,  they  are  not  inventing  a  new  religion, 

which  they  call  Tengirchilik,  but,  as  educators  and  intellectuals,  are  reminding  their 

people  of  their  past  heritage.  Or  as  the  title  of  one  of  Dastan  Sarigulov’s  small 

publications  states,  intellectuals  believe  that  the  “Ignorance  of  the  Descendants  Will 

Destroy the Future and Erase the Past.”

In sum, Central Asian Islam or Muslimness among the formerly nomadic Kazakhs 

and  Kyrgyz  should  be  understood  within  the  combination  of  two  religious  contexts, 

namely  the  Islamic  and  the  pre-Islamic,  or  indigenous.  We  cannot  deny  the  role  and 

significance  of either of them if we  are  to  give  an  accurate  view  of their traditional  and 

religious  values.  The current Central  and Inner Asian traditional religion is composed of 

“the  adaptations  of home  grown  and  ‘imported’  religious  concepts  and patterns  that  had 

been  assimilated  as its  own by a particular community at  a particular time,  regardless  of 

its  ‘origin’  as  a cultural  historian  might insist upon.  Islam itself eventually became part 

of  that  ‘indigenous’  tradition  just  as  earlier  ‘foreign’  elements  had.”399  Moreover,  as 

Privratsky notes,  what really matters is the “local contextualizations” of Islam among the

399


 DeWeese, p.  29.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



352

Kazakhs  and “other peoples like them with adequate means of laying hold of the Muslim 

life even where its orthopractic and legal tradition is weakly understood, inconvenient, or 

perceived as foreign.”400

The  main  argument  of  this  thesis  is  that  it  was  due  to  their  nomadic  life  and 

ancient  religious  worldview  that  the  Kyrgyz  (and  Kazakhs)  did  not  and  could  not  fully 

adopt  Islam,  which  is  mostly  suitable  for  sedentary  societies  and  cultures.  It  is  true  that 

all  Kyrgyz,  except  for  a  few  herding  families,  lived  a  sedentary  life  during  the  Soviet 

period  for  more  than  seventy  years.  However,  the  Islamization  process  among  the 

nomadic  Kyrgyz  ceased  after  the  Soviets  occupied  Central  Asia.  Due  to  strong  anti- 

Islamic and anti-“shamanic” campaigns and the atheist ideology of the Communist Soviet 

Union,  the  Kyrgyz  estranged themselves  from  some  of the  formal  Islamic  practices  and 

values,  which they had  already  adopted before the  Soviet occupation.  Most  of their pre- 

Islamic  religious  practices  and  values,  which  also  suffered  from  Soviet  anti-religious 

propaganda, had been Islamized by the end of the  19th century.  Therefore, many ordinary 

people do not and cannot well distinguish between Islamic  and pre-Islamic practices  and 

beliefs.

Now,  after  their  independence,  the  Kyrgyz  continue  to  lead  a  sedentary  life, 

which they had adopted in the early Soviet period.  The historical process of Islamization 

among nomadic Kyrgyz  and Kazakhs, which had ceased after the Soviet establishment, is 

resuming  again.  Both fundamentalist Islamic  groups,  such  as  Hizb-ut-Tahrir and  official 

Orthodox (Sunni) Islam,  are fighting against native/nomadic practices  and beliefs among 

many other aspects of secular life in Kyrgyzstan.

400


 Privratsky, p. 243.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



353

There  is  also  the  homegrown  intellectual  movement,  Tengirchilik,  promoted  by 

native  scholars  and  intellectuals,  who  want  their  people  to  progress  by  fostering  their 

ancestral worldview.  As  scholars and anthropologists in the field of humanities,  we must 

acknowledge  some  of  the  legitimate  views  of  native  scholars  and  intellectuals  and 

support  them  in  their  effort  to  preserve  certain  traditions  and  values  from  which  the 

modem  world  can  greatly  benefit.  As  Sari'gulov  mentioned,  the  value  or  uniqueness  of 

the  Tengirchilik  worldview  is  that  it  puts  Nature  above  everything,  including  human 

beings.  Nature  and  Its  forces  should  be  considered  sacred  because  they  function  like  a 

prophet  who  brings  the  message  of  Tengir,  God,  Allah,  Quday,  etc.  Respecting  and 

preserving  Nature  by  considering  that  everything  in  It  has  a  soul  must  be  a  universal 

belief.  Like  many  other  international  environmentalist  organizations,  the  advocates  of 



Tengirchilik  want  to  teach  people  to  respect  and  preserve  Nature.  They  take  a  spiritual 

approach  to  tell  or  warn  people  that  Nature  or  Mother  Earth  can  and  will  no  longer 

tolerate humans’  exploitation of Her natural resources and other countless environmental 

problems  caused  by  humans.  Like  all  the  other  creatures  on  the  Earth,  human  life  will 

continue  to  depend  on  Nature.  Therefore,  there  is  a possible  future  connection  between 

Tengirchilik and international environmentalism.

The nomadic  Kyrgyz  and Kazakhs did not practice writing and thus did not leave 

any  written  records  about  their  customs  and  social  life  in  general.  However,  they 

developed  a unique verbal  art,  which allowed  them to  preserve  major  socio-cultural  and 

historical  events  in  oral  form  and pass  them from  one  generation  to  the  next,  each  time 

renewing and adapting them to the conditions of their changing life and times.  Thus,  the 

nomadic  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  stored  and  celebrated  their  socio-cultural  history  in  oral

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3 54

forms, e.g., epic poetry,  folktales, proverbs, and ayt'ish singing contests between aki'ns, or 

improvising oral  poets.  As  a primary and  native  source,  epic  songs in particular contain 

rich and first-hand information about people’s religious beliefs,  socio-cultural values, and 

customs,  including  funeral  rites.  The  bearers  and  transmitters  of this  oral  tradition  were 

the  wise  and  eloquent  members  of  the  society  such  as  elders,  poets,  epic  singers, 

storytellers, and healers/shamans, who were living books.

In  his  very  recent  book  titled  Jilga  bergis jarim  ktin401  (A  Half Day  Which 

Cannot be Exchanged for a Year), Sulayman Kayipov, an expert on Kyrgyz oral tradition, 

writes like many other Kyrgyz intellectuals his true  feelings  about the current and future 

state  and  fate  of Kyrgyz  national  heritage  and  identity.  He  truly burns  (ktiy-)  and  aches 

(si'zda-) inside and asks:  “If I, who was bom  as  a Kyrgyz, who  grew up as  a Kyrgyz,  and 

who will  die  as a Kyrgyz,  does  not ache  [care],  who will? If I  and others like  me  do  not 

bum  [care],  who  will  bum  [care]  for  the  Kyrgyz,  please  tell  me,  my  brother!”402  He 

continues:  “If we do not care,  the spirits of our ancestors  won’t leave us  alone.  If we  do 

not care, our children will not care either.”403  As a native scholar and member of a small 

nation like the Kyrgyz, I also strongly believe that the loss of our traditional customs and 

native  language  equates  to  the  loss  of  the  Kyrgyz  nation  and  their  identity.  As  many 

Kyrgyz  believe,  it  was  not  Islam  or  Muslimness  that  preserved  the  Kyrgyz  for  many 

centuries  as  one  people  or  ethnic  group,  but  it  was  rather  their  distinctive  traditional



401  Kayipov,  Sulayman. Jilga bergis jarim  ktin  (A Half Day Which Cannot be Exchanged for a Year). 

Bishkek,  2006.

402 The sentence in Kyrgyz reads:  “. . .   Kirgiz bolup torolgdn,  Kirgiz bolup jetilgen,  Kirgiz boydon oliiiigo 

bel baylagan,  men sizdabay kim sizdayt;  men jana men sinduular kiiyboso,  bul kirgizga kim kiiyot,  aytchi, 

tuugan!” Ibid., p.  138.

403 Op.cit.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



355

customs  and  values,  and  the  art  of  oral  creativity  all,  of  which  stemmed  from  their 

nomadic lifestyle.

As  the  Central  Asian  saying  states Aalim  boluu  ongoy,  adam  boluu  kiyin,  “It  is 

easy to become a scholar, but it is difficult to become a good human being,” many people 

can be  smart by reading books, writing scholarly works,  and inventing new  sociocultural 

theories, but it is more important for scholars to be of good use for the society, to interact 

with  people  of all  backgrounds  and  help  them  to bridge  their traditional  values  and  life 

with those of the  modem  world. We must educate  new  generation(s) of people who  will 

be  able  to  live  according  to  their  own  national/traditional  values,  and  yet  can  live 

peacefully with their neighbors by showing tolerance for cultural and religious diversity.

Finally,  it  is  impossible  to  achieve  or  find  absolute  truth  about  anything.  One

time,  after our interesting discussion of the  above religious  debates between  Islamic  and

Kyrgyz  nomadic  traditions,  my  father  Mamatkerim  said:  “No  one  knows  the  absolute

truth about this  world and next world.  Do  you know what Omar Hayam wrote?” And he

recited  in  Uzbek  from  his  memory  the  following  four  lines  from Hayam translated  into

Uzbek by an Uzbek poet:

Biz kelib ketguchi tu’garak jahon,

Na boshi malimu, na ohiri ayon,

Gar su’rsalar, hech kim aytib berolmas,

Biz qaydan keldig-u, keturmiz qayon.

Lit:


This round earth into which we come and from which we depart,

No one knows how it came into existence and how it will end,

If someone asks, no one can answer

Where we came from and where we will go [after we die].404

404

 The standard  19th century English translation by Edward Fitzgerald is as follows: 

“Into this Universe, and Why not knowing,

Nor Whence, like Water willy-nilly flowing;

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



356

However,  a  majority  of  ordinary  people  try  to  make  sense  of their  life  and  the

world  in  which  they  live  by  having  meaningful  interactions  with  each  other.  These

interactions  and  communal  and  national  identities  are  built  around  certain  religious

beliefs,  traditional  values,  and customs,  which make up  “Culture.”  Culture  is  not  frozen

in  time  of  course;  it  goes  through  the  processes  of  renewal  or/and  change  during

historical  periods  of  transition.  It  is  usually  during  those  transition  periods,  such  as

modernization,  westernization,  and globalization that people, mainly intellectuals, turn to

traditional  values of their national heritage to solve the socio-cultural problems that their

societies face. Moreover, this national and cultural self-protection is arising in places like

Kyrgyzstan  because  other  major  prophetic  religions  such  as  Islam  and  Christianity,

especially their  fundamentalist  or  fanatic  believers,  are  fighting  or  competing with  each

other over prospective converts.  Peoples  and cultures which are religiously characterized

as  “pagan”  also believe in the existence of one God, but they communicate with God by

developing  and practicing different sets  of rituals  and customs  due to various ecological,

environmental,  and  socio-economic  factors.  Privratsky,  indeed,  does  a  very  good job  in

convincing  his  readers  to  believe  in  his  theory  of collective  memory  applied to  Kazakh

religion.  It is to be noticed,  that as a pious Christian missionary  and  scholar, he  does  see

the value  of any religious behaviors  and rituals that come from non-monotheist or pagan

religions.  He  states:  “.  .  .  in  the  collective  memory  of the  Kazaks  it  is  not these  archaic



And out o f it, as Wind along the Waste,

I know not Whither,  willy-nilly blowing.”

{The Rubaiyat o f Omar Khayam by Edward Fitzgerald.  Hypertext Meanings and Commentaries 

from the Encyclopedia o f the Self by Mark Zimmerman. URL:  www.selfknowledge.com)

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



357

traditions  [i.e.,  native;  pre-Islamic  or un-Islamic]  but “our Muslimness,” the Muslimness 

of our  ancestors  that  requires  us  to  remember  them  with  the  Quran  and  a  sacred  meal. 

Inner  Asian  religious  values  have  been  conceptually  and  affectively  accommodated  to 

Islam in  a thoroughgoing way.”405  Due to his  Christian background,  he  finds  comfort in 

the  idea  that  Kazakhs  are  not  pagans,  but  Muslims  who  share  many  common  religious 

values  with  Christians.  However,  I  and  other  Kyrgyz  intellectuals  may  be  criticized  by 

Privratsky  and  others  alike  for  doing  the  same  thing.  As  learned  native  scholars,  we 

cannot stand  aside  and allow  other scriptural  religions to condemn our traditional  values 

and  customs.  It  is  difficult  to  prove  that  nomadic  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  embraced  Islam 

voluntarily  and  overnight.  Islamization  was  achieved  after many centuries  of resistance. 

Yes, today, in their “collective memory,” most Kyrgyz  and Kazakhs consider themselves 

and their ancestors Muslim from time immemorial. This is because the majority of people 

do  not  know  the  political  history  of  Islam,  or  how  it  spread.  Their  ancestors  did 

voluntarily  not  forget  their  native  beliefs  and  choose  Islam  over  their  native  religious 

beliefs.  In  the  same  way  that  Christianity  was  brutally  imposed  on  Native  Americans, 

Islam  was  not  tolerant  of nomadic  religious  values  and  practices,  and  Islamization  was 

achieved  through  conquest  and  organized  missionary  works.  The  historical  process  of 

Islamization erased most of the existing native “collective memory” and the second phase 

of that process is taking place now.  The Kazakhs and the Kyrgyz  do remember their pre- 

Islamic  traditional  values  and  religious  practices.  What  they  don't  remember  is  where 

those  values  came  from.  Their  ancient  religious  beliefs  and  traditional  values  were  not 

written in holy books such as Quran, Bible,  and Torah, but had turned into their lifestyle.

405



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling