Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet27/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   87

 

TOURAINE 

Continued… 

 

DOMAINE DU SALVARD, M. DELAILLE, Cheverny  

Classified as a VDQS in 1973, Cheverny moved to full AOC in 1993. The appellation extends along the left bank of the Loire 

from Sologne to the outskirts of Orleans. Its symbol is the castle of Cheverny, built in the style of Louis XIII.

 

Domaine Salvard 

has been a family wine estate since the 1890s. From father to son, the Delailles continue to transmit the family’s winemaking 

passion. Craftsmen of terroir and quality since the beginning, the latest generation expertly manage their 30 ha of vines with 

a program of conscientious vineyard management. After the grapes for the Cheverny Blanc are picked they receive a short 

maceration followed by a pneumatic pressing. Settling of the juice for 48 hours is succeeded by an alcoholic fermentation in 

thermoregulated stainless steel tanks at a temperature of 18-20°c for10 days. The wine rests on its fine lees at 12°c for 3-12 

months of maturation (according to the cuvée) before bottling. So much for the fiche technique. Made from 90% Sauvignon 

and 10% Chardonnay the Cheverny Blanc is junior Sancerre with intense gooseberry crispness. The nose is full and fruity 

with elderflower and blackcurrant bud aromas and the creaminess of the Chardonnay fills out the palate providing weight 

and structure. Try it with goat’s cheese (Pouligny St Pierre); it would also go well with smoked eel, snails à la 

bourguignonne, crayfish and asparagus. The Cheverny Rouge is another one of those “the cranberry-juice-is-on-the-loose” 

numbers, a fruitsome soother blended from Pinot Noir and Gamay. Mildly serious frivolity, if you know what I mean. Grapes 

are macerated and fermentation with the skins last 8-10 days at 28C so most of the colour and aroma is drawn out. Gentle 

pneumatic pressing avoids extracting harsh tannins. After malolactic the wine is stored in underground vats before bottling. 

A mid-cherry red, an engaging nose of red cherries, cloves and earth, lively, fresh and fruity with strawberry and liquorice 

dominant on the palate with acidity and tannin provided by the Pinot, the red Cheverny is a good accompaniment to guinea 

fowl, chicken, charcuterie and hard cheeses. 

 

2016 


CHEVERNY BLANC 

 



2016 

CHEVERNY ROUGE 

 

 



 

DOMAINE DE LA CHARMOISE, HENRY MARIONNET, Touraine 

If you don’t like Gamay you’ll love this! Even the baby of the bunch has restless bouncing energy with sweet, perfumed, red 

berry fruit on the nose, vibrant red cherry and blueberry fruit and lovely freshness on the palate, yet also good concentration 

for a Gamay. It has lovely purity, is silky smooth, concentrated but not heavy. The bottle’s label suggests (demands) that you 

“server frais”, lightly chilled from the fridge. Marionnet is generally considered to be the best exponent of this grape variety 

in the Loire. By picking late and discarding green grapes he achieves maximum ripeness which translates into fruitiness of the 

wine. The Vinifera is a remarkable wine, an attempt to recreate the flavour of pre-phylloxera wine. “I wanted to know if an 

ungrafted vine gave the same wine as its grafted equivalent and if our grandparents were drinking the same wine as us. Not 

only are the wines completely different but they also are always better in the case of those made from original stock. They give 

more aromas, better colour and richer matter than those from the younger rootstock”. Lovely freshness, delicious purity, 

perfumed berry fruit – no blowsy banana fermentation odours. By Gamay standards this is a rich full-bodied red uncannily 

reminiscent of liquidised fragolino grapes. Cour-Cheverny provides the ungrafted vine of the Romorantin, a grape variety 

planted in the 1850s, and therefore pre-phylloxera. Provignage is the name given to the technique used originally to 

propagate the vines. The wine is living history. This golden wine brings to mind apples, pears and white flowers, but also 

dried fruits, minerals and honey. The combined length, richness and complexity is fabulous – it is difficult to imagine this 

originates in the Loire. So – organic methods in conjunction with old, ungrafted vines, no filtration, no sulphur, no 

chaptalisation – purity from a grower whose wines are a true reflection of his love and passion for natural things



 

2011 

PROVIGNAGE 



 

2016 



GAMAY DE TOURAINE 

 



 

 

 

CEDRIC ALLION, Touraine 

 

2016 



SAUVIGNON DE TOURAINE “LES GRANDES VIGNES” 

 



 

 

DOMAINE GUY ALLION, Touraine 



This domaine with its beautiful Touraine-style house made out of tufa produces first class Sauvignon from vines grown on 

perruche (sandy-clay) soil. The estate is managed according to the Terra Vitis programme, a codified system which posits 

not only respect for the environment but knowledge of the land, parcel by parcel. This sensitivity to the environment 

means that natural rather than chemical solutions can be pursued in the vineyard. The grapes are picked at maximum 

ripeness and immediately transported to the winery to prevent oxidation. This Sauvignon de Touraine, which in previous 

years has garnered high praise from the Guide Hachette, has lifted aromas of elderflower cordial, Victoria plums and 

hints of grass. The palate is filled with gooseberry fool infused with elderflower and hints of summer fruit. 

 

2016 


SAUVIGNON DE TOURAINE 

 



2015 

SAUVIGNON DE TOURAINE – ½ bottle – stelvin 

 

2015 



SAUVIGNON – 5 litre BIB 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 - 118 - 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

LES CAILLOUX DU PARADIS, CLAUDE & ETIENNE COURTOIS, Touraine – Biodynamic 



I’m going to nail my taste-buds to the standard here – these are my wines. While they are certainly mad enough to appeal to 

my warped sensibility, they also have a sheer honesty that seems bring a smile of bemused lack of recognition to all who taste 

them. I enjoy their unorthodoxy on all levels; I’m content to delve into their undoubted pelagic depths at my leisure. Situated 

in the heart of Sologne, 35 km from Blois, Claude Courtois and his sons elaborate their wines according to ancestral methods 

and are zealous advocates of natural wine. “Nature admits no lie”, as Carlyle said, and Courtois (Claude) often says that his 

wine is made from “true grapes”, pointing out that the French vineyards are generally doped with chemicals in order to 

guarantee bigger yields. There is a price to pay for whereas a vigneron using chemicals can tend ten hectares by himself, in 

bio it takes three people. The first time Eric met Claude Courtois the latter was digging a hole in the ground on his estate. 

“What’s the hole for?” Eric asked. “To bury my enemies”, replied Claude darkly. You spray at your peril in his proximity. 

Claude won’t sell you wine unless you taste it with him and he assesses the cut of your jib, and even then he may not have any 

wine to sell. He is one of the wild men of the region, fierce, generous and capricious, guiding beautiful naturally expressive 

wines to the bottle. 

 

Claude Courtois has created a small farm which exemplifies what biodynamics is all about in terms of biodiversity and self-

sufficiency, although he does not consider himself to be a biodynamic grower. As we will hear Claude is not fond of being 

pigeon-holed or have his methods categorized. Recently, he has handed the reins to one of his sons, Etienne, and just kept a 

couple of hectares for himself. Together they farm a balanced & completely chemical-free 13 hectares of vines in the heart of 

the Sologne. Courtois also grows organic wheat, which he feeds to his cows who provide the manure for the vines. “Nothing 

comes into my vineyard,” he says, meaning no chemicals ever. He has created a well-balanced, bio-diversity with trees, fruit 

trees, vines, woods & fields. No pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers, or synthetic chemicals of any kind are 

allowed on the vines or in the soil of the vineyards. He has his own methods for promoting the diverse life of the soil. The 

grapes – Gamay, Cabernet Franc, Côt (Malbec), Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc & Pineau d’ Aunis and maybe up to 

a further forty varieties (ye dare not ask)—are harvested by hand and only indigenous yeasts are used during fermentation. 

Claude regards the soil on his farm as a living organism. He lives in harmony with nature & the wines he crafts are a pure 

and vibrantly alive testament to outstanding biodynamic winemaking. I mean winemaking. The wines here aren’t submitted to 

a rigid temperature control and there are fluctuations along the seasons, which doesn’t seem to harm the wines, it could even 

make them more apt to stand their SO2-free life without accident. With Courtois you should not speak about the variety. It is 

always about the terroir of the cuvée. There are probably around twenty cuvées, made by design or caprice or the restless 

desire to experiment and push boundaries. As if that wasn’t enough Claude says that wines like Nacarat are made to a secret, 

new recipe. Darkly mysterious as ever we have to accept it for what it is rather than probe its origins. 

 

Quartz is vinified in barrel & aged for 12-24 months in oak. It drinks well in its youth, though decanting is highly 

recommended, & the wine can age for a decade. Golden straw in the glass with shimmering pale highlights. The nose offers 

sliced apple & poached pear backed by apple chutney spiced with brown sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon & allspice. The palate is 

very nutty, with a firm acidity. The wine finishes long & vibrant, with great mineral & core fruit presence & a lingering inner 

mouth perfume of pear eau de vie. This is a truly outstanding, complex wine and we know, from experience, that it ages for 

many a moon. Roots by name and by nature Racines is from hand-harvested, destemmed and gently pressed grapes 

(Cabernet Franc, Côt & Cabernet Sauvignon from 20 hl/ha). Only natural yeasts are used and the juice undergoes an 

extended maceration. Vinified in barrel and then aged for 18 months in oak. Deep purple in the glass the nose is redolent with 

pounded stones, plum, cherries, warm iron and damp chalk. The palate has great depth of dried currant, fig and plum hewn 

to a deep mineral bed. The wine has lovely acidity, a terrific structure and finishes with red berry fruit and mineral zest. Such 

vitality as if the roots referred to had sucked the life blood from the very soil. Many roads at Les Caves lead to Romorantin, a 

grape variety introduced to the Sologne by François 1

st

 who planted it on his mother’s property situated in Romorantin which 

was, at that time the capital of Sologne, and from which town it derives its name. This wine undergoes an elevage of eighteen 

months. The nose is beautifully flowery with notes of Mediterranean flowers, laurel leaves, acacia and fresh almond, whilst 

the palate has tremendous tension and minerality. Etourneaux, meanwhile, is pure Gamay with nice pepper notes, beautiful 

stony minerality. Marked by black confit fruits (cassis, cherry) with a distinctive minerality and a lightly tannic structure this 

is fresh and balanced style of wine. Great persistence with secondary aromas of smokiness. Recommended with well-

preserved tommes de vaches. With aeration this cuvée booms. L’Icaunais means inhabitant of the Yonne. There were 9,000 

hectares of this Gascon variety in the Yonne (Northern Burgundy) before phylloxera. According to the official records of the 

varieties surfaces as of 1988, there were only 3 hectares of Gascon left in the whole world. Yields are naturally low and the 

wine spends between 18 and 24 months in old futs. The mouth is savoury and mineral and the length is terrific. An hour in the 

carafe reveals the true nature of the wine. Utterly rooted in their terrain, they are deep, rootsy-earthy, slow wines, brewed 

with patience, intuition and love. Don’t call them organic or biodynamic or natural. Don’t them at all; they’ll call you. 

. 

2014 


QUARTZ BLANC 

 



2012 

ROMORANTIN 

 

2011 



OR’ NORM 

 



2014 

PLUME D’ANGE 

 

2013 



RACINES BLANC 

 



2013 

RACINES ROUGE 

 

2012 



ETOURNEAUX 

 



2008/10 

L’ICAUNAIS 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 119 - 



TOURAINE 

Continued… 



 

 

 



DOMAINE LE BRISEAU, NATHALIE GAUBICHER, Jasnières – Biodynamic  

Christian Chaussard studied and then taught viticulture and oenology whilst running a small estate in Vouvray. For 

financial reasons he had to give the latter up, but soon decided that he wanted to practise vine-growing and winemaking.  

Before accomplishing that goal, he met Nathalie Gaubicher, a Swiss actress with an oenologist and sommelier diploma, 

and they set out to find vines somewhere in France. In 2002, they settled in the Jasnières/Coteaux-du-Loir area in 

northern Touraine. The entirety of Jasnières covers eighty hectares of vines, and Coteaux-du-Loir about two hundred 

hectares. The soils are largely all clay and silica over a subsoil of limestone, and Domaine le Briseau was started with 

four hectares of vines planted mainly with Chenin Blanc and Pineau d’Aunis. In 2007, the estate had grown to eleven 

hectares. All vineyard work is done according to the principles of organic viticulture (with the certification of Qualité 

France): no pesticides, insecticides or chemical fertilizers are used; nettle and horsetail decoctions are sprayed on the 

foliage; copper is used in modest quantity (less than 5kg/ha); the vines are ploughed and grass allowed to grow between 

the rows. In 2006, the estate started its conversion to biodynamic principles. 

Apart from biodynamic viticulture, the following harvesting and cellar practices are followed: The harvest is done by 

hand in 10kg boxes. The white grapes are pressed lightly and slowly. Débourbage (first racking to separate solid matter 

from juice) takes place after twenty-four hours, then the must goes into barrels for the alcoholic fermentation (none of the 

barrels are new, but rather four to eight year old.) Malolactic fermentation usually follows and is not stopped by any 

means. Nothing is added: there is no chaptalisation, no selected yeasts, no sulphur, no enzymes, no de-acidification, no 

fining. There is one racking to get rid of the wine’s gross lees, and then aging for several months, according to each 

cuvée. There is a light filtration and addition of 2g/hl of sulphur at the time of bottling. The red grapes are trodden by 

foot before going into maceration vats. Maceration occurs under the protection of carbon dioxide in a semi-liquid stage 

(semi-carbonic maceration) and lasts one to three weeks. The musts are then pressed and go into barrels for their 

alcoholic and malolactic fermentations. Again, nothing is added to the wines and the same principles are used at bottling. 

 

It is said that, maybe three or four times a century, the appellation of Jasnières makes the greatest Chenin on earth. I like 

this notion of a terroir, notoriously temperamental, that unabashedly fixes you with its glittering eye and declares: “I am 

what I am – take me, or preferably, leave me!” Most certainly the vagaries of vintage determine the style of the wine: the 

difference, for example, between 2004 & 2005 is profound. Even the more sumptuous examples have an astringency that 

keeps your palate guessing. There’s warmth, waxiness and those almond notes typical of Chenin, some sly sherry 

aromatics and pulped-pear-mingled with-flint-fruit. And here’s the rub, the longer you leave it the more profound it 

becomes, so please carafe in order to allow the dry honey to become runny. Coteaux du Loir means Pineau d’Aunis, a 

grape as delicious as it is unknown. Their wines have a wonderful way of being carefree, yet beautifully made. A 

cornucopia of red fruit notes – wild strawberry, raspberry and thimbleberry with a hint of rose geranium, are graced 

with the characteristic spice of Pineau d’Aunis, revealed as a dusting of black pepper. Lovely just for sipping. Send in the 

malevolent clown with Patapon. Brilliantly purple, utterly bonny, a distillation of red berry aromas and flavours. The 

nose is reminiscent of fermented grape juice; it is warm, approachable, deliciously savoury showing as it does a 

combination of crunchy strawberry, sweet beet and black pepper fruit, backed up by delicate smokiness. The palate is dry 

and taut with a sweet wild strawberry character, and a little chalky perfume. There is an appealing freshness to it, and a 

lovely peppery finish. Bright red cherry, strawberry and pomegranate notes are highlighted in Les Longues Vignes by the 

distinctive dusting of black pepper typical of this grape variety. A bit of smokiness and a waft of violets lend seductiveness 

to the mix. The texture is a bit chewy, though the wine is quite graceful. 

 

2015 


VIN DE FRANCE BLANC « PATAPON » 

 



2015 

VIN DE FRANCE BLANC “KHARAKTER” 

 

2015  



VIN DE FRANCE ROUGE “PATAPON” 

 



2014 

COTEAUX DU LOIR “LUCKY” PINEAU D’AUNIS 

 

2015 



VIN DE FRANCE ROUGE « LES MORTIERS » 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 120 - 

 

TOURAINE 

Continued… 

 

.

 



Let me not to the marriage of true wines 

Admit impediments. Must is not must 

Which alters when the winemaker fines 

Or strip filters the juice to overtly adjust. 

O no! it is an ever-fixed marker 

That looks on critics and is never shaken; 

It is the star to every wandering Parker, 

Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken. 

Wine needs no obvious tool, no obfuscating techniques 

To nurture the naked juice from barrel’s womb 

Such wine alters not within brief hours and weeks, 

But bears out even to its final tomb. 

If this be error and upon me proved, 

Then I am a fool, from my wits removed. 

Cod Shakespeare

 

 



 

DOMAINE PASCAL SIMONUTTI, Touraine – Organic 

There is a great line in Monsters Inc where they are advertising the renewable power ethos behind frightening the bejasus out 

of little children “We scare because we care”. Drinking Pascal Simonutti’s Gascon wine one senses a wine that does not hold 

back from spooking the frail of heart. This wine is firmly positioned at the durian fruit end of the aromatic spectrum; if this 

wine were a labour of Hercules it would be the mares of Diomedes and the Augean stables rolled into one. And yet, reader, I 

loved it. Lurking amongst the funk is unmediated fruit and sweet earth; its lightness carries a rustic charm. 

  

Incidentally, the wine is made from a grape variety called Gascon that still nibbles a living in a handful of vineyards in the 

Touraine. Claude Courtois makes another example. To say that not a lot of information exists in the public domaine about 

this grape is an understatement; you can get as googley as you like; you will be none the wiser.  

  

 

 

2008 


VIN DE TABLE GASCON 

 



 

 

 



DOMAINE DE LA GARRELIERE, FRANCOIS PLOUZEAU, Touraine –Organic 

 

Inspect our Plouzeaus. 

 

François and Pascaline Plouzeau tend their 50 acres of biodynamic vineyards, near the village of Richelieu just to the south 

of Tours. The vineyards at Domaine de la Garrelière have been certified organic by Ecocert and biodynamic by biodyvin. 

They started working the land here (the estate once belonged to the Duc de Richelieu) in the 1970′s, slowly bringing it back to 

life after many years of conventional farming and have quickly become one of the rising stars of the region. 

Yields are low – around 40hl/ha in a region where 60 hl/ha is closer to the norm and the vineyards are on south-east facing 

slopes with limestone and clay soils. The wines are made very naturally…harvested by hand, natural yeasts and carbonic 

maceration…minimal sulphur is used in the wine-making process.  

 

Gamay Tra la la has bright aromas of wild cherry, plum and woodland fruits with hints of exotic spice, pepper, violets, sous 

bois, herbs and pan juices. There are plenty of earthy facets along with some raspberry and red-fruited high-tones – quite a 

pretty smelling wine. Lively, light of body and full of flavour in the mouth, with plum, blackberry and wild cherry fruits, all 

supple and juicy slipping nicely through to a mid-palate that shows hints of spice, dried flowers, rosemary, earth and roasted 

meats. 

 

Le Blanc and Le Rouge do a bit more than it says on the tin. The former is a Sauvignon, natch, and it is natch, extra maturity 

on the vine and low yields conferring some fleshy mouthfeel, whilst Le Rouge is a generous yet fluid Cab Franc, the kind of 

wine that glues a meal together from soup to nuts. 

 

2016 


LE BLANCE MARIE 

 



2016 

CHENIN DE LA COLLINE 

 

2014 



LE ROUGE DES COURNUS 

 



2016 

GAMAY SANS TRA LA LA  

 

 



 

 

 - 121 - 

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling