Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet29/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   87

CENTRAL VINEYARDS 

Continued… 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

DOMAINE HENRI BOURGEOIS, Sancerre  

Spring has come again. The earth is like a child who knows poems. 

Rainer Maria Rilke – Sonnets to Orpheus 

 

An acclaimed producer whose wines exhibit the complexity of the terroir of Chavignol, being chalky with a touch of 



gunflint, initially steely, then ripening in the mouth with a broad array of flavours and wonderful length. The Monts 

Damnés (M.D.) is from grapes harvested on the Monts Damnes, slopes so steep that they are called “cursed”. A grace 

and flavour wine that will age and age. Since the eleventh century noblemen would try to outbid each other just to 

possess a small parcel of this prized land. We would also draw your attention to the manifold other cuvées. The wittily 

titled Petit Bourgeois misses appellation status by a gnat’s whisker. This belt-tightening faux-Sancerre has undeniable 

typicity. La Vigne Blanche comes from vines grown on slopes separating the village of Chavignol from Sancerre, the 

terroir being an amalgam of clay and limestone chalk. Oak aged in barrel for five months on the fine lees, La Vigne 

Blanche is vinous with herbaceous notes of elderflower and ivy as well as a hint of kiwi fruit. Cuvée d’Antan (70 year 

old vines) is a different ball of silex made in “the old style” from vines on south-facing slopes. Viticulture is 

biodynamic, grapes are harvested by hand and after pressing and maceration the wine is left in old wooden barrels 

for eighteen months batonnage. Racking is done after the full moon. The style is sui generis: the wine fills the mouth 

with layer after layer of creamy fruit, a touch of breadiness from the lees and the terroir notes of truffle and warm 

stone. The Jadis is grown on Kimmeridgean Marl (60-year-old vines) and is made according to grandfather’s recipe.

 

This is a wine of great charisma; very aromatic and concentrated. Complex and well-balanced, Sancerre Jadis reveals 

aromas of exotic fruits and honey. The oaked Etienne Henri cuvée comes from the older vines on flint clay slopes. 

Such a method of vinification requires top-quality grapes for a successful marriage of wood and wine. 

Alcoholic fermentation is exclusively in oak barrels followed by 12 months of maturation on fine lees. Result: a fine 

wine of great complexity. Les Demoiselles is a Pouilly-Fumé made from select Sauvignon grapes from the Saint-

Laurent Kimmeridgean marls, the site of the first vines planted in Pouilly-Fumé. Around 85% of this wine has been 

fermented in stainless steel and the other 15% in oak from the Tronçais forest. It is aged on the fine lees for seven to 

eight months. Finally, don’t neglect the rosé, a real wine by any other name, with its lovely nuances of wild strawberry 

fruit. All the wines are sublime with cheese. 

Once upon a time, o best beloved, a great oak was planted in what would become the National Forest of Saint-Palais 

near Bourges. As the centuries passed it grew bigger and stronger and one day became the eldest and most majestic of 

a line of great oaks that were used to build the frame of the Saint Etienne cathedral in Bourges. Located at the 

crossroads of telluric forces (yes, this was a feng shui oak tree), legend has it that Sully, King Charles V and Agnès 

Sorel came to rest at the foot of this great oak and many others since used it as a place of assignation. But in 1993 a 

violent storm struck down the 433 year-old tree. In the subsequent auction the Bourgeois family outbid interested 

buyers from around the world to preserve this piece of local culture and to renew it by crafting it into barrels in which 

they placed the fruit of their most cherished Sauvignon and Pinot vines. As you wipe away a misty tear know that the 

wines are magnificent, liquid testaments to the vessel in which they have been aged. “Old noted oak! I saw thee in a 

mood /Of vague indifference; and yet with me /Thy memory, like thy fate, hath lingering stood /For years, thou hermit, 

in the lonely sea /Of grass that waves around thee!” 

 

2016 


PETIT BOURGEOIS 

 



2016 

QUINCY “HAUTE VICTOIRE”  

 

2016 



SANCERRE BLANC “LA VIGNE BLANCHE” 

 



2016 

SANCERRE BLANC “LA VIGNE BLANCHE” – ½ bottle 

 

2015 



SANCERRE BLANC “LE M.D.” 

 



2014 

SANCERRE BLANC “CUVEE JADIS” 

 

2013 



SANCERRE BLANC “ETIENNE HENRI” 

 



2014 

SANCERRE BLANC “CUVEE D’ANTAN” 

 

2002 



SANCERRE BLANC “LE CHENE SAINT-ETIENNE” 

 



2016 

POUILLY-FUME EN TRAVERTIN 

 

2015 



POUILLY-FUME “LA DEMOISELLE”  

 



2014 

SANCERRE ROUGE “LES BARONNES” 

 

2003 



SANCERRE ROUGE “LE CHENE SAINT-ETIENNE” 

 



2016 

SANCERRE ROSE “LES BARONNES” 

 

 



 

 

 

 


 

 - 128 - 



FOOD AND WINE OF THE LOIRE 

 

 

Gustave Flaubert once wrote of the Loire valley: “The wind is mild without voluptuousness, the sun soft 



without ardour; the whole landscape pretty, varied in its monotony, light, gracious, but of a beauty which 

caresses without captivating, which charms without seducing, and which, in a word, has more common 

sense than grandeur and more spirit than poetry. It is France.” 

 

 

 



Joanna Simon writes in Wine With Food: “Gourmet and gourmand, the two extremes (though not opposites of good food) can find 

contentment in the… Loire region” Stretching as it does from Nantes almost to the Ardèche it would be foolish to generalise about the food 

from the Loire, but the region, if we may call it so, has an exhilarating gastronomic heritage. Flavours tend to be fresh and subtle rather than 

heavy and rich. Dishes are cooked simply to highlight the quality of the ingredient. The white wines are pungent from the brine-scented 

Muscadet to the intensely flavoured (but never heavy) Chenin and Sauvignon to sapid light reds from Cabernet Franc, Gamay or Pinot Noir. 

Then, of course, there are the fabulous sweet wines… 

 

Beurre Blanc 

This is a “nantaise” specialty. People from Nantes attribute its creation to Mère Clémence (a restaurant on the levee called the “Divatte”). 

Its reputation grew quickly and it began to be served at all the fine tables in Anjou, Tours and all the way to Orléans. Beurre Blanc 

accompanies pike, salmon, turbot, and even scallops marvellously. The sauce is an emulsion of melted salted butter thickened with a 

reduction of shallots and vinegar (Muscadet wine vinegar for purists). 

 

Fish & Shellfish 

The wild salmon fished in the Loire has now become a part of legend. It is now as rare as truffles would be on the daily lunch table and 

has been replaced with imported salmon or salmon from fish farms. The salmon is cut into steaks which are then grilled or served in fillet 

with sauce. Wild salmon should be drunk with Savennières, the muscularity of the noble fish pierced by the harpoon of the wine’s natural 

acidity, the natural oils of the fish softening and enriching the angularity of the Chenin, a true regenerative mutuality. Pike is a very 

savoury fish that is gorgeous with beurre blanc, but may also be served roasted – as it is in Sologne. Loire River pikeperch fillet in 

Vouvray wine with asparagus and morel mushrooms is a classic rendering (with Vouvray, naturally). On a similar theme, grilled shad 

with wild mushrooms and sorrel, or braised with white wine with beurre blanc are particularly good hosed down by a nippy Anjou or 

Saumur Blanc. Friture de Loire is composed of bleak fish and gudgeon and is prepared with garlic butter. Muscadet is a good bet here. 

Muscadet and oysters are another happy marriage and for the skyscraper fruits de mer platter good quantity as well as good quality is a 

prerequisite! You can even try Gros Plant (or maybe not). Anguille (eel) is prepared in matelote sauce with red wine, cut into chunks, 

stewed in red wine with mushrooms, small white onions and lardons and sometimes served with fresh pasta and local truffles. Local chefs 

will cook their eel in Chinon or Bourgueil; these reds have an earthiness that respects this hearty rustic dish. More elaborate dishes might 

include: sautéed scallops served with vegetable parmentière, whipped cardamom sauce and beetroot butter or John Dory fillets served 

with ginger butter and garden vegetables or roasted langoustines set around a creamy risotto made with local andouillette (sausage made 

of chitterlings) seasoned with shellfish vinaigrette. One of Henri Bourgeois’ oak-aged white Sancerres would fit the bill beautifully here; 

even a red Sancerre would do. 

 

Charcuterie, Snails, Poultry and Prunes 

The rillettes from Tours and Vouvray are just as renowned as those from Mans. Rillons are delicious served warm, not hot. According to 

Balzac they look like “pork residue sautéed in fat which looks like cooked truffles.” Uncork that bottle of Gamay de Touraine from Henry 

Marionnet which has been cooling in the fridge and gulp with extreme prejudice. That opposition of sweet fat with the hint of bitter 

cherry and damson makes a happy marriage. The rustic flavours of a casserole of snails from the St. Nicolas de Bourgueil area, Touraine 

high quality free-range chicken, Bresse pigeon or calf’s sweetbreads braised perhaps with candied lemon and cumin and served with 

turnip-rooted chervil attract a chunky Anjou-Villages (they don’t come chunkier than those from Ogereau) or an earthy Saumur-

Champigny. “Potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism are very good for the lips: especially prunes and prism,” quoth Mrs General in Little 

Dorrit. Cooked with pork, rabbit, chicken and fish, prunes feature heavily in Loire gastronomy – prisms are noticeably absent. A good 

Bourgueil, such as the one from Domaine de la Chevalerie, is a tremendously adaptable red; its soothing gravelly flavours, ripe tannins 

and refreshing acidity, neither dominate nor are dominated, but flow, swirl and eddy like a river around the constituent parts of the dish.

 

 



Goat’s cheese 

The area along the Loire is known for the diversity of goats’ cheese. The “Chèvres”, as goats’ cheeses are called in France, are available 

in pyramids, rolls or conical shapes. Some of the varieties are coated with plant coals or depending on the degree of maturity, covered 

with a fine mould rind. The Crottin de Chavignol is most noteworthy; others such Sainte-Maure de Touraine, Selles sur Cher, and 

Pouligny Saint-Pierre are worth seeking out. Gourmets respect these goat’s cheeses which have been produced according to an old 

tradition in the places they are named after. Take a mature piece of goat’s cheese and put a little on the tip of your tongue and drink some 

fine Sancerre and take in the interplay of chalkiness, creaminess and tangy gooseberry as the cheese crumbles on your taste buds. 

 

 


 

 - 129 - 

 

THE AUVERGNE  

 

Too much and too little wine. Give him none, he cannot find truth; give him too much, the same. 



 

-

 



Blaise Pascal (born in Clermont-Ferrand) 

 

 



DOMAINE JEAN MAUPERTUIS, Côtes d’Auvergne – Biodynamic 

Stop sneering at the back. We’ll provide the vin if you provide the table. 

Whether grown in volcanic hills called puys, in Limagne, or on the hills (domes) on the eastern edge of the Massif Central, 

Auvergne wines are made with the Gamay variety, which has been cultivated in the region for centuries. 

Domaine Maupertuis is located in the commune of Pérignat-lès-Sarlièves fairly close to Clermont-Ferrand (twinned with 

Salford and Aberdeen amongst other places). The vines, some of them 100 years old, are planted on a mixture of terroirs, but 

the Pierres Noires (from vineyards adjacent to La Roche Noire) are on volcanic basalt.

 

Slightly cloudy with an aroma of 



barnyard when it is first opened. This dissipates quickly, but leaves behind a topsoil smell that remains to accompany the 

raspberry notes. Sour cherry and pomegranate seed flavours are accompanied with earthiness too. This is a Gamay as nature 

intended, organic, unfiltered and unsulphured, as prickly as a hedgehog with ants in his pants, a dark pickled damson strut 

across the tongue, and you should drink it with alacrity from a pot Lyonnais with some tripoux or “Truffade” a baked mixture 

of sliced potatoes and Tome de Cantal. By the way there is some Mirefleurien in this wine, a grape variety named after an 

Auvergnate village. What it gives other than a soupçon of local street cred I have no idea. 

It is important to appreciate the simple things in this complex world of ours, as someone once wrote. The Guillaume is an 

aerial number and asks you to remove the bottle to the nearest picnic zone. Neyrou is 100% Pinot Noir from 25 year old vines 

that grow on an outcrop of marl with limestone overlooking the plain of Limagne. Neyrou is the ancient Auvergnate name for 

Pinot Noir. Fermented with natural yeasts in concrete vats this is beautifully pure, elegant Pinot with dark red fruits and 

peppery notes. Take the Bulles by the short and pointies. It is a cute Pet Bul made au natural (natch) with wild yeasts and 

(second) fermentation finishing in the bottle with manual disgorgement with no malolactic, no filtering, no fining and no 

sulphur. Dare we say that this wine has vulcanicity? We daren’t. 

 

NV 


CHARDONNAY PUY LONG (2016) ~ limited availability (from autumn) 

 



NV 

VDF GAMAY D’AUVERGNE “CUVEE PIERRES NOIRES” (2016) 

 

NV 



VDF GAMAY D’AUVERGNE “LA PLAGE” 

 



NV 

VDF PINOT NOIR “NEYROU” (2016) 

 

NV 



VDF PETILLANT PINK BULLES (2016) 

Sp/Ro 


 

 

 



DOMAINE NO CONTROL, VINCENT MARIE, Auvergne - Biodynamic 

No Control consists of 5 hectares of vines in the Auvergne featuring the following grape varieties: Gamay, Pinot Noir, Syrah, 

Chardonnay, Sauvignon, Sylvaner and Pinot Auxerrois which Vincent uses to make 5-7 cuvees. No Control also has an 

impressively diverse range of terroirs born from recent and former volcanic activity. This gives the wines typical features and 

a specific mineral taste. Farming respects living organisms, vegetable matter, soil and health. Since 2013, the vines have been 

in conversion to organic agriculture. Vincent’s work with Patrick Meyer allowed him to gain and understanding and 

experience of biodynamics. Each year the plots get the basic biodynamic preps including 500 (cow-horn manure) and 501 

(horn silica). 

  

Vincent works one plot without mechanization, using animal traction, a horse, which further contributes to the microbial life 

in the soil. “Fusion is named after the name of a music style “which I very much like for its mixing of hip-hop and energetic 

rock. My favourite bands are Rage Against The Machine (of course), Faith No More, Suicidal Tendencies, Body Count. 

Regarding wine, it is also the fusion between the Gamay style from Auvergne and that prevalent in Beaujolais and between 

two types of vinification.” 

 

Located in Volvic on feldspathic sand the Fusion vineyards are on south-facing slopes 420 m above sea level. Yields from the 

15-110 year old vines are naturally low, the grapes carefully harvested in small crates. They are then fed as whole bunches in 

two fibreglass vats. In the first vat grapes are stomped to make space in the vat and to allow maceration of whole bunches in 

the juice. The grapes in the second vat undergo carbonic maceration. Devatting, pressing, blending of both vats with the free-

run and pressed juice. Maceration of 3 weeks. No added chemical inputs. Half aged in vat, half in 15 hl barrels for 8 months 

No filtration, fining or sulphur added. The real deal –fusion, not confusion. Appellation no control. Magma comes from vines 

on the bedrock of the Beauregard Vendon plot. The soil is granitic, the east-facing vines are 25 years old and situated at 430 

metres altitude. Classic no intervention winemaking - whole bunches in a wooden tronconic tank with daily punch-downs over 

12 days. Devatting, pressing, blending of the free-run and pressed juice. No added chemical inputs. 

 

2015 


FUSION 

 



2016 

FUSION - magnum 

 

2016 



ROCKAILLE BILLY 

 



2016  

ROCKAILLE BILLY - magnum 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 - 130 - 



 

 

 



LE CLOS SAINT-JEAN, RICHARD & JOEL LAPALUE, Côtes Roannaise– Organic 

Located by the village of Saint-Jean de Maurice, a famous medieval town, in a commune that is literally at the beginning of 

the Loire. Organic since 1996 (certified Ecocert) this small domaine is situated on steep granite slopes Harvest is by hand and 

ferment is whole harvest in stainless tanks. 

 

2016 


COTES ROANNAISE ROUGE 

 



2016 

COTES ROANNAISE ROUGE – 10 litre BIB 

 

 



 

 

 

 



DOMAINE DES PALAIS, YANN PALAIS, Côtes Roannaise– Organic 

This is an old vineyard abbey now a family estate in the village of Ambierle. The vineyards are on pink granite at 400 metres 

above sea level. La Tassee des Anges is a blend of 40% Syrah and 50% Gamay whole bunch fermented with its own yeasts in 

stainless tanks. A natural little number with very low sulphur addition. This is what the Roannaise does so well – big scoops of 

fruit, but steering wide of the bubblegum idiom. 

 

 

2016 


COTES ROANNAISE ROUGE – 10 litre BIB 

 



2015 

GAMAY SYRAH LA TASSEE DES ANGES IGP D’URFE 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Here once, through an alley Titanic, 

Of cypress, I roamed with my Soul- 

Of cypress, with Psyche, my Soul. 

There were days when my heart was volcanic

 

 

Edgar Allan Poe 



 

DOMAINE DU PICATIER, GERALDINE & CHRISTOPHE PIALOUX, Côtes Roannaise– Biodynamic 

Domaine du Picatier is the project of Christophe and Géraldine Pialoux, who took over the estate in 2007, Christophe having 

previously studied at the lycée viticole in Beaune and worked extensively for Drouhin. Of the couple's 7ha of vines, there is 

1ha of 40-year-old Pinot Noir, and another 1ha devoted to Chardonnay; the rest is Gamay. Domaine du Picatier is situated in 

the the département de la Loire (42), within the greater region of

 the Rhône-Alpes in the centre-east of France. The small 



vineyard region of the Côte Roannaise (200 hectares) benefits from a diverse landscape and farming. But also from the flow 

of the Loire river which has its source just a few kilometres from Saint-Etienne. The vines of Domaine "Le Picatier" reach 400 

metres above sea level at the foot of the Monts de la Madeleine. 

 

The vineyard is on granitic sand and granitic porphyry. The Pilalouxs are very proactive amongst the vines using biodynamic 

preparations and working according to the Maria Thun calendar to stimulate photosynthesis. Low dose of Bordeaux mixture 

and sulphur in the vineyard against mildew and oidium, allowing grass to grow between the vines and then harvesting by 

hand in October putting the bunches into small cases. Vinification respects the farming with foot-pigeage, semi carbonic 

maceration, indigenous yeast ferments and maturation on the lees in a variety of different vessel, from fibreglass to old 

barrels. 

 

The Chardonnay is from sandy clay soils from 30 year old vines with a 24 hour maceration of the grapes before pressing. The 

wine is aged in futs de chene on the fine lees before being bottled without filtration or fining. Auvernat is a synonym of Pinot 

Noir in the Orléanais and the 40 year old vines here are on sandy limestone slopes. The grapes are vinified with whole berries 

with a one month cuvaison on indigenous yeasts. Vinification is semi-carbonic for 10 days and finishes in 228 litre used 

barrels. Unfined, unfiltered and low sulphur addition. 

 

 

2014 


LE BLANC 

 



2014 

GAMENITS 

 

2014 



AUVER NAT 

 



2014 

CUVEE 100% 

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling