Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet38/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   87

 

THE COTE D’OR 

 

We decided this year to give our Burghound a Beaune 



or  several  to  gnaw  on  and  supplement  our  meagre 

selection with some great names. New to the fold are 



Patrick  Miolane  (old-fashioned  beetrooty  red  Saint-

Aubin);  Didier  Larue  (mineral  white  Saint-Aubin 

from  old  vines);  Hubert  Lamy  (superlative  wines); 

Coffinet-Duvernay  (rich  yet  restrained  Chassagnes) 

and Sylvain Bzikot (pleasing Pulignys). 

 

Jean  Javillier  (Volnay  and  Pommard)  produces 



brilliant value Beauness. Simple and unextracted they 

illustrate  amply  that  Pinot  without  new  oak  is  more 

charming than a convention of Leslie Philllips. 

 

Reality Check – The Low-Sulphur Brigade 

 

Northern  Exposure.  Each  year  we  receive  a  tiny 



allocation of wines from Alice & Olivier de Moor. We 

treasure them more than any grand cru Burgundy. The 

Chablis  cuvées  do  not  conform  to  expectation  –  and 

are  rather  wonderful  for  that.  Jean  &  Catherine 

Montanet (Domaine de la Cadette/Montanet-Thoden) 

make super fine, chalky-pure whites and reds. 

 

Another  natural  wine  hero  is  Nicolas  Vauthier,  the 



brains behind the Vini Viti Vinci, negoce operation, or 

the  ayatollah  of  Irancy.  Pinots  that  are  brilliantly 

drinkable,  Chardonnays  and  Aligotés  made  in  the 

oxidative vein. 

 

For hardcore purists (describes us to a t) there are the 



bristling  whites  and  wildly  cavorting  reds  of 

Dominique  &  Catherine  Derain,  the  puncturing 

antidote  to  thickly-buttered  Chardonnays  and  claggy 

Pinots. 


 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 169 - 

 

BURGUNDY FOOD AND WINE 

 

 



Burgundy food is big-hearted, rich and comes in large portions. As the region is known for its heavy red wines and Charollais beef cattle, 

wine and beef are a common feature of Burgundy food. The eponymous boeuf bourguignon mixes these two elements to make a 

traditional Burgundian recipe. The beef is marinated in the wine and then slow-cooked with mushrooms, baby onions, carrots and lardons 

(bits of bacon). Coq au vin is also made in this way, but with a chicken instead of beef. All dishes described as being à la Bourguignonne 

will involve a similar sauce. On a related theme, the meurette dishes are also made with red wine (but no mushrooms), then flambéed with 

marc brandy and served with eggs, fish, red meat or poultry. 

 

Cream-based sauces are common in Burgundy, as are mustard sauces: the andouillette de Mâcon, for example, is served with a mustard 



sauce. Mustard is a regional speciality. It was introduced by the Romans and now there are hundreds of varieties made with everything 

from honey to tarragon, with flavours ranging from cauterising and fiery hot to pleasantly mild. A classic dish might be veal kidneys a la 

moutarde (the Dijon mustard made with verjus not wine vinegar). A good Savigny-lès-Beaune would pick up the earthy notes of the 

kidneys and also add some sweetness to the liaison. 

 

Burgundy snails (escargots) are prepared by stewing the snails with Chablis, carrots, onions and shallots for several hours, then stuffing 



them with garlic and parsley butter before finishing them off in the oven. Black snails, especially those raised on grape leaves, are the best 

in France. Bourgogne-Aligoté is a typical partner; a mineral Chablis and other acid-forward whiter Burgundies would serve equally. 

 

Other than beef, Burgundy has a range of meats including various types of ham, from the Jambon persillé (parsley-flavoured ham in a 



white wine aspic) to ham from the Morvan hills served in a creamy saupiquet sauce; poussins from Bresse; rable de lièvre à la Pivon 

(saddle of hare); and tête de veau or sansiot (calf’s head). Although not near the coast, river fish abound and are sometimes served as a 



pauchouse, poached in white wine, lardons, garlic, butter and onions. Pike, perch, salmon, trout and carp, may be used (amongst others), 

red or white wine accompanied by a village Burgundy of either colour. The potée Mirabelle red is a vegetable soup cooked with bacon 

and pork bits, as above. 

 

Famous cheeses from Burgundy include Chaource, which is creamy and white; St-Florentin from the Yonne valley; the orange-skinned 



Époisses; and many types of chèvre (goat’s cheese) from Morvan (try Goisot’s superb Saint Bris with this). A type of cheesecake called 

gougère is delicious served warm with a glass of Chablis.  

 

I want a BLT with my DRC 

 

There are few greater gastronomic pleasures than drinking great wine with simple, wholesome food. Red wines, be they humble or 



aristocratic, are choosy about the company they keep. The rules of engagement are more guidelines than commandments etched into 

glass. The only qualification is that the flavours are good and that nothing clashes violently. One could, after all, happily drink a Vosne-

Romanée with dishes as diverse as oeufs en meurette, fricassee of cepes, duck with turnips, Bresse chicken and feathered game. Coq au 

vin is a casserole made with coquerel that needs to be simmered for a long period in red Burgundy. Although the pot is traditionally 

meant to be favoured (and flavoured) with Gevrey-Chambertin, a humbler Pinot will suffice with Grand Cru Chambertin exclusively 

reserved for drinking.  

 

The last word should go to Anthony Bourdain, who, in his Les Halles Cookbook, writes forcefully about côte de boeuf: “Serve it with 



French fried potatoes and a staggeringly expensive bottle of Burgundy in a cheap glass. Just to show them who’s the daddy.” 

 

STORY OF AN HISTORIC DOMAINE 

 

With remnants of an old Roman wall on the property, an 1100-year-old winemaking heritage dating back to the powerful medieval monks 



of Cluny, and nothing butselection massale to replant the vineyards (no clones), the Guillot family has every reason to believe that they 

are the oldest organically farmed winery in France. Julien Guillot is the contemporary steward of this land, worked by his family since 

1954. That his grandfather was never seduced by the seemingly magical powers of chemical herbicides and pesticides at the height of 

their post-war popularity has allowed the Clos to be continuously run by nature’s good graces, abundant soil nutrients, and an 

ancient savoir faire passed down through generations of dutiful guardians. 

 

Julien takes his curator’s role seriously. In 1998, he took the farming practices one step deeper into biodynamic viticulture, a much stricter 



approach to the science of organic farming that is thought to have been originally established by the Romans and perfected by the monks 

of Cluny. He is such an enthusiastic student of history that in 2009 and 2010, he 169elabeling a medieval harvest and the transportation of 

the barrels by oxcart to Cluny 9 months later. But as Julien notes, in those times, wines had an alcohol level of only 8%, which is one 

factor that led him to become interested in climate change. 

 

With a legacy like Clos des Vignes du Maynes, in an area of Burgundy known for mass-produced, industrial wines, it’s easy to 



understand why Julien is such an advocate for tradition. The grapes are harvested by hand and fermented in old oak foudres. Fruit 

undergoes partial whole-cluster fermentation, without any additional sulphur or foreign yeast cultures, and Julien leaves the finished 

wines unfined and unfiltered to showcase the layers of fruit. He is a disciple of Jules Chauvet and works without sulphur. 

 


 

 - 170 - 



COTES D’AUXERRE 

 

 



 

 

 



 

DOMAINE DU CORPS DE GARDE, GHISLAINE & JEAN-HUGUES GOISOT, Côtes d’Auxerre – Biodynamic 

The Goisots are perfectionists and this shows in their wine-making. They believe in the primacy of terroir and harvest as late 

as possible to maximise the potential of the grapes. The domaine has existed since the 15

th

 century and Jean-Hugues started 

working on the wines at the age of sixteen. The Goisots firmly believe that great wine begins in the vineyard and have worked 

in organic viticulture since 1993 to protect the soil and nourish the vines. No fertilizers, insecticides or weedkillers are used; 

wild or natural yeasts are encouraged. We start with the red, a Pinot Noir – with a sliverette of César – made with rigour and 

imagination as La Revue du Vin de France might say. This wine touches the hem of nature. The purity of the nose delights – a 

gentle perfume suggesting dried flowers and red fruits. The attack is angular and mineral with the fruit racing along the 

tongue. The Aligoté is benchmark: green-gold, a touch “nerveux”, ripe yet racy. Described by the Guide Hachette as the 

“best Aligoté in the Yonne”, a statement we would find it hard to disavow. (And an equally good Aligoté in the Hither.) The 

(Sauvignon de) Saint Bris is equally stunning: aromatic with notes of peachskins and richly textured. Jean-Hugues has been 

described as “The Pope of Saint Bris”. We are collecting popes on our wine list (q.v. Gilbert Geoffroy in Côtes de Duras). 

When we get a quorum, we will convene them all and elect an über-pope (after we’ve ceremonially incinerated the vine 

clippings), a pope for all seasons and all grape varieties. 

  

2014 


BOURGOGNE-ALIGOTE 

 



2014 

SAINT BRIS EXOGYRA VIRGULA 

 

2012 



BOURGOGNE PINOT NOIR, CORPS DE GARDE 

 



 

 

DOMAINE DE LA CADETTE, JEAN & CATHERINE MONTANET, Vezelay – Organic 



The estate was created by members of the Montanet family and their friends who were willing to embark on this venture. They 

cleared the land and replanted the slopes with 12.5 hectares of vines between 1987 and 1997. Some of the plots of land used 

to belong to Catherine Montanet’s family. 18 plots of land spread more or less evenly over the four rural districts which carry 

the Vézelay appellation: Asquins, Saint-Père, Tharoiseau and Vézelay. The vines are 20 years old on average. The geology 

here is quite unusual as while the granite Morvan massif was coming into being it forced limestone strata up to the surface. 

Most of the vineyards are located on the most ancient strata, the Bajocian, or upper and lower Bathonian limestone and 

others on Liassic marlstone. The intention is to make honest and authentic wines which reflect the distinctive character of 

their region and the climate of a particular year. The Montanets do not resort to so-called “modern” artificial means in their 

wine making process in order to achieve this goal. Naturally enough, they hand-pick their grapes and the wine is produced 

using traditional skills. César is an ancient red grape from northern Burgundy. It makes dark, tannic wines that are softened 

by blending with Pinot Noir. Cuvée L’Ermitage is a blend of Pinot Noir and César. The Melon (same grape as Muscadet) has 

a pale lemon-yellow colour, a bright, clean nose, a zingy palate reminiscent of lime-zest and oyster shell and just a hint of 

ginger and white pepper from the yeast lees. Oysters and smoked fish, beware; this wine has your number and is coming to get 

you. La Saulnier vineyard is a beautiful parcel of land situated on an old road once used by salt smugglers, who extracted 

contraband salt from the water at the nearby “Fontaines Salées”. This wine was bottled in March after spending 

approximately six months in vats. It has a liveliness and freshness that is very appealing for such an elegant wine. The wine is 

bright and fine – silver bells and cockle shells – another wine is our famed collection of oystercatchers. 

 

 

2016 


MELON BLANC 

 



2015 

BOURGOGNE BLANC “LES SAULNIERS” 

 

2014 



BOURGOGNE-VEZELAY “CLOS DU” 

 



2014 

BOURGOGNE ROUGE “CUVEE L’ERMITAGE” 

 

2015 



BOURGOGNE ROUGE “CUVEE GARANCE” 

 



2015 

BOURGOGNE ROUGE “CUVEE GARANCE” – magnum 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 171 - 

 

REGION DE CHABLIS 

 

 



Oyster – (i) A person who liberally sprinkles his conversation with Yiddish expressions (from The Washington Post); (ii) A 

bivalve to be washed down with a good glass of Chablis. 

 

…like a gloomy Analytical Chemist; always seeming to say, after ‘Chablis, Sir?’ – ‘You wouldn’t if you knew what it was 



made of.’ 

 

Charles Dickens – Our Mutual Friend 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

DOMAINE GERARD TREMBLAY, Chablis 

Gérard Tremblay and his wife, Hélène, oversee a domain that they inherited in a line of five generations, but which they 

have mostly built themselves. With 80 acres of vines under production, most of them in the best Premier Cru and Grand 

Cru appellations, their list of Chablis is among the most prestigious in the region. 

Tremblay is known locally as an accomplished wine maker. He is justly famous for his ability to draw out the typicity of 

distinct appellations, underlining the terroir of his vines vintage after vintage. 

 

The domain has a superb new winery, allowing them excellent conditions in which to bring out the quality of the fruit that 



these vineyards produce. The entire winery works by gravity, avoiding unnecessary manipulations of the fruit or pumping 

of juices.  

Grapes are brought directly from the fields and put into pneumatic presses. The juice is then left to settle for more 12 

hours before being stocked in stainless steel tanks with individual temperature controls. Strict hygiene and careful 

temperature control are the keys to mastering quality fermentation in Chardonnay. It is a delicate phase, and it is not 

surprising to find that the best winemakers in white are perfectionists to an extreme. Average yearly production is around 

1760 hectolitres, giving approximately 230,000 bottles per year. Much of the wine is sold directly at the property, though 

they do export a limited quantity of their wine to carefully selected markets. They are adamant the Tremblay wines only 

appear on wine lists or in specialty shops that can do justice to the quality product they are working to produce. 

Understandably, their wines have been noticed by the Guide Hachette, Robert Parker, Dussert-Gerber (who ranks their 

Grand Cru ‘Vaudésir’ as one of the top white Burgundies); Revue des Vins de France; Decanter; Cuisine et Vins de 

France; Sommelier, etc. 

 

The Petit Chablis is uncomplicated but delightfully crisp and refreshing with easy graceful flavours, the olfactory 

equivalent of smelling soft rain on a spring morning (which is what I do for a living!). The basic Chablis is from 10-30 

year old vines grown on Kimmeridgean marl. This terrain is formed from exoguira virgule a (fossilised oyster shells) and 

the specific gout-à-terroir is said to derive from this. As well as the trademark oyster-shell aromas there is a further 

ripeness and secondary hints of mushroom, leaf and honey. The acidity bolts all the flavours into position and accentuates 

the richness and the length of the wine. The forty-year-old vines in the Montmain vineyard contribute to the extra weight 

in this wine. 30% of the wine is aged in futs de chêne. A fine wine with a profound mineral nose, deceptive weight and a 

lingering finish this would go well with something rich and sweet such as scallops or chicken. Set between Preuses and 

Grenouilles, the Vaudésir climat is divided into two parts by the track called “le chemin des Vaudésirs”. It has a double 

orientation, as roughly half of its vines face due south, whilst the remainder face south-west.  

 

Very steep in places, its soil type seems rather lighter than most, and contains less lime. This increasing “earthiness” 

tends to mark the wines, which can be drunk young if one is looking for crispness. The full structure of the wines will take 

several years to develop however, as with all the Grands Crus. Their extreme delicacy has given Vaudésir the reputation 

of being the

 

most feminine of all the climats. 

 

2016 


PETIT CHABLIS 

 



2016 

CHABLIS 


 

2016 



CHABLIS – ½ bottle 

 



2016 

CHABLIS 1er CRU “MONTMAIN” 

 

2016 



CHABLIS 1er CRU “MONTMAIN” – ½ bottle 

 



2016 

CHABLIS 1er CRU “COTE DE LECHET” 

 

2015 



CHABLIS GRAND CRU “VAUDESIR” 

 



2015 

CHABLIS GRAND CRU “VAUDESIR” – magnum 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 172 - 



REGION DE CHABLIS 

Continued… 

 

 

I pour the ’85 Chablis into tall glasses. Anouk drinks lemonade from hers with exaggerated sophistication. Narcisse expresses interest in 



the tartlet’s ingredients, praises the virtues of the misshapen Roussette tomato as opposed to the tasteless uniformity of the European 

Moneyspinner… I catch Caro watching Armande with a look of disapproval. The Chablis is cool and tart, and I drink more of it than I 

should. Colours begin to seem brighter, sounds take on a cut-glass crispness. I bring a herb salad to clear the palate, then foie gras on 

warm toast. We pass from the political situation, to the Basque separatists, to ladies’ fashions via the best way to grow rocket and the 

superiority of wild over cultivated lettuce. The Chablis runs smooth throughout. Then the vol-au-vents, light as a puff of summer air, then 

elderflower sorbet followed by plateau de fruits de mer with grilled langoustines, grey shrimps, prawns, oysters, berniques, spider-crabs, 

greens and pearly-whites and purples, a mermaid’s cache of delicacies which gives off a nostalgic salt smell, like childhood days at the 

seaside… Impossible to remain aloof with such a dish; it demands attention, informality. I bring more of the Chablis; eyes brighten, faces 

made rosy with the effort of extracting the shellfish’s elusive flesh… 

 

Chocolat – Joanne Harris 

 

 

 



 

COLETTE GROS, Chablis 

The Gautheron family has been cultivating vines in Chablis for five generations. The current head of the Domaine Alain 

Gautheron, is working with his wife and son Cyril in an effort to carry on the family’s traditions. This estate makes classic 

Chablis with a clear light gold colour, glinting with emerald green. In the mouth the wine is dry as apple-parings and steely 

with perhaps just a delicate hint of violets and mint. Well balanced with lively acidity, the mouth presents notes of hazelnut 

and biscuits which add a certain charm and length to the finish. If ever a wine smacked of the terroir: the hard white 

limestone and Kimmeridgean soils, if ever a wine seemed to be a combination of light, stone and water, bright, unyielding and 

limpid, then Chablis describes that wine. That swathe of acidity will carve through and wash down myriad dishes: from 

seafood to andouillette chablisienne, snails, curried lamb, fish with sorrel or Comté. 

 

2016 


CHABLIS 

 



2016 

CHABLIS – ½ bottle 

 

2015 



CHABLIS 1er CRU “FOURNEAUX” 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

The famous spring icicle harvest of Chablis.  

 

 

 



 

 - 173 - 



REGION DE CHABLIS 

Continued… 

 

“The year listed on the bottle is not an expiration date – so that 1997 wine is safe to drink”.  



Frasier 

 

 



ALICE & OLIVIER DE MOOR, Chablis – Organic 

Who are those “masked harvesters”, kemo sabe? Alice & Olivier de Moor, that’s who. Typical of the warm nature of the 

vintage this is a light golden Chablis fermented in old barrels with a certain waxy texture in the mouth and notes of dry honey, 

ginger-spiked butter and cinnamon-spiced apples. The De Moors are one of the few growers who work organically and 

without sulphur in the Chablis region. Hi-ho, Sulphur and away! Fermented and aged in old oak the 1902 is Aligoté to age, 

extremely tight and high in stony acidity with citrus fruits and herbal aromas, very dense and long. This winespeak does not 

do justice to a wine which shimmers with authority – it has dense - or intense - transparency in the way that only wines with 

“perfect pitch” acidity can seem to glisten. Then the nose – glacier water buffing up a river stone, gorse flowers drenched 

with sea spray, all nostril-arching brilliance and then into the palate - linear, citric (juice plus pith), tears-of-chalk-stony, with 

tensile strength and just a smattering of lees spice. Liquid steel, this wine is an exhilarating skate across the palate. To coin a 

phrase, it takes you hither and Yonne. 

 

2015 


BOURGOGNE-ALIGOTE  

 



2015 

BOURGOGNE-ALIGOTE “PLANTATION 1902” 

 

2015 



BOURGOGNE-CHITRY BLANC 

 



2015 

CHABLIS “VENDANGEUR MASQUE” 

 

2015 



CHABLIS “L’HUMEUR DU TEMPS” 

 



2015 

CHABLIS “COTEAU DE LA ROSETE” 

 

 



 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling