Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet64/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   ...   87

IN THE CANNONAU’S MOUTH 

 

The origins and provenance of the Cannonau variety are still not known with absolute certainty but it is generally agreed that it appeared 



on Sardinia, having been brought from Spain, in the 14

th

 century at the beginning of the period of Spanish domination of the island. 



Numerous experts argue that Cannonau corresponds from an ampelographical standpoint with the Canonazo of Seville and the Granaxa of 

Aragon.  

 

Cannonau found an ideal habitat on Sardinia and the local growers were so favourable to it that it soon spread to every part of the island. 



Eventually, it was being grown on about 20 per cent of the island surface planted in vines. Despite the considerable diffusion of the 

variety, the amount of Cannonau wine produced is rather limited because of the widespread practice of short-pruning as part of the 

alberello system of training the vines. That practice drastically curtails output, which in the provinces of Nuoro and Sassari averages 

about 30 to 40 quintals per hectare as opposed to the more than 100 quintals permitted under the production discipline with normal 

pruning. Gradually, however, the alberello system is being replaced by the espalier technique, which results in a wine with a lower level 

of alcohol, one that is perhaps less formidable but is clearly much more drinkable. 

 


 

 - 292 - 

 

 

SARDEGNA 

Continued… 



 

 

 



AA PANEVINO, GIANFRANCO MANCA, NURA, Sardegna – Organic 

Pull up an armchair and warm your interest in wine at the crackling fire of extreme passion. This is the story of 

Gianfranco Manca, formerly a baker, who, having taken over his uncle’s bakery made delicious, prize-worthy Sardinian 

breads. 

 

With the bakery there also came some plots of land with some very old vines that had somehow remained although practically 

neglected for years. Panevino – you can see where I am going with this. The vines were trained in alberello (goblet), the 

traditional bush-system used on the islands of Italy, numbered over thirty different varieties, but mainly Cannonau. Since he 

was already an expert at fermentation with bread, Gianfranco believed the natural progression would be to understand wine 

fermentation with the help of these vines. He set about rehabilitating the old vines and planted a parcel of new vines of Monica 

and Carignano del Sulcis, the local strain of the famous grape. Although he started making wine in the mid 80’s it wasn’t until 

2005 that he was ready to put a label on it and offer his interpretation to the rest of the world. “Following the steps of my 

family that lives the vineyard life since over a century, “panevino” (“breadwine”) is born. Why panevino? Panevino is the 

essence, the essential, simplicity, daily life, celebration, truth: Daily life turned into celebration, celebration every day. All that 

I bring it with me in the vineyard, I hoe it, prune it… The vineyard returns it in the shape of a few concentrated grape bunches. 

The vineyard is the heart of our farm’s activity; it covers five hectares, the rest of our life laboratory is made of olive trees

corn, vegetables and legumes”. 

 

The vineyards are on exposed windy slopes with schist and limestone at five hundred metres altitude and are subject to 

dramatic temperature fluctuations. Minimal intervention is the watchword – one treatment only with sulphur and lime, no 

fertilizers (other than what the donkey might release something once in a while!) The same principles apply throughout the 

winemaking process: manual harvest of grapes in small boxes, no fining, clarification, acidification or deacidification in the 

cellar. “We use only GRAPES (and prayers”) 

 

Gianfranco Manco, makes what nature gives him in each vintage. The whys and wherefores are irrelevant, you won’t prise 

technical information from him – even with a special crowbar designed for the task. Suffice to say 2013 Rosso Chi No Nau is a 

Cannonau from centenarian vines and the 2013 Rosso Pikade is a blend of the gentler Monica plus Carignano. No sulphur in 

these wines. Su chi no nau (what I do not say), a play on words with the name of its grape variety: Cannonau. What’s in a 

name? This is a celebration of wine silence, that fantasy land where people simply enjoy wine for the sheer pleasure of it, 

without the usual hot and cold running commentary, without getting mired in technical detail or lumpen semantics. 

 

 

Alvas is an extraordinary white wine made with extended skin maceration (eighteen days). The motley cast of fragrant and 

spicy varieties features Retallada, Vernaccia, Nuragus, Seminano, Vermentino, Malvasia and Nasco. Nuragus has an 

interesting provenance: some experts believe that it was brought to the island during the XII century B.C. by Phoenicians; 

others believe that it’s a native variety because its name is similar to the famous 292elabelin stone construction of Nuraghi. 

It’s always been a resistant and adaptable variety and a good yielder: for this reason it is also known as “pagadeppidus”(pay 

debts), “preni tineddus”(fill up vats), and “uva de is paberus”(poor man’s grapes). Alvas (meaning white – ha) is hazy-amber 

with a subtle nose of orange flowers, verbena, ricard and apricot skin. The wine smells warm, like bread dough just taken out 

of the oven. Smooth in the mouth the wine picks up notes of apricot jam, ginger and white pepper (from the lees) as well as 

tannin and a faint nuttiness from the skin contact. In a word, Alvas is gorgeous. We drank it with baby squid stuffed with 

chorizo, pine nuts, sultanas, shallots and parsley on the first night and with a chicken, fennel, carrot and black olive stew on 

the second.  

 

 

2014 


PICCI ROSSO 

 



 

 

 


 

 - 293 - 



SICILIA 

 

Sicily’s history of colonization can be viewed by examining not only its architecture and language, but also its cuisine. The Greeks were 

the first to impose a culinary influence, and in a sense, Sicilian cooking is a microcosm of Italian cooking in general in that it absorbed 

and subsequently embellished such influences and developed a cuisine based on simple yet high quality local ingredients such as fish and 

vegetables. During the Arab colonization, nearly a thousand years later, new foods and new methods of cooking were introduced: the 

Saracens brought aubergines, spinach, bitter oranges, almonds, rice, apricots, sugar and sultanas as well as the techniques for making 

sorbet (sherbet). Next came the Normans with their methods of cooking, and of preserving fish and meat 

 

Pasta is extremely popular. It is dressed in a rich sauce and showered with grated pecorino or with salted ricotta (a local speciality). Pesto 



alla Trapanese is plum and sun-dried tomatoes pureed with garlic, almonds, basil, oregano and pecorino and served with pasta twists 

called casareccia. The wonderfully named Zogghiu is a refreshing amalgam of parsley, mint, balsamic vinegar and capers – delicious with 

lamb or skate. Fish and pasta is particular Sicilian marriage, the best-known example being pasta with sardines and fennel. Again there 

are innumerable local variants of this dish. The other favourite way to serve pasta is with vegetables, especially aubergines. As cookery 

writers never tire of telling us we can’t get the wonderful small round purple Sicilian aubergines in this country. Were we able to we 

would undoubtedly try to replicate Bellini’s masterpiece, pasta alla Norma, with aubergine, tomato and salted ricotta or caponata, an 

eggplant stew, which like rosé from a Mediterranean country, always tastes infinitely better in situ. 

 

Fish is plentiful and the markets teem with the fruit (di mare) of the Sicilian seas. Swordfish deserving of the barbecue lie down with 



octopus; mullet, striped mackerel, sardines and anchovies are plentiful. Fish may be steamed, grilled or baked, but simplicity is always 

observed in the preparation because the ingredient is king, a tenet laid down by the Syracusan Archestratus, whose 4

th

 century culinary 



notes predate those of Delia Smith as the earliest known to western civilization. 

 

Sicilian sorbets and ice creams and other dolce (such as cassata and pasta reale) are brilliant. Wonderful quality of fruit combined with 



proud tradition ensures their reputation. Pleasures to be enjoyed with the great sweet wines of Pantelleria.  

 

The wondrous Marsalas of Marco de Bartoli are not for the snappers up of unconsidered trifles. In fact, avoid the word trifle at all costs. 



These are glorious delicate nutty wines with needle-thread acidity and mellow warmth designed to sip and toast a Sicilian sunset. Or a 

Sydenham sunset. 



 

SICILIA 

Continued… 

 

 

 



CALEO, Sicilia 

Another of those fragrant fruity white wines that Sicily seems to specialise in, this Inzolia, (otherwise known as Ansonica in 

Tuscany) from vineyards near Trapani, is more than merely drinkable with notes of almonds, citrus fruits and fresh herbs. 

  

2016 


INZOLIA TERRE SICILIANE 

 



 

 

CIELLO, ALCAMO, Sicilia – Organic 

The dynamic Vesco family took over the winery 10 years ago and have since revolutionised the viticultural practices and 

invested heavily in cutting edge technology for the winery and bottling line. Their hundred hectares of organic vineyards are 

located high up in the hills above Alcamo. The wines are all certified organic and planted on south-east facing slopes on sandy 

soils 150 – 300m above sea level. The climate is clearly suited for producing the best quality grapes. The vineyards in three 

main sites: Alcamo for Catarratto and Nero d’Avola. The grapes tend to be picked earlier in the year than many of their 

neighbours which produces their customary bright, fresh style of wine. 

The results are evident in the Catarratto and perfumed, fresh Nero d’Avola. These wines are a million miles from the overripe 

styles made by many of their

 

peers. Night harvesting and modern temperature controlled fermentations result in bright, fresh, 



modern wines. Fragrant, crisp Catarratto with a pleasant trace of pink grapefruit, apple-skin with soft almond on the finish and 

soft, warmy and plummy Nero d’Avola with good character. The first bottling of the Ciello tends to have the lees in evident 

suspension, the wine be chalky-opaque, but the fresh has that just-off-the-tank freshness. Subsequent bottlings will be a mite less 

cloudy; what you gain in clarity you lose a touch in mouthfeel. 

 

The Baglio red is 100% Nero d’Avola from their organic vineyards. Short maceration of a week of whole bunch (40%) and 

destemmed (60%) grapes. Wild yeast, no sulphur, no fining, no filtration. Chewy plum character, herbal with peppery 

tannins. The white 100% Catarratto from their organic vineyard. 3 days skin maceration, no fining, no filtration, no 

sulphur. The colour here is amber, the fruit is warm and spicy and the palate is rich without being heavy. Tasted blind you 

might pick this as an orange from northern Italy, made from a noble grape. 

 

 

2016 


CIELLO BIANCO CATARRATTO TERRE SICILIANA 

 



2016 

BAGLIO BIANCO TERRE SICILIANA 

 

2016 



CIELLO ROSSO NERO D’AVOLA TERRE SICILIANA 

 



2016 

BAGLIO ROSSO TERRE SICILIANA 

 

2016 



CIELLO ROSATO 

Ro 


 

 

 - 294 - 

 

SICILIA 

Continued… 



 

 

 



MARCO DE BARTOLI, MARSALA, Sicilia 

Marco De Bartoli is considered one of Sicily’s winemaking pioneers for his long-standing commitment to the native 

Sicilian white grape varieties, Grillo and Zibibbo. He produces them on two separate estates: the first in Marsala, in 

Sicily’s south-west corner, the other on the small island of Pantelleria, south-east of Sicily. His belief in the value of 

traditional methods of production of these grapes and their wines is complemented by his equally strong belief in the 

future of Sicily as one of Europe’s most vital viticultural areas. Grillo, which historically forms the basis of Marsala’s 

classic wines, has been grown on the island since Phoenician times. From his Samperi winery, in the Contrada Samperi 

just west of Marsala, Marco De Bartoli produces several wines from this grape. “Vecchio Samperi” was first made in 

1980. Named for the territory that houses De Bartoli’s country estate, it is a prestigious “Vergine” wine made using the 

traditional solera method, in which small quantities of young wine are added to wines of older vintages as they pass 

through a sequence of wooden barrels. The complex, harmonious result celebrates the fruit of many harvests. 

In 1982 De Bartoli created “Vigna La Miccia”, classified as an “Oro” or gold Marsala, which is a sweeter, fresher 

dessert wine produced using a cold vinification process; it reveals an intense bouquet of Grillo and Inzolia grapes. 

Another facet of Marco De Bartoli’s work with Grillo led in 1983 to the “Marsala Superiore”, which is aged in oak 

barrels and fortified, as tradition would have it, with the “mistella” alcohol derived from must of Inzolia and acqua vite. 

In 1992 Marco De Bartoli added “Grappoli del Grillo” to his collection: here Grillo is vinified as a dry white table wine, 

with its unmistakable character of Mediterranean spice.  

 

Pietra Nera is an aromatic dry wine made from 100% Zibibbo (better known as Muscat of Alexandria); it is delicate, 

attractive and alluring and would make good company with fish soup, sarde a beccafico, grilled bream or cous-cous.  

Like so many of our producers de Bartoli are trying to rediscover the natural flavour of wine using native yeasts and low 

sulphur during the vinification. Out of this ambition was born the Integer wines. One’s initial impression is of the 

uncompromising purity of the wine in the mouth – no corners have been cut, no corners of the palate will remain 

unchallenged by the wine. As Eric might say: “The Integer wines will knock you on your ass” (technical winespeak – I will 

explain later). 

 

Made from sun-dried Moscato, Bukkuram is a wine of orange blossom, apricot and honey. Legend has it that Apollo 

himself was successfully wooed by the goddess of love, Tanit, when she substituted Moscato from the volcanic island of 

Pantelleria for his daily ambrosia. 

  

2014 


TERZAVIA BRUT NATURE ~ Grillo 

Sp 


 

2016 


PIETRA NERA ~ Zibibbo 

 



2016 

VIGNAVERDE – Grillo 

 

2014 



GRILLO INTEGER  

 



2015 

ZIBIBBO INTEGER 

 

2013 



PASSITO DI PANTELLERIA BUKKURAM SOLE D’AGOSTO – 50 cl 

Sw 


 

 

 

 

 

 - 295 - 



 

Looking soiled and crumpled, like the Roman Emperor who has sat up too late over the Falernian wine.  

 

MARCO DE BARTOLI, MARSALA, Sicilia continued… 

Vecchio Samperi, an example of the rare Vergine/Soleras style mentioned above, is aged using the fractional blending method known 

as solera, made famous in Jerez. Using a battery of progressively smaller casks, De Bartoli continually “tops up” his oldest wines 

with wines from the next-oldest vintage, with the newest wines going in the largest cask at the end of the battery. Vecchio Samperi is 

more than 40 years old, with the smoky, nutty complexity of a fine sherry. But Vecchio Samperi is unfortified, just as all Marsala was 

before the British came along towards the end of the 18

th

 century and added spirit to it. The wine (from Grillo again) is dry, intense 

and mellow with flavours of chestnuts, Brazil nuts and orange peel. Try it with aged pecorino cheeses, or maybe slightly chilled 

alongside some shellfish or other seafood as an aperitif. It is a rare treasure in the world of wine and is described by Marco as a 

“Vino Liquoroso secco”. 

 

For decades, the most famous wine exports of Sicily were the sherry-like fortified wines of Marsala, named after the Moroccan-accented 

port town on the island’s west coast. The wines of Marsala, which have been banished to the kitchen in recent years, are perhaps the most 

vivid examples of the myriad ethnic influences that shape Sicily’s culture and cuisine. The name Marsala, for example, is thought to be 

derived from the Arab phrase “Marsah-el-Allah,” or, “port of God,” a name likely bestowed on by the island’s Moorish rulers centuries 

ago.  

 

Marsala wine was first commercialised by the British, who, as in Jerez in Spain and Oporto in Portugal, created wines that could 

withstand long sea journeys by fortifying them with grape brandy. At its most basic, Marsala, like sherry, is a fortified wine made from 

white grapes (although there are some versions made from red varieties). And like sherry, Marsala is as stylistically diverse as wines 

come: It can by dry, semi-sweet, or sweet, and it comes in “oro” (gold), “ambra” (“amber”) and “rubino” (ruby) versions. There are 

also different age categories: Fine (aged only a year, not necessarily in wood); Superiore (aged a minimum of two years in oak or 

chestnut, and four years for Superiore Riserva); and Vergine/Soleras (aged a minimum of five years in wood and a minimum of ten for 

those labelled “Stravecchio” or “Riserva”). 

 

 



NV 

VECCHIO SAMPERI VENTENNALE – 50cl 

 

NV 



MARSALA SUPERIORE ORO “VIGNA LA MICCIA” – 50 cl 

Sw 


 

NV 


MARSALA SUPERIORE 10 YEAR OLD – 50cl 

Sw 


 

1987 


MARSALA SUPERIORE – 50 cl 

Sw 


 

 

AA CARAVAGLIO, ANTONINO CARAVAGLIO, Salina – Organic 

Nature is an aeolian harp, a musical instrument whose tones are the re-echo of higher things within us. (Novalis) 



The history of artisanal winemaking in the Aeolian Islands off the coast of Sicilia essentially begins with five Spanish families, one of 

which is Caravaglio. These noble pioneers were invited to travel to these wild, volcanic islands in the early 1500s to develop agriculture. 

Thus, for more than 500 years, the Caravaglios have cultivated wine grapes on Salina and Lipari, establishing early on the traditions and 

practices that would be followed for generations. Antonino Caravaglio’s ancestors were certainly among the first to partner with 

Venetian traders bearing rootstock from Greece, planting the original Malvasia delle Lipari and Corinto Nero vines. 

Few vine-growing regions in the world can claim such an unbroken chain of organic cultivation. Grapes on these wind-swept hills have 

always been cared for naturally, cleansed by the sea-salty air of the Mediterranean and protected by the island’s mineral soils, which 

also kept phylloxera at bay. 

 

Antonino Caravaglio was among the first artisans in Sicily to become organically certified in the 1990s; historically, his family’s vines 

and caper plants for centuries have been farmed according to organic principles. Grapes are harvested by hand and fermented with 

indigenous yeasts in temperature-controlled, stainless steel tanks. White wines are aged in tank on fine lees for two to three months; red 

wines are aged on fine lees in a combination of 500L French oak casks and tank for one month. Very little sulphur is added during the 

winemaking process, to ensure the grapes’ natural flavours are allowed to express themselves fully. 

 

The Malvasia Salina is from organic vines grown in volcanic soils. Beautiful, dry, aromatic white wine with peach blossoms, lemon zest, 

spring flowers, grapefruit, green melon and mouth-watering acidity. 

 

Occhio di Terra Salina is Malvasia delle Lipari, Nerello Mascalese and Catarratto. This wine is fermented with native yeasts only and 

rests on its skins for a period of time gaining colour and tannic structure. The ageing takes place in terracotta amphorae for 6 months. A 

variety of aromas emerge from this wine: chamomile, herbs (basil, rosemary, dried mint), followed by ripe yellow pulpy fruit such as 

loquat and mango. A tangy wine, supremely satisfying with a long persistence in the mouth and a wine that ticks so many of our nerdy 

boxes:  

Made from old Corinto Nero and Nerello Mascalese from the islands of Lipari and Salina, the Salina Rosso spends just two days on skins 

to derive its dark pink/ruby red vivid colour. The aroma expresses wild roses and black cherry scents, the wine is brilliant and clear in the 

glass. In the mouth there is a distinctive savoury presence, almost a smoky quality and perky red fruit flavours. 

 

2016 



OCCHIO DI TERRA MALVASIA SECCO SALINA IGT 

 



2016 

OCCHIO DI TERRA SALINA 

 

2016 



OCCHIO DI TERRA ROSSO “ROSSONOROSSO” 

 



 

 - 296 - 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling