Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet23/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   63

CONCLUSIONS:  Enhanced  efforts to prevent and control overweight from 

childhood is a critical national priority, even in developing countries. To be 

successful, social, cultural and economic influences should be considered. 

 

Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2003 Apr;13(2):64-71. 



Gender  Differences  in  Dietary  Intakes,  Anthropometrical 

Measurements and Biochemical Indices in an Urban Adult 

Population: the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. 

Mirmiran P, Mohammadi F, Sarbazi N, Allahverdian S, Azizi F. 

Endocrine  Research  Center,  Shaheed  Beheshti  University  of  Medical 

Sciences, Tehran, I.R. Iran. 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND  AND  AIM:    In  order  to  investigate  gender  differences  in 

health  indices,  dietary  intakes  and  obesity  in  urban  Iranian  adults,  we 

considered  a  sub-sample  of  the  adult  population  of  the  Tehran  Lipid  and 

Glucose Study. 



METHODS AND  RESULTS:  The  randomly selected  sub-sample consisted  of 

483  subjects  aged  25-50  years  (229  men  and  254  women)  and  153  aged 

more  than  50  years  (81  men  and  72  women).  Their  anthropometrical 

variables  were  recorded,  and  their  body  mass  index  (BMI)  and  waist/hip 

ratio  were  calculated.  Dietary  intake  was  assessed  by  means  of  two-day 

dietary  recall  and  the  completion  of  dietary  habit  questionnaires  during 

face-to-face  interviews.  Underreporting  was  defined  as  a  ratio  of  energy 

intake (EI)/basal metabolic rate (BMR) < 1.27. The mean BMI of the women 

in both age groups was significantly higher than that of the men (p < 0.05). 

Central  obesity  was  more  frequent  in  the  women  and  among  older 

subjects.  The  women  had  higher  plasma  concentrations  of  high-density 


268 

 

 



lipoprotein cholesterol, but lower levels of total and low-density lipoprotein 

cholesterol. Underreporting of EI was more frequent in the women than the 

men: 34.0% vs 15.4% in the younger group, and 40.3% vs 17.3% in the older 

group  (p  <  0.01).  There  were  major  gender  differences  in  the  mean  daily 

intakes  of  energy,  protein,  carbohydrate,  fat,  fibre,  cholesterol,  iron, 

calcium  and  phosphorus.  A  higher  proportion  of  women  met  the 

cholesterol  intake  guidelines.  Data  from  the  dietary  habit  questionnaires 

showed that more men than women usually sprinkle salt on their food. 



CONCLUSIONS:  The results of this study partially support the hypothesis of 

gender  differences  in  dietary  intakes,  and  the  prevalence  of  obesity  and 

some  health-related  indices,  and  suggest  the  need  for  gender-specific, 

targeted  nutrition  messages  and  behavioural  interventions  in  developing 

prevention strategies for cardiovascular risk factors. 

 

Ann Hum Biol. 2003 Mar-Apr;30(2):191-202. 



Sizes  and  Obesity  Pattern  of  South  Iranian  Adolescent 

Females. 

Ayatollahi SM. 

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Shiraz University of Medical 

Sciences, Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran. biostat@pearl.sums.ac.ir 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:  Sizes (height and weight) and obesity (a scaled weight-by-

height index) charts of a representa ve sample of 1,743 healthy adolescent 

females of Shiraz (Southern Iran) aged 11-17 years are presented. 

METHODS:    An  adjusted  weight-for-height  was  used  to  define  a  possible 

obesity index. Polynomial modelling was used by applying the HRY (Healy, 

Rasbash,  Yang)  nonparametric  method  to  estimate  age-related  smoothed 

centiles of sizes and obesity. 



RESULTS:    A  ponderal  index  in  the  form  of  weight/height(3)  represented 

obesity  better  than  any  other  index  which  is  logically  related  to 

weight/volume  and  enjoys  biological  justification.  No  more  than  cubic 

polynomials were needed to fit height-for-age, weight-for-age, obesity-for-

age  and  weight-for-height  smoothly.  The  10th,  75th  and  97th  cen les  of 

height and weight of our subjects lie on the 3rd, median and 90th cen les 

of  the  NCHS  standard,  respectively.  Obesity  pattern  increases  with  age, 

giving  an  appropriate  index  to  study  obesity  of  female  adolescents. 



269 

 

 



However, weight-for-height chart independent of age range of subjects may 

serve as an alternative. 



CONCLUSION:    It  is  concluded  that  the  ponderal  index  is  an  appropriate 

index  to  study  obesity  of  adolescent  females,  and  is  a  simple  one  that  is 

biologically plausible. However, other indices such as weight-for-height may 

be  considered  as  an  alternative.  A  local  standard  for  assessing  sizes  and 

obesity  of  adolescent  females  is  recommended  for  clinical  as  well  as 

community health purposes in Iran. 

 

JQUMS 2003, 7(2): 27-35 



Heathy Heard Program : Obesity in Center of Iran 

A Akhavan Tabib 

*

, B Sabet, HR Toluei, A Baghaei, R Kelishadie and GH Sadri  



Abstract 

BACKGROUND: Obesity is one of the important hygienic problems of both 

industrial and developing countries. 



OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obesity in two groups of men 

and women. 



METHODS:  Through  a  cross-  sec onal  study  12600  people  from  Isfahan, 

Najaf-Abad  and  Arak  provinces  were  studied  in  Isfahan  Healthy  Heart 

Program  (in  2000  –  2002).  Two  equal  ra os  of  both  sexes  were  selected 

using  random  -  clustering  sampling.  A  questionnaire  consisting 

demographic  formation  and  also  clinical  information  such  as  Weight, 

height, waistand hip circumference was filled out for each person. 



FINDINGS: In this study 23/44 ± 1/9% of all studied women and 9/28 ± 1/7% 

of all studied men had BMI > 30 and 33/33 ± 2/4% of women and 30/28 ± 

20% of men had BMI >25. On the other hand 39/05 ± 2/61% of all women 

and 55/02 ± 2/73% of all men had normal BMI. This ra o was 43/25 ± 3/5% 

and 34/9 ± 1/7% for rural and urban women respectively. Also the highest 

rate of waist and hip circumferences was seen in men aged > 66 years (94/2 

± 11/2% and 99/8 ± 8/9% respec vely). While in women the highest rate of 

hip  circumference  is  104/22%  ±  10/9%  in  age  group  35-44  years  and  the 

highest rate of waist circumference is 98/00% ± 13% that was seen in 45-54 

and 55- 64 years.  

 

 


270 

 

 



CONCLUSION:  Every  program  of  nutrition  and  life  style  for  all  age  groups 

should be done similarly in both sexes.The lack of difference of BMI in rural 

and urban areas was because of the  fact that they did not live  differently 

and jnst in Arak which mostly had a traditional context, a small difference 

was seen. 

 

Public Health Nutr. 2002 Feb;5(1A):149-55. 



An Accelerated Nutrition Transition in Iran. 

Ghassemi H, Harrison G, Mohammad K. 

National  Study  on  Food  and  Nutrition  Security  in  Iran,  Shahrak  Ghods, 

Tehran. gailh@ucla.edu 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To  describe  the  emergence  of  the  nutrition  transition,  and 

associated morbidity shifts, in the Islamic Republic of Iran. 



DESIGN:    Review  and  analysis  of  secondary  data  relating  to  the  socio-

political  and  nutritional  context,  demographic  trends,  food  utilisation  and 

consumption patterns, obesity, and diet-related morbidity. 

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:  The  nutrition transition in Iran  is  occurring 

rapidly, secondary to the rapid change in fertility and mortality patterns and 

to urbanisation. The transition is occurring against the backdrop of lack of 

sustained  economic  growth.  There  is  considerable  imbalance  in  food 

consumption  with  low  nutrient  density  characterising  diets  at  all  income 

levels, over-consumption evident among more than a third of households, 

and food insecurity among  20% of the popula on. Obesity is an emerging 

problem, particularly in urban areas and for women, and both diabetes and 

other risk factors for heart disease are becoming significant problems. 


271 

 

 



Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Dec;26(12):1617-22. 

Familial  Clustering  Of  Obesity  and  the  Role  of  Nutrition: 

Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. 

Mirmiran P, Mirbolooki M, Azizi F. 

Endocrine  Research  Center,  Shaheed  Beheshti  University  of  Medical 

Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  clarify  the  hypothesis  that  parent's  dietary  intakes  are 

associated with their offspring's body mass index. 



DESIGN:  Observational analytical cross-sectional survey among inhabitants 

of district 13 in the east of Tehran. 



SUBJECTS:  A total of 117 healthy families comprising 474 subjects including 

240 offspring (3-25 y old). 



MEASUREMENTS:    Weight  and  height  were  measured  by  a  standard 

protocol  and  body  mass  index  (kg/m(2))  was  calculated.  Dietary  intakes 

were assessed by means of a 2 day dietary recall ques onnaire. 

RESULTS:  The prevalence of overweight was 11.8% in offspring of normal-

weight parents, 19.0% in offspring of overweight fathers and normal-weight 

mothers,  25.4%  in  offspring  of  overweight  mothers  and  normal-weight 

fathers  and  40.8%  in  offspring  with  both  parents  overweight.  The 

Offspring's overweight was significantly and independently associated with 

high-energy  intake  of  both  parents  (odds  ra o;  95%  CI  2.7;  1.6-4.5). 

Adjusted for the sex of parents, the chances of offspring being overweight 

were  higher  in  overweight  (3.8;  1.5-9.2)  and  high-energy-intake  mothers 

(2.6; 1.2-5.6) and high-energy-intake fathers (2.0; 1.1-3.9) as compared with 

children  of  normal-weight  parents.  High  fat  intake  of  husbands  was  an 

independent  risk  factor  increasing  the  chances  of  their  wives  being 

overweight (2.1; 1.5-3.6) and vice versa (1.8; 1.2-2.8). 



CONCLUSION:    The  observed  familial  obesity  pattern  was  shown  to  be 

associated  with  the  familial  dietary  intakes.  Hence,  familial  intervention 

seems essential to stop the accelerated rise in the prevalence of overweight 

and obesity in our community. 



272 

 

 



Arch Dis Child. 2002 Nov;87(5):388-91; discussion 388-91. 

Obesity in Iranian Children. 

Dorosty AR, Siassi F, Reilly JJ. 

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, UK. 

Abstract 

We surveyed 4315 2-5 year olds in Iran. Prevalence of obesity (BMI >95th 

centile,  Iranian  reference  data)  was  compared  with  the  recent  "IOTF" 

approach. Prevalence was significantly higher than expected, and increased 

with age, but contradictory trends were obtained from the two approaches. 

Monitoring  of  childhood  obesity  using  the  BMI  in  developing  countries  is 

indicated,  but  differences  associated  with  obesity  definition  should  be 

considered. 

 

PAYESH, OCTOBER 2002; 1(4):15-19. 



Prevalence  of  Obesity  and  Overweight  in  Primary  School 

Girls in Tehran, Iran 

MOZAFARY H.*,NABAIEE B. 

* Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of 

Medical Science, Tehran, Iran 



OBJECTIVE(S):    The  rising  trends  of  obesity  in  children  are  reflected  in 

increased adult obesity and related morbidity. So we studied the prevalence 

of obesity in children and the related factors in Tehran. 

MATERIAL  &  METHODS:    This  was  a  cross-sectional  study  of  1800  female 

pupils. Weight and height were measured and BMI (Body Mass Index) was 

calculated. SPSS-IO was used for statistical analysis. 

RESULTS:  Prevalence of obesity and overweight were 7.7 percent (95%CI= 

6.25%  -  9.3%)  and  13.3  percent  (95%CI=  11.76%  -  14.95%),  respec vely. 

There was a significant correla on between obesity and age (P=0.01), type 

of school (P=0.002), appearance (P<0.001) and self-image (P<0.001). 



CONCLUSION:    The  findings  necessitate  interventional  programs  for 

identification and treatment of obese children. 

 

 


273 

 

 



Public Health Nutr. 2002 Feb;5(1A):149-55. 

An Accelerated Nutrition Transition in Iran. 

Ghassemi H, Harrison G, Mohammad K. 

National  Study  on  Food  and  Nutrition  Security  in  Iran,  Shahrak  Ghods, 

Tehran. gailh@ucla.edu 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  describe  the  emergence  of  the  nutrition  transition,  and 

associated morbidity shifts, in the Islamic Republic of Iran. 



DESIGN:    Review  and  analysis  of  secondary  data  relating  to  the  socio-

political  and  nutritional  context,  demographic  trends,  food  utilisation  and 

consumption patterns, obesity, and diet-related morbidity. 

 

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:  The  nutrition transition in Iran  is  occurring 

rapidly, secondary to the rapid change in fertility and mortality patterns and 

to urbanisation. The transition is occurring against the backdrop of lack of 

sustained  economic  growth.  There  is  considerable  imbalance  in  food 

consumption  with  low  nutrient  density  characterising  diets  at  all  income 

levels, over-consumption evident among more than a third of households, 

and food insecurity among 20% of the popula on. Obesity is an emerging 

problem, particularly in urban areas and for women, and both diabetes and 

other risk factors for heart disease are becoming significant problems. 

 

East Mediterr Health J. 2001 Jan-Mar;7(1-2):163-70. 



Pattern  of  Dietary  Behaviour  and  Obesity  In  Ahwaz, 

Islamic Republic Of Iran. 

Soori H. 

Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Ahwaz University 

of Medical Sciences, Ahwaz, Islamic Republic of Iran. 



Abstract 

To  study  behavioural  factors  associated  with  diet  and  to  investigate  body 

mass index distribution, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in Ahwaz. 

A composite dietary behaviour score obtained from self-reported responses 

to  a  24-item  food-frequency  questionnaire  was  used  to  categorize  eating 

habits  as  more/less  healthy.  Responders  were  1600  heads  of  households 



274 

 

 



from 150,000 randomly selected residences. Less healthy diets were shown 

to  be  associated  with  age  and  economic  status,  and  greater  obesity  with 

women and age (reversed a er ages > 65 years). Interven ons targeted at 

less  healthy  eaters  need  to  be  evidence-based,  and  further  research  into 

factors  determining  access  to  healthy  diets  in  developing  communities  is 

required. 

 

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2001 Mar;71(2):123-7. 



Dietary Factors and Body Mass Index in a Group of Iranian 

Adolescents: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study--2. 

Azizi F, Allahverdian S, Mirmiran P, Rahmani M, Mohammadi F. 

Endocrine  Research  Centre,  Shaheed  Beheshti  University  of  Medical 

Sciences, Tehran, I.R. Iran. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  study  the  prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity  in  an 

adolescent population in Tehran and to determine possible association with 

energy and nutrient intake and distribution of energy over the day. 

METHOD: A cross-sec onal study on 177 boys and 244 girls between 10-19 

years  old  was  performed.  Overweight  and  obesity  were  defined  by  using 

recommended body mass index (BMI) cut-off values for adolescents. Total 

energy  intake,  percent  of  energy  derived  from  protein,  carbohydrate  and 

fat and percent of energy supplied by each meal and snack were assessed 

by means of two 24-hour dietary recalls. 



RESULTS:  Prevalence of overweight and obesity was 10.7 and 5.1 in boys 

and  18.4  and  2.8  in  girls,  respec vely.  The  composi on  of  diet  was  not 

different between overweight/obese and normal weight subjects. BMI was 

related with breakfast energy percentage in girls (r = -0.18, p < 0.01), with 

total  energy  intake  in  boys  (r  =  0.23,  p  <  0.01),  and  with  lunch  energy 

percentage in both sexes. In boys (r = 0.16, p < 0.05) and in girls (r = 0.22, p 



< 0.01). 

CONCLUSION:      High  prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity  among 

adolescents  was  seen.  In  boys  some  relationship  between  total  energy 

intake, distribution of energy over the day and BMI was seen. In girls BMI 

was only related with distribution of energy over the day. 

 

 


275 

 

 



 

IRAQ 

Prev Med. 2011 Sep 1;53(3):149-54. Epub 2011 Jul 13. 



BMI  Trajectory  Groups  in  Veterans  of  the  Iraq  and 

Afghanistan Wars  

Patricia  H.  Rosenberger

,  Yuming  Ning,  Cynthia  Brandt,  Heather  Allore, 



Sally Haskell 

VA Connecticut Healthcare  System, West  Haven, CT,  USA; Department  of 

Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, USA. 

Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  The  study  sought  to  determine  BMI  trajectories  in 

Iraq/Afghanistan  veterans  over  6 years  and  to  examine  sociodemographic 

factors associated with BMI trajectory membership. 

METHODS:  Our  study  sample  included  16,656  veterans  post-deployment 

and  entering  the  Veteran  Healthcare  Administration  (VHA)  healthcare 

system.  We  used  national  VHA  administrative  sociodemographic  data, 

tracked  veteran  BMI  for  6 years,  and  used  trajectory  modeling  to  identify 

BMI  trajectories  and  sociodemographic  characteristics  associated  with 

trajectory membership. 



RESULTS:  Five  trajectory  groups  determined  in  the  full  sample  were 

primarily  differentiated  by  their  post-deployment  initial  BMI:  "healthy" 

(14.1%),  "overweight"  (36.3%),  "borderline  obese"  (27.9%),  "obese" 

(15.7%), and "severely obese" (6.0). Being female, younger, and white were 

associated  with  lower  initial  BMI  trajectory  group  membership  (p's < .05). 

Greater  observed  BMI  increase  was  associated  with  higher  initial  BMI 

across  groups  (0.6,  0.8,  1.5,  1.9,  2.7).  Gender  specific  trajectory  models 

found that male Veterans with higher education and white female Veterans 

were associated with the lowest initial BMI group (p's < .05). 

CONCLUSIONS:  Higher  post-deployment  BMI  was  associated  with  greater 

BMI  gain  over  time  for  both  male  and  female  veterans.  Older  age  is 

associated with higher BMI regardless of gender. Education level and racial 

status are differentially related to BMI trajectory by gender. 

 

 


276 

 

 



Mil Med. 2011 Feb;176(2):151-5. 

Assessment  Of  Rates  Of  Overweight  And  Obesity  And 

Symptoms  Of  Posttraumatic  Stress  Disorder  And 

Depression  In  A  Sample  Of  Operation  Enduring 

Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans. 

Barber J, Bayer L, Pietrzak RH, Sanders KA. 

VA  Connec cut  Healthcare  System,  Psychology  Service,  950  Campbell 

Avenue, 116B, West Haven, CT 06516, USA. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE: We  examined  rates  of  overweight and  obesity  in  a  sample  of 

Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans setting up 

rou ne  care  within  1  Veterans  Affairs  medical  center  and  examined 

associations between weight and measures of symptoms of posttraumatic 

stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. 

METHODS: Retrospective chart reviews were conducted to collect data on 

weight and symptoms of PTSD and depression. 



RESULTS:  Mean  body  mass  index  (=27  kg/m2,  SD  =  4.47)  was  within  the 

overweight range. Veterans had rates of overweight that were higher than 

those  of  national  samples  of  individuals  in  the  same  age  group,  but  had 

lower rates of obesity. Measures of symptoms of PTSD and depression were 

not associated with weight. 

CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of individuals in this group of Operation 

Enduring  Freedom/Operation  Iraqi  Freedom  Veterans  is  overweight  with 

rates consistent with the larger active duty population. Overweight was not 

associated with psychological distress. These data raise concerns for long-

term problems with weight in this group of Veterans. 


277 

 

 



J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Feb;19(2):267-71. 

Gender  Differences  In  Rates  Of  Depression,  PTSD,  Pain, 

Obesity,  And  Military  Sexual  Trauma  Among  Connecticut 

War Veterans Of Iraq And Afghanistan. 

Haskell SG, Gordon KS, Mattocks K, Duggal M, Erdos J, Justice A, Brandt CA. 

Department  of  Medicine,  Section  of  General  Internal  Medicine,  VA 

Connecticut  Healthcare  System,  New  Haven,  Connec cut  06516,  USA. 

sally.haskell@va.gov 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling