Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet63/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63

Optimal  Cut-Points  for  Body  Mass  Index,  Waist 

Circumference  and  Waist-To-Hip  Ratio  Using  the 

Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score in an Arab 

Population of the Middle East. 

Al-Lawati JA, Barakat NM, Al-Lawati AM, Mohammed AJ. 



Abstract 

We  aimed  to  determine  the  gender-specific  optimal  cut-points  for  body 

mass index (BMI),  waist circumference (WC)  and waist-to-hip ratio  (WHR) 

associated with risk of cardiovascular disease, using Framingham risk score 

and  receiver-operating  characteristic  (ROC)  analysis,  among  Omani  Arabs. 

Nine  percent  of  men,  compared  to  3%  of  women,  had  a  10-year  total 

coronary heart disease (CHD) risk > or = 20%. In both genders, WHR was a 

be er predictor of CHD (area under the ROC curve 0.771 for men and 0.802 

for women), followed by WC (0.710 and 0.727) and BMI (0.601 and 0.639), 

respec vely. For a 10-year CHD risk of > or = 20%, the op mal cut-points to 

assess adiposity in Omani men and women were > 22.6 and 22.9 kg/m2 for 

BMI,  >  78.5  and  84.5  cm  for  WC,  and  >  0.96  and  >  0.98  for  WHR, 

respectively.  To  identify  obesity  among  Omani  Arabs,  different  cut-points 

for BMI, WC and WHR than the currently recommended ones are needed. 

 

 

 



 

 


700 

 

 



 

J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Nov;93(11 Suppl 1):S9-30. 



Obesity  and  the  Metabolic  Syndrome  in  Developing 

Countries. 

Misra A, Khurana L. 

Department of Diabetes and Metabolic  Diseases, Fortis Flt. Lt. Rajan Dhall 

Hospital, 

Vasant 

Kunj, 


New 

Delhi 


110070, 

India. 


anoopmisra@metabolicresearchindia.com 

Abstract 

CONTEXT:    Prevalence  of  obesity  and  the  metabolic  syndrome  is  rapidly 

increasing  in  developing  countries,  leading  to  increased  morbidity  and 

mortality  due  to  type  2  diabetes  mellitus  (T2DM)  and  cardiovascular 

disease.EVIDENCE  ACQUISITION:    Literature  search  was  carried  out  using 

the  terms  obesity,  insulin  resistance,  the  metabolic  syndrome,  diabetes, 

dyslipidemia,  nutrition,  physical  activity,  and  developing  countries,  from 

PubMed  from  1966  to  June  2008  and  from  web  sites  and  published 

documents  of  the  World  Health  Organization  and  Food  and  Agricultural 

Organization. 

EVIDENCE  SYNTHESIS:    With  improvement  in  economic  situation  in 

developing  countries,  increasing  prevalence  of  obesity  and  the  metabolic 

syndrome is seen in adults and particularly in children. The main causes are 

increasing urbanization, nutrition transition, and reduced physical  activity. 

Furthermore,  aggressive  community  nutrition  intervention  programs  for 

undernourished  children  may  increase  obesity.  Some  evidence  suggests 

that  widely  prevalent  perinatal  undernutrition  and  childhood  catch-up 

obesity may play a role in adult-onset metabolic syndrome and T2DM. The 

economic  cost  of  obesity  and  related  diseases  in  developing  countries, 

having meager health budgets is enormous. 

CONCLUSIONS:    To  prevent  increasing  morbidity  and  mortality  due  to 

obesity-related  T2DM  and  cardiovascular  disease  in  developing  countries, 

there  is  an  urgent  need  to  initiate  large-scale  community  intervention 

programs focusing on increased physical activity and healthier food options, 

particularly  for  children.  International  health  agencies  and  respective 

government should intensively focus on primordial and primary prevention 

programs for obesity and the metabolic syndrome in developing countries. 

 


701 

 

 



East Mediterr Health J. 2007 Mar-Apr;13(2):430-40. 

Comparison  of  BMI-For-Age  in  Adolescent  Girls  in  3 

Countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region. 

Jackson RT, Rashed M, Al-Hamad N, Hwalla N, Al-Somaie M. 

Department  of  Nutrition  and  Food  Science,  University  of  Maryland, 

Maryland, USA. bojack@umd.edu 



Abstract 

International  comparisons  of  adolescent  overweight  and  obesity  are 

hampered  by  the  lack  of  a  single  agreed  measurement  reference.  We 

compared  3  BMI-for-age  references  on  samples  of  adolescent  girls  from 

Egypt, Kuwait and Lebanon. Overweight and obesity was highest in Kuwait 

and  lowest  in  Lebanon.  Performance  of  the  3  standards  differed  only 

slightly  although  one  was  particularly  applicable  in  country-to-country 

comparisons. 

 

2007;29:62-76. Epub 2007 May 3. 



Childhood  Overweight,  Obesity,  and  the  Metabolic 

Syndrome in Developing Countries. 

Kelishadi R. 

Department  of  Preventive  Pediatric  Cardiology,  Isfahan  Cardiovascular 

Research Center (WHO Collaborating Center), Isfahan University of Medical 

Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. kroya@aap.net 

Abstract 

The  incidence  of  chronic  disease  is  escalating  much  more  rapidly  in 

developing countries than in industrialized countries. A potential emerging 

public health issue may be the increasing incidence of childhood obesity in 

developing  countries  and  the  resulting  socioeconomic  and  public  health 

burden faced by these countries in the near future. In a systematic review 

carried out through an electronic search of the literature from 1950-2007, 

the author compared data from surveys on the prevalence of overweight, 

obesity, and  the  metabolic  syndrome  among  children  living  in  developing 

countries.  The  highest  prevalence  of  childhood  overweight  was  found  in 

Eastern Europe and the Middle East,  whereas India and Sri Lanka had  the 

lowest  prevalence.  The  few  studies  conducted  in  developing  countries 

showed a considerably high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among 


702 

 

 



youth.  These  findings  provide  alarming  data  for  health  professionals  and 

policy-makers about the extent of these problems in developing countries, 

many  of  which  are  still  grappling  with  malnutrition  and  micronutrient 

deficiencies.  Time  trends  in  childhood  obesity  and  its  metabolic 

consequences,  defined  by  uniform  criteria,  should  be  monitored  in 

developing  countries  in  order  to  obtain  useful  insights  for  primordial  and 

primary  prevention  of  the  upcoming  chronic  disease  epidemic  in  such 

communities. 

East Mediterr Health J. 2004 Nov;10(6):789-93. 

Overweight  and  Obesity  in  the  Eastern  Mediterranean 

Region: Can We Control It? 

Musaiger AO. 



Abstract 

Obesity  has  become  an  epidemic  problem  worldwide,  and  in  the  Eastern 

Mediterranean  Region  the  status  of  overweight  has  reached  an  alarming 

level.  A  prevalence  of  3%-9%  overweight  and  obesity  has  been  recorded 

among preschool children, while that among schoolchildren was 12%-25%. 

A marked increase in obesity generally has been noted among adolescents, 

ranging  from  15%  to  45%.  In  adulthood,  women  showed  a  higher 

prevalence of obesity (35%-75%) than men (30%-60%). Several factors, such 

as  change  in  dietary  habits,  socioeconomic  factors,  inactivity  and 

multiparity (among women) determine  obesity in this  Region. There is  an 

urgent need for national programmes to prevent and control obesity in the 

countries of the Region. 

 

 


703 

 

 



Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2003;12(3):337-43. 

Nutrition-Related Health Patterns in the Middle East. 

Galal O. 



Abstract 

Nutritionally-related  health  patterns  in  the  Middle  East  have  changed 

significantly  during  the  last  two  decades.  The  main  forces  that  have 

contributed  to  these  changes  are  the  rapid  changes  in  the  demographic 

characteristics of the region, speedy urbanization, and social development 

in  the  absence  of  steady  and  significant  economic  growth.  Within  these 

changes,  the  Middle  East  has  the  highest  dietary  energy  surplus  of  the 

developing  countries.  The  population  in  the  region  has  a  low  poverty 

prevalence,  at  4%.  The  region's  child  malnutri on  rate  is  19%,  sugges ng 

that nutrition insecurity remains a problem due mainly to poor health care 

and  not  due  to  inadequate  dietary  energy  supply  or  poverty.  The  one 

extreme country, Afghanistan, has an extremely high dietary energy deficit 

of  490  kilocalories  and  a  40%  malnutri on  rate.  Iran  and  Egypt  have 

rela vely  high  child  malnutri on  rates  of  39  and  16%  respec vely,  but 

belong  to  the  dietary  energy  surplus  group.  Morocco  and  the  United 

Emirates have the lowest child malnutri on rates of 6 and 8% respec vely. 

In the Middle East, as in other parts of the world, large shifts have occurred 

in  dietary  and  physical  activity  patterns.  These  changes  are  reflected  in 

nutritional  and  health  outcomes.  Rising  obesity  rates  and  high  levels  of 

chronic  and  degenerative  diseases  are  observed.  These  pressing  factors 

that  include  the  nature  and  changes  in  the  food  consumption  pattern, 

globalization  of  food  supply,  and  the  inequity  in  health  care  will  be 

discussed. 

  

J Nutr. 2003 Apr; 133(4):1180-5. 



Lifestyle and Ethnicity Play a Role in All-Cause Mortality. 

Lubin F, Lusky A, Chetrit A, Dankner R. 



Abstract 

The Israeli population is characterized by its marked ethnic diversity. These 

ethnic groups (originating mainly from Yemen/Aden, the Middle East, North 

Africa  and  Europe/America)  have  kept  traditional  distinct  lifestyle  habits 

and exhibit different morbidity and mortality trends. The aim of the present 

study was to evaluate the associations among ethnic background, lifestyle 

pa erns and  18-y  all-cause  mortality.  A  subgroup  of  632  individuals  aged 


704 

 

 



41-70  y,  drawn  from  a  larger  stra fied  cohort  from  the  Israel  Glucose 

Intolerance, Obesity and Hypertension study, were personally interviewed, 

using a quantified food-frequency questionnaire, including most food items 

consumed  by  the  different  subpopulations  in  Israel.  Physical  activity  was 

also  evaluated,  as  well  as  smoking  status.  Weight,  height  and  blood 

pressure  (BP)  measurements  were  taken.  Predictors  of  mortality  were 

assessed  using  Cox  proportional  hazards  models.  Over  the  18-y  follow-up 

period,  151  deaths  occurred  (24%).  In  comparison  with  Yemenites,  the 

adjusted  hazard  ra os  (HR)  for  all  cause  mortality  were  HR  =  1.77  [95% 

confidence  interval  (CI):  1.01-3.09]  for  Europeans/Americans;  HR  =  1.63 

(95% CI: 0.89-2.99) for those from a Middle Eastern background; and HR = 

1.56  (95%  CI:  0.82-2.97)  for  North  Africans.  Mortality  risk  was  43%  lower 

among those consuming > or =25 g of dietary fiber daily [HR = 0.57 (95% CI: 

0.41-0.72)], and 42% lower for those consuming <300 mg/d of cholesterol 

[HR  =  0.58  (95%  CI:  0.34-0.96)].  Accumula ng  an  average  of  0.5  h/d  of 

moderate  physical  ac vity  reduced  mortality  by  47%  [HR  =  0.53  (95%  CI: 

0.29-0.97)].  Smoking  increased  systolic  BP,  older  age  and  male  sex 

increased  mortality  risk.  We  conclude  that  in  our  study,  although  ethnic 

origin  and  lifestyle  habits  are  interrelated,  each  affects  mortality 

independently. 

 

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Mar;54(3):247-52. 



Obesity In Women from Developing Countries. 

Martorell R, Khan LK, Hughes ML, Grummer-Strawn LM. 

Department of International Health, The Rollins School of Public Health of 

Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. 

rmart77@sph.emory.edu

 

Abstract 



OBJECTIVES:  

The key objective was to estimate obesity (>/=30 kg/m2) in 

women

 15-49 y from developing countries. A second objective was to study 



how obesity varies by educational level and by residence in urban and rural 

areas. A third objective was to investigate how national incomes shape the 

relationship  between  obesity  and  eduction  or  residence.DESIGN:    The 

analyses  use  cross-sectional  data  from  nationally  representative  surveys 

from  developing  countries  carried  out  in  the  last  decade.  Most  of  the 

surveys were Demographic Health Surveys (DHS). Data from a survey from 

the USA are used for comparison. Se ng:The 39 surveys used come from 

38 d 


705 

 

 



eveloping countries

 and the USA. 



SUBJECTS:  

A total of 147,938 non-pregnant women 15-49 y were included 

in the analyses



RESULTS:  

The percentage of obese women was 0.1% in South Asia, 2.5% in 

Sub-Saharan  Africa,  9.  6%  in  La n  America  and  the  Caribbean,  15.4%  in 

Central  Eastern  Europe/Commonwealth  of  Independent  States  (CEE/CIS), 

17.2% in the Middle East and North Africa, and 20.7% in the USA. Levels of 

obesity

  in  countries  increased  sharply  until  a  gross  national  product  of 



US$1500  per  capita  (1992  values)  was  reached  and  changed  li le 

thereafter.  In  very  poor  countries,  such  as  in  Sub-Saharan  Africa,  obesity 

levels  were  greatly  concentrated  among  urban  and  higher  educated 

women


.  In  more  developed  countries,  such  as  those  in  Latin  America  and 

the  CEE/CIS  regions,  obesity  levels  were  more  equally  distributed  in  the 

general population.

 

CONCLUSIONS:  

Based on the analyses presented and on a review of the 

literature, it is concluded that obesity among women is a serious problem in 

Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa, and the 

CEE/CIS region. Obesity is less of a concern in Sub-Saharan Africa, China and 

South  Asia.  Obesity  levels  increased  over  time  in  most  of  the  limited 

number of countries with data, but at varying rates. Rising national incomes 

in developing countries and increased 'Westernization' will most likely lead 

to increased levels of obesity in the future.

 

SPONSORSHIP:  

Financial support was provided by the Food and Nutrition 

Program of the Pan American Health Organization and by the World Bank.

 

 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling