Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet48/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   87

BODEGAS COTA 45, RAMIRO IBANEZ, Sanlucar 

UBE won knobe – the flor-ce is with these proto-sherries. 

 

These are still white wines made under flor from numerous old Palomino clones, rediscovering styles of Manzanilla that were 

made in the 18th and early 19th centuries. 

 

Ramiro Ibáñez Espinar, is a restless and talented winemaker who, with experience in Bordeaux and Australia as well as his 

native Sanlúcar, runs a winemakeing consultancy under the name GL Cero used by various bodegas in the Marco de Jerez. 

He is hugely enthusiastic about the potential of albariza soil and the recovery of traditional local grape varieties, many of 

which are all but lost, and which are no longer permitted in the Consejo regulations. He makes all sorts of interesting wines to 

demonstrate the terroir and personality of each vineyard and grape variety without letting too much flor obscure it. Ramiro 

was a founder member of Manifiesto 119, a group of like-minded local wine producers who want to experiment with the old 

varieties and winemaking techniques, make unfortified sherry and give more importance to the grapes and the vineyard, not to 

mention restoring casas de viña. They chose this name after the 119 grape varieties (40 of them in Cádiz) catalogued in 

Andalucía in 1807 by the first Spanish ampelographer, Simón de Rojas Clemente. Like Ramiro the group makes table wines as 

well as Sherry, and while few of them carry the DO they are still sought after and hard to obtain due to the small quantities 

made. One of the projects is called Ube and focuses on old vine Palomino from different clones fermented in an old 

Manzanilla butt without flor. 

 

UBE Miraflores uses old clones of Palomino and is mix of three different albarizas (chalky soil with high fossil content): 

lentejuelas (grainy); tosca cerrada (lower chalk content, harder) and lustrillo (chalky with iron) 

The grapes derive from five different vineyards of the Pago Miraflores area in Sanlúcar – the largest and most heterogeneous 

vineyard area of Sanlúcar. This blend of different albariza soils and vineyard gives the equivalent of a “village” Sanlúcar 

wine. 

 

Carrascal is from the Las Vegas vineyard, the highest in the Pago de Carrasacal, and the closest area to the Atlantic. The 

vines are original rootstock Palomino and the terroir is lentejuelas, a grainy type of Albariza soil. The wine is fermented in 

500 litre sherry butts with indigenous yeasts, aged in very old barrels and bottled after a light filtration and minimal sulphites 

added. 

 

What is also delightful is the uplift of beautiful chalky acidity and the wines weigh in at an eminently drinkable 12-12.5% abv. 

Los Angeles (thirst)slakers! 

 

 

2016 


COTA 45 UBE MIRAFLORES 

 



2015 

COTA 45 UBE CARRASCAL 

 

2016 



COTA 45 MIRAFLORES - magnum 

 



 

 


 

 - 220 - 

 

 

BODEGA TAJINASTE, GARCIA FARRAIS, Tenerife 

Tajinaste is a small family-owned winery located in the Valle de la Orotava. It is on the north side of Tenerife and therefore 

heavily influenced by the vientos alisios, or trade winds, which help moderate the climate of the islands. Agustín García and 

his family farm a total of six hectares (15 acres). Tajinaste’s vineyards are situated between 300 and 500 meters above sea 

level. The oldest stocks of the varieties Listán Negro and Listán Blanco were planted around 1914

 (100% listan negra): Vivid 

ruby-red. Spicy redcurrant and cherry scents are complicated by dried rose and blood orange. Juicy and penetrating, offering 

lively red fruit flavors and a hint of black pepper. Finishes brisk and appealingly sweet, with gentle tannins and lingering red 

fruit notes.

 

 

 

2016  LISTAN BLANCO 

 

2015  TRADICION LISTAN NEGRO 



 

 



Ode to Wine 

 

Day-coloured wine, 



night-coloured wine, 

wine with purple feet 

or wine with topaz blood, 

wine, 


starry child 

of earth, 

wine, smooth 

as a golden sword, 

soft 

as lascivious velvet, 



wine, spiral-seashelled 

and full of wonder

amorous, 

marine; 


never has one goblet contained you, 

one song, one man, 

you are choral, gregarious, 

at the least, you must be shared. 

At times 

you feed on mortal 

memories; 

your wave carries us 

from tomb to tomb, 

stonecutter of icy sepulchres, 

and we weep 

transitory tears; 

your 

glorious 



spring dress 

is different, 

blood rises through the shoots

wind incites the day, 

nothing is left 

of your immutable soul. 

Wine 

stirs the spring, happiness 



bursts through the earth like a plant, 

walls crumble, 

and rocky cliffs, 

chasms close, 

as song is born. 


 

 - 221 - 

 

 

 



A jug of wine, and thou beside me 

in the wilderness. 

sang the ancient poet. 

Let the wine pitcher 

add to the kiss of love its own. 

 

My darling, suddenly 



the line of your hip 

becomes the brimming curve 

of the wine goblet, 

your breast is the grape cluster, 

your nipples are the grapes, 

the gleam of spirits lights your hair, 

and your navel is a chaste seal 

stamped on the vessel of your belly, 

your love an inexhaustible 

cascade of wine, 

light that illuminates my senses, 

the earthly splendour of life. 

 

But you are more than love



the fiery kiss, 

the heat of fire, 

more than the wine of life; 

you are 


the community of man, 

translucency, 

chorus of discipline, 

abundance of flowers. 

I like on the table, 

when we’re speaking, 

the light of a bottle 

of intelligent wine. 

Drink it, 

and remember in every 

drop of gold, 

in every topaz glass, 

in every purple ladle, 

that autumn laboured 

to fill the vessel with wine; 

and in the ritual of his office, 

let the simple man remember 

to think of the soil and of his duty, 

to propagate the canticle of the wine.  

 

Pablo Neruda



 

 

 



 

 - 222 - 

 

PORTUGAL 

 

 



 

VALE DA CAPUCHA, PEDRO MARQUES, Lisboa – Organic 

Pedro Marques’ Vale da Capucha wines are from organically farmed vines situated in the Lisbon region around eight km 

from the Atlantic Ocean in limestone soils rich with fossils. The precept is simple: maximum human work in the vineyard and 

minimum intervention in the winery. The resulting terroir-driven wines come from a medley of Portuguese varieties: Arinto; 

Fernão Pires; Alvarinho: Antão Vaz; Gouveio; Viosinho; Touriga Nacional and Tinta Roriz. 

 

The 2012 Alvarinho is hand harvested with low yields. The grapes are whole bunch pressed. The juice ferments with the skins 

and on the lees for three weeks before being racked off and spending a further 20 months on the fine lees and the wine is then 

bottled without filtration or fining and with a wee bit of SO2. 

 

The Gouveio (Portugal’s version of Godello) is an addition to our portfolio. This white has a brilliant line of acidity allied to 

some pretty crunchy seashell minerality. 

 

Arinto is a versatile grape, grown in most of Portugal’s wine regions. In Vinho Verde country, it goes by the name of 

Pedernã. It makes vibrant wines with lively, refreshing acidity, often with a mineral quality, along with gentle 

flavours reminiscent of apple, lime and lemon. Pedro’s version tickles the tongue with maximum prejudice.

 

 

Pedro subscribes to the less-is-more approach. And also leaving the wines to come into focus in their own good time.

 

 

2015 


VALE DA CAPUCHA VINHO BRANCO 

 



2015 

VALE DA CAPUCHA ALVARINHO 

 

2015 



VALE DA CAPUCHA GOUVEIO 

 



2013/15 

VALE DA CAPUCHA ARINTO 

 

2016 



VALE DA CAPUCHA CASTELAO 

 



 

 

CASA DE CELLO, Entre-Douro e Minho and Dão 



For most of the 20

th

 Century, the Dão region in northern Portugal never quite lived up to its potential. Due to government 

regulation, private firms were forced to buy finished wine from ten co-operatives scattered throughout the region. This 

system was finally changed in 1989 with Portugal’s entry into the EU. Since then, a winemaking revolution has occurred in 

Dão and throughout Portugal, as young winemakers and new property owners have been bringing top winemaking 

techniques to the native Portuguese varieties. Owner João Pedro Araujo of Casa de Cello has teamed up with Pedro 

Anselmo, star winemaker of Quinta do Ameal and others, to make Quinta da Vegia. Located in the Dão region near Penalva 

de Castelo, Quinta da Vegia has 20 ha of vineyard planted to Touriga Nacional, Aragonês (the local clone of Tempranillo) 

and Trincadeira Preta. Porta Fronha is their 222rborio cuvée, bursting with crunchy red berry fruit, plus food-friendly 

earthy and spicy notes. Deep, bright red. Spicy, almost saline aromas of fresh red berries, plums and cherry skin. Lively and 

sweet, the red fruit qualities showing striking purity and focus. Really delicious wine with impressive lift and energy to the 

finish, which leaves a strong impression of pure, fresh strawberry and raspberry fruit. Already drinking well. – Tanzer The 

Vinho Verde, in the words of two famous adverts, does what it says on the label whilst staying sharp to the bottom of the 

glass. A blend of Avesso and Loureira it conveys the customary pear and apple fruit aromas, with a touch of floral and 

green notes. Lovely succulent fruit on the palate, with lots of lemon and dry, appley qualities and very dry, pithy lemon 

finish. 

 

2015 


VINHO VERDE BRANCO QUINTA DE SANJOANNE 

 



2012 

DAO TINTO QUINTA DA VEGIA PORTA FRONHA 

 


 

 - 223 - 

 

 

APHROS, VASCO CROFT, Vinho Verde – Biodynamic 

With exceptional conditions of soil and solar exposition, the vineyards lie on softly inclined hills looking over the Lima 

River. More than 20 hectares of an ecologically sound territory, rich in bio-diversity, in which we find, besides the 

vines, forests with species of acacia, oak, beech, pine and eucalyptus, chestnuts orchards and a park of century old 

monumental trees.

 

The vines of Casal do Paço are situated in a south facing amphitheatre, on gentle slopes, 1km north 



of the Lima river. Sheltered by hills and forests from the north and west winds, they receive welcome breezes from the 

south bringing the Atlantic influence that characterizes the freshness of the wines. 

We begin with a Loureiro which displays a variety of pleasant citrus fruits on the palate such as lemon and tangerine. 

Fruits, flowers and minerality are the key notes within a delicate balance between sweetness and acidity. 



Vinho Verde is the product of its micro-climate; the result of the richness and purity of the land which is the legacy of 

centuries of agriculture; a sandy, granitic soil that endows the wines with a special acidity and minerality: these are the main 

features of the terroir. A classic Teinturier grape (see Alicante Bouschet and Saperavi) Vinhão is one of the oddities in which 

the juice from the flesh is crimson not clear. The red grapes, after being destalked go directly into fermentation vats or the 

“lagares” together with their skins, where they go through a process of maceration in order to maximize the extraction of 

colour and polyphenolic elements.  

Dark as the inside of a coal mine at midnight the Aphros Vinho Verde has impenetrable opacity, presents a slightly prickly 

sensation in the mouth and then bursts out smilingly with thick gobs of bramble jam and exotic black cherries and black 

raspberries. The tannins are chewy, agreeably abrasive, and, twinned with the angular acidity, create a pucker-sour-sizzle 

combination which confronts the palate with plenty of difficult textural adjustments. You can almost smell the colour of this 

distilled purple juice; it’s as if the skins had been freshly ripped off the flesh and just finished fermenting in the glass. The 

texture is part stalky and part bitter chocolate but it is the kinetic acidity that simultaneously drives the tannins over the gums 

and helps to alleviate their astringency. This is a prime example where cultural context might provide the narrative necessary 

to appreciate the spirit of the wine. Served chilled with some slow cooked shoulder of pork or one of those artery-coating 

Asturian bean stews this wine’s snappy vitality would not only cut through, but dissolve, fat. I can think of few better drinks to 

be supped al fresco, preferably in a carafe, where the thrilling, almost unreal intensity of the colour and the joyfully rasping 

rusticity would seem to laugh in the face of wine convention.  

The Palhete harks back to a traditional Portuguese style, a co-ferment of white and red grapes. Its colour and texture remind 

one of Jura grapes, with the sour flavours provided by the Vinhão—despite it being only 20 percent of the blend.  

 

Vasco write: “It is hard to credit what a natural and effortless endeavour it was to make this conversion. The amphorae 

(which are very difficult to find) that found their way to me were from Alentejo, all six from the same supplier, lined with 

beeswax by a marvellous potter (who is also a healer and is conversant with plant medicine). In the cellar, all I had to do was 

to remove a lot of electric cables, build a 20 cm step for the amphorae, and change the lighting. As for equipment I bought a 

perfectly functioning manual pump for 180,00 euros, had a manual de-stemmer made by a carpenter, and recycled a crusher 

and a press from my great grandmother’s time.  

 

We’re making two different wines: a 100% Loureiro, which is now fermenting in three amphorae, each with a different 

proportion of stems/whole grapes/must; and a « Palhete », a blend of 80% Loureiro and 20% Vinhão.  

 

The Palhete is in line with the tradition of ancient Portuguese wines. Most red wines in Iberia were in fact blends of white and 

red grapes before the XVIII century. That is why they were called « Tinto », meaning « tinted”. In medieval times the symbolic 

image that monks had in mind, when making red wine, was the blood of Christ. A wine that to contain light and transparency 

within itself. In Alentejo, the Portuguese region where the amphora tradition has been established for 2000 years, white wines 

(from amphora) are the most typical and appreciated

.”

 

 

2016 


APHROS LOUREIRO VINHO VERDE BRANCO 

 



2015 

APHROS FAUNUS LOUREIRO AMPHORA 

 

2016 



AFROS VINHAO VINHO VERDE TINTO 

 



2015 

APHROS FAUNUS PALHETE AMPHORA 

Ro 

 

 



 

 

 - 224 - 

 

ITALY –– STATE OF THE MANY NATIONS REPORT 

 

During the last few years we have enjoyed several sensuous epiphanies in Italy. Imagine wallowing in a heated spa swimming pool 

toasting a snow-capped Mont Blanc with a glass of sparkling Blanc de Morgex, or tasting 1961 Barolo in the Borgogno winery, or eating 

almonds under the pergola vines in Sankt Magdalener… 

 

Much hithering and thithering has allowed us to probe the hidden corners of this amazing country. Friuli, abutting Slovenia, has provided 



perhaps the most varied and recondite taste sensations: the biodynamic wines of Benjamin Zidarich, for example, (consider salty-mineral 

Vitovska and sapid, cherry-bright Terrano), the more constructed amber efforts of Princic nodding and winking to Gravner, a spicy 



ramato (copper-hued) Pinot Grigio from Bellanotte, and a dry Verduzzo and Schioppettino respectively from Bressan – to name but a 

few. In Piedmont we are working successfully with Giacomo Borgogno, one of the oldest estates in Barolo. The wines are organic and 

delicious, drinkable now and endlessly ageworthy. Another estate that prides itself on using no chemicals is Sottimano in Barbaresco. The 

2004 Fausoni is destined to be a memorable vintage, its supreme elegance making up for the natural austerity of the wine. After a long 

hunt we finally discovered two superb Brunellos: Pian dell’ Orino and Il Paradiso di Manfredi. Uncompromising pure wines at the 

former; no kowtowing to the palates of certain American wine critics at this establishment whilst the authentic Brunellos from Manfredi 

magically capture the essential purity of the Sangiovese grape. 

 

When you’re choosing Italian wine you don’t have to sacrifice yourself on the altar of orthodoxy. PG has for too long stood not for 



Parental Guidance but for vapid Pinot Grigio or Pappy Gruel. Ditch the dishwater! How does unfiltered Prosecco, made in the ancestral 

fashion from pre-phylloxera vines, sound instead? Or Sicilian Cerasuolo – fermented in amphorae? Or perhaps you have an irrational 

hankering for a Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi from 1991? Or a dry Lacrima di Morro d’Alba? And wouldn’t you like to open a bottle of 

Vecchio Samperi (a dry, unfortified traditional-style Marsala) from Marco de Bartoli and know that it would be still in perfect condition 

in several week’s time? From the communes of Valle d’Aosta, nestling on the Swiss border, to the baking volcanic plug of Pantelleria 

swept by hot winds off the Sahara, every corner of Italy throws up a grape variety, a quirky tradition or some delicious vinous oddity that 

keeps the most jaded palate on taste-bud tenterhooks. 

 

In The Vineyard – The Biodynamic Clock 



 

We don’t set out deliberately to buy wines that are organic and biodynamic – these labels are practically irrelevant as many wine growers 

adapt elements of natural philosophy or vineyard practice in order to make better wines from healthier vines, but, it so happens that about 

half of our Italian wineries are working to a consistent and rigorous programme of sustainable viticulture and minimal intervention. The 

link between organic/biodynamic farming and terroir (or typicity) is surely undeniable, and, if it cannot be proven by lab technicians in 

the sterile conditions of a laboratory, it can certainly be tasted time and again in the wines. Of course, good winemaking exalts the 

expression of terroir, but it doesn’t have to be overtly interventionist. This year, at our “Real Wine Tasting” we brought together growers 

from various regions of Italy – the link being that they all worked without chemicals in the vineyard (encouraging biodiversity) and 

without adjustments in the winery. With no make up and no pretension the wines simply tasted of themselves; the strong, distinctive 

flavours announced proudly that the wines could only come where they came from, a bonus and a relief in the face of global pressure to 

create styles to please the “common denominator palate (whatever that might be). Thank goodness for diversity; vive la difference, as 

they don’t say in Rome. 

 

 

 

 



 

 - 225 - 

 

Enotria Tellus

 

 



For whereso’er I turn my ravished eyes/ Gay gilded scenes and shining prospects rise; /Poetic fields encompass me around/And still I 

seem to tread on classic ground.  

Joseph Addison – Letter From Italy 

 

In the last couple of years we have assembled an agency portfolio of “Italian terroiristes”, a group of growers dedicated to producing wines 



of purity, typicity and individuality, who are not only perfectionists and passionate about their own wines but also fine ambassadors for 

their respective regions. Our idea was to represent growers from both Italy’s classic and lesser-seen regions. From the Alpine valleys of 

Valle d’Aosta to its baking southern Mediterranean coast Italy is many countries with a fascinating diversity of cultures, climates and wine 

styles. It is our intention to demonstrate the Italian wines can match the French for regional diversity and sensitivity to terroir. We have 

examples of rare traditional indigenous varieties such as Longanesi, Albana, Monica, Mayolet and Petit Rouge and also the best expression 

of better-known grapes such as Sangiovese, Nebbiolo and Montepulciano. 

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling