Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet45/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   87

SPAIN   

 

Continued…



 

 

 



 

BODEGAS PITTACUM, ALFREDO MARQUES CALVA, Bierzo  

Bodegas Pittacum was purchased several years ago by Terras Gauda who were looking to find a red wine with distinctive 

personality. The winery is located in Arganza, a town of longstanding vine-growing and wine-making heritage, nestled in the 

beautifully hilly landscape of the Bierzo region. 

The Bierzo Tinto, made with the Mencia grape, is sourced from 50-90 year-old vineyards, located on poor slate soils so as 

carefully to force the process of ripening. Organic fertilisers are used and green practices are employed throughout the 

vineyard to ensure the health of the vines. Once the timing of the picking of the different plots has been decided, the teams of 

grape-pickers make the first selection on the vine. Only the healthiest, ripest bunches are packed into 14-kilogram boxes, to 

prevent them from splitting or becoming bruised. 

They are then sent straight to the winery, where they arrive in perfect condition, ready to be processed. 

The delivery area outside the winery is where the boxes are received on pallets and unloaded one by one onto the selection 

bench, where any below-standard bunches that happen to have slipped through are promptly removed. The selective 

extraction of tannins is carried out with manual cap-plunging, pumping-over and long macerations. Every day during the 

barrelling the wines are tasted, and with the aid of analytical monitoring of polyphenol compounds, the appropriate time for 

removal is determined. 

Next, the grape skins are pressed in a vertical press working at low pressure-important if the wine is to be of optimal quality. 

Now is the time for malolactic fermentation, part of which is done in stainless-steel vats and the rest in oak casks. 

 

After malolactic fermentation – and still without having undergone any kind of filtering or clarifying – the wine is moved to 

the aging casks.  

Different oak sources and different vat curing levels to obtain the best results for each type of wine.  

The casks are located in a stone farmhouse, sheltered from sunlight and at ideal temperature and humidity level, for as long 

as necessary to reveal the potential of each harvest and characteristics of each type of wine.  

After aging, the wine is clarified with egg white and then coarsely filtered, bottled and stored. 

 

The wine is intense cherry-red colour with a striking purplish rim, very clean and brilliant. It is marked by a complex 

bouquet, with a wide range of aromas including red fruits (blackberry, raspberry), liquorice and mineral tones, 

pleasant woody hints, spices – pepper and oregano – and an agreeable backdrop redolent of smoked cocoa. Warm in 

the mouth, with a significant concentration of fruit, dense and fleshy and sweet tannin it is a tasty wine to be 

savoured, with a persistent finish and retro-nasal qualities, plus pleasant balsamic resonance. 

 

The wines are sensitive and true to the vintage. 2002 is a wine of bright fruit and delicious acidity, whereas 2003 has 

richer colour, sweeter fruit and more tannin. 2004 is stylistically between the two. Each wine, however, demonstrates 

the individuality and expressiveness of the Mencia grape. 

 

The Aurea is from a single 1-hectare vineyard called Areixola located on an east-facing hillside slope with a 

particular microclimate favouring the production of aromatic Mencias. After a fifteen-day maceration period the 

grapes receive a smooth pressing. A further malolactic fermentation in new French barrels is followed by three 

months batonnage and ageing in new oak for 14 months. The wine is clarified with egg whites, but left unfiltered. The 

Aurea has intense, expressive aromas: not only mature notes of roasted fruits (black cherries, sweet figs), toffee and 

cocoa, but also herbal notes such as rosemary and lemongrass. Dense in the mouth, but exceedingly elegant with 

smooth tannins, great balance and roundness. A very long finish and a complex aftertaste, very fruity with 

harmonious roasted and toasted flavours again apparent. For such a rich wine this is amazingly delicious. 

 

Petit Pitacum is a robust yet refreshing Mencia rosé oozing cherries and red plums as well as subtle notes of liquorice and 

red pepper. This all-purpose wine would happily network fish soup, stuffed peppers, tuna, and lomo. 

 

Alfredo Marques Calva, the technical director of Pittacum, is both artist and artisan, constantly researching and 

experimenting in the winery. He is equally passionate about food, and a visit to his winery might include a lunch of 

tuna belly with superb pimentos, air-dried beef or slow cooked roast kid washed down with plenty of Pittacum. 

 

 

 

2015 

PETIT PITTACUM 



 

2014 



VAL DE LA LOBA TINTO 

 



2010 

BIERZO TINTO 

 

2010 



BIERZO “AUREA” 

 



2016 

PETIT PITTACUM ROSE 

Ro 

 

 



 

 

 - 203 - 

 

 

 



 

SPAIN   

 

Continued…



 

 

 



BODEGAS TERRAS GAUDA, Rías Baixas 

Albariño wine is considered to be the Spanish “gold” of white wines for its colour and quality. But there’s also another 

theory that connects the wine to the metal – sounds daft but we’ll give it a whirl. The Romans originally colonized Galicia 

for its great mineral wealth, gold in particular; the system that they used for extracting the minerals was the “Terra 

Montium”, which consisted of excavating tunnels, then lighting a fire in them so that they would collapse, and with this 

system they literally managed to destroy mountains. But to excavate these tunnels they needed to soften the rock and to do 

so they used none other than vinegar! The origins and applications of Albariño were industrial then; centuries later the 

vine resurfaces and delicious wines are made. As they say locally: “Although they took all the gold at least they left behind 

Albariño wine.” 

 

Galicia is the land of percebes (barnacles) and wild horses; here they celebrate the famous “curros” (horse corrals). They 

round up all the wild horses to brand them and cut their manes; in Galician it is called “a rapa das bestas”. There is also 

a strong Celtic tradition of folk song and bagpipes. 

 

  

The Galician vineyards of Rías Baixas are dominated by the influence of the Atlantic. This is a green, cloudy, damp 



region of pine, chestnut and oak clad hills with a coastline punctuated by rias (coastal inlets). The region has actually 

produced wines for many centuries, and by the middle of the 19

th

 century, Galicia boasted 55,000 hectares of vines, 

although phylloxera and other diseases greatly reduced this amount. The wine scene remained moribund until the 1980s 

when Albariño, the region’s great white grape was “rediscovered” and found to yield excellent quality wines. Allied to this 

was investment in the technology of cold fermentation and stainless steel that exalted the flavours and aromas of the grape. 

Rías Baixas – low rivers – is named after the abovementioned fjord-like inlets. It has a markedly Atlantic climate with mild 

winters, coolish summers, high humidity and elevated rainfall. The wines of Terras Gauda are located in the subzone of O 

Rosal on the terraces that rise steeply above the river Miño which divides Spain from Portugal. The Abadia de San Campio 

(100% Albariño) is very attractive with citrus, grapefruit, pineapple and mandarin flavours. The O Rosal, a selective blend 

of the best Albariño grapes in the O Rosal subzone is mixed with the indigenous Loureira and Caiño Blanco (harvested in 

October), is greenish-yellow, evoking white flowers and green plums on the nose and filling out on the palate with fresh 

grape and apple compote flavours as well as peach kernel. Edged with superb acidity and a bristling minerality this 

reminds one of a really good Riesling. Both the wines have delicacy and persistence in equal measure. When in this corner 

of Spain drink with the harvest of the Atlantic and indulge in a Galician mariscada (seafood feast). Starting with pulpo a 

feira (Octopus fair-style), second course mussels, chocos (cuttlefish), clams, prawns, scallops, crabs and, of course, 

lobsters. 

 

Terras Gauda is notable for owning around 85% of its own vineyards; the remainder of the grapes are provided under 

strict quality control agreements with local growers. Having this control allows the estate to pick later and more 

selectively (and over a greater period of time) than most others ensuring greater maturity and higher sugar levels in the 

grapes. The sheltered aspect of the vineyards surrounded by forest, the proximity to the Mino and to the sea, also promotes 

ripening. The result is that Terras Gauda is one of the few wineries that do not need to do a malolactic on any of their 

wines, which is why they taste so exceptionally fresh and bright. 

 

What also distinguishes the Terras Gauda – as the estate wine is known – is the presence of the indigenous Caiño variety. 

Although approximately only 15% of the blend, this grape, which is virtually exclusive to Terras Gauda, gives a rich 

quality to the overall wine. The Caiño vineyards tend to be planted on steep slopes with lots of broken slates; the grape 

ripens late, but still has acidity and a strong mineral component. The effect is to lift the aromatic citrus nature of the 

Albariño, giving the wine an irresistible zesty length. 

 

And so to La Mar the latest project from Bodegas Terras Gauda, a blend of Caiño Blanco (85%) and Albarino (15%). 

A word from our sponsors about Caiño. 

It is a native variety from the O Rosal sub-zone, now virtually extinct. Terras Gauda produces 90% of the Caiño throughout 

the region. A low yielding grape, the least productive of Galician white grape varieties, with small clusters and grapes Caiño 

provides very good structure and body resulting in wine with definition and depth. Naturally high acidity provides freshness 

and ensures perfect ageing. The grapes were harvested in the first week of October with excellent ripeness levels, good malic 

and tartaric acidity and a wide aromatic profile. After fermentation the wine remained on lees in tank for three months with 

batonnage. After a further period of ageing the wine was bottled in July 2010. 

La Mar has initial aromas of sweet hay and ripe tropical fruit (mango and fresh pineapple) as well as fine balsamics with 

particular accents of pine resin and finishing on notes of ripe peach and stonefruit. Great complexity with crunchy nectarine 

flavours seasoned with ginger and pepper, marked mineral tones, the whole ensemble soothed by slick acidity. The wine has 

plenty of extract followed by Caino’s classic acid touch, ending on a saline note and the overall impression is of creamy-

textured and rounded wine with lovely spice and the aforementioned balsamic flavours. There is definitely some ageing 

potential here. 

 

2016 



ALBARINO, ABADIA DE SAN CAMPIO 

 



2016 

ALBARINO, ABADIA DE SAN CAMPIO – ½ bottle 

 

2016 



TERRAS GAUDA “O ROSAL” 

 



2015 

“LA MAR” 

 


 

 - 204 - 



SPAIN 

Continued… 

 

 

 



 

Why is Albariño such a firm favourite in London restaurants? Firstly, it is one of the few white wines from Spain with a strong identity. 

There is a common feeling that Spain should produce great wine; certainly, it produces a prodigious volume of wine, but the number of 

excellent drinkable whites is relatively insignificant. Albariño is one of the exceptions. Other than Galicia and northern Portugal, Albariño 

is hardly grown anywhere else in the world (there are a handful of examples coming out of California). Secondly, there is the romance of 

the region from which it originates. Centuries ago Galicia was believed to be the edge of the earth or civilisation, the place where land 

ended and an endless sea began. The name Finisterre is testament to this elemental frontier mentality. Galicia’s spiritual capital is 

Santiago de Compostela. Here lies the body of St. James the Apostle. Millions of Christians make the pilgrimage each year, visiting the 

silver casket entombed beneath the altar of the grand cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. Many come to atone for their sins, walking 

hundreds of miles over well-worn paths first navigated in the ninth century, when the apostle’s remains were discovered. Others seek the 

miracle of healing, some climbing the granite steps at the entrance to the cathedral on their hands and knees.  

 

Perhaps one minor miracle is how viticulture thrives in such a region. The wet maritime climate seldom allows the grapes to fully ripen 



and one would imagine that the wine should normally either taste tart and thin or funky and mouldy, the result of moisture in the 

vineyards. Modern trellising systems and canopy management techniques have certainly helped to combat rot; meanwhile the best estates 

harvest manually and also do a triage on a selection bench. Albariño’s flavours tease and please on multiple levels. Citric notes are 

plentiful; the Albariño disports ripe grapefruit, lime and kiwi; the wine also has good sugar levels balanced by wonderfully natural acids 

and crystalline minerality. Despite its high acidity, Albariño is not a wine that ages well. Although it is often compared to German 

Riesling, Albariño is meant to be drunk young because it has a tendency to oxidize quickly.  

 

“I will be with you in the squeezing of a lemon” 

 

The perfect accompaniment to a whole range of fish and shellfish from mussels, clams and oysters to sardines, mackerel, skate and hake, 



Albariño is the product of its environment, a true wine of the sea. It is a reminder of where water, sky and land meet; it quenches the 

thirst, lifts the spirits and can transport you to a wild, beautiful landscape. 

 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 205 - 

 

 

BODEGA MENGOBA, GREGORY PEREZ, Bierzo – Organic 



Bodega Mengoba’s vineyards span over Espanillo, Valtuille, Villafranca de El Bierzo and Carracedo on the slate, calcareous 

and stony soils of these areas. Two varieties of grape are cultivated to make their white wine, Doña Blanca and Godello. The 

Mencía vines are located in Espanillo at about 2500 ft above sea level. The vines are between 25 and 80 years old. 

Winemaker Gregory Pérez takes great pride in the bodega’s artisanal vineyard work; the vines are grown organically and 

ploughed by cows. Green pruning and integrated pest management are utilized, and they only intervene in the vineyard when 

absolutely necessary. The Bierzo Blanco (Godello and Dona Blanca) comes from different vineyards with diverse soil types 

ranging from calcareous-clay, stony and slate. After a manual harvest in small boxes and goes through a pneumatic press. 

The juice is fermented at low temperature, the fine lees selected for five month batonnage. The plots of Mencia are located in 

Horta and Vallafranca del Bierzo at 550 metres of altitude on clay soils with sand. The grapes are destemmed and crushed 

with a traditional vinification with pumping over during the fermentation which takes place in stainless steel.

 

Incredibly 



purple and fruity it has flavours of sweet black cherries and damson, a dash of Mencia herbs (oregano and pepper) and a 

lovely fresh finish. Amazing value and perfect wine by the glass

.

 



 

The Folie Douce is a terrific sweet wine from Petit Manseng, Godello and Dona Blanca on slate and clay spoils. Harvest was 

made on December 15

th

, the grapes raisined and then frozen, The juice is fermented in 225 litre barrels and remains on the 

lees for a further seventeen months. The final wine has 157 grams of residual sugar. 

 

2015 


BIERZO BREZO BLANCO 

 



2015 

BIERZO BREZO TINTO 

 

2015 



FLOR DE BREZO 

 



 

 

 



ADEGA SAMEIRAS, Ríbeiro – Organic  

Surrounded by mountainous terrain and sheltered from the oceanic influence, the cultivation of the vine is the dominant 

feature of the landscape of Ribeiro, occupying almost all the slopes. The DO is located in southern Galicia, in the north-

western edge of the province of Ourense, in the confluence of the valleys formed by the rivers Miño, Avia, and Barbantiño 

Arnoia. The vineyards range from 75 to 400 metres above sea level in the valleys and on the hillsides, sometimes on steeply-

terraced slopes. At Sameirás they uphold the utmost respect for the environment, maintaining the integrity of soil and 

microbial activity by using only strictly necessary treatments and preventing erosion by the application of organic matter. Due 

to the variety of soils Adega Sameirás work with six grapes, matching each variety to its preferred terroir. 

They also work traditionally, for example, tying the branches with wicker, raffia and reed materials, which, once they cease to 

be useful, are ploughed back into the soil for organic matter. During the harvest Adega Sameirás only pick the ripest bunches, 

doing a severe triage on the vine. The wine is then fermented in stainless steel tanks at a controlled temperature. Produced 

from an intriguing blend of

 

55% Treixadura, 20% Albariño, 12% Godello, 8% Lado, 2% Loureira, 2% Torrontes and 1% 

Caíño Blanco, this medium gold-coloured tank-aged wine offers a complex nose of minerals, honey, melon and citrus. 

Medium-bodied, it has a smooth texture, excellent underlying acidity, and a pure, long finish. It’s a fruity little numero. The 

Tinto is every bit as interesting as the white, with the sort of crunchy minerality that tastes as if it is carved out of the very 

stone itself. A blend of local heroes – Sousón 30%, Caíño Tinto 30%, Brancellao 20% & Mencía 20%  

it is a dark ruby-coloured sporting a multifaceted perfume of earth notes, Asian spices, lavender, menthol, mint, black cherry, 

and black raspberry. Elegantly styled, on the palate it has outstanding volume, grip, and length that appeals to both the 

intellect and the senses. 

 

2014 



SAMEIRAS BLANCO 

 



2013 

SAMEIRAS BLANCO 1040 COLHEITA 

 

2014 



SAMEIRAS BLANCO – magnum 

 



2014 

SAMEIRAS TINTO 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 206 - 



SPAIN 

Continued… 

 

 

ADEGA CACHIN, CESAR ENRIQUE DIEGUEZ, Ríbeira Sacra 



Beginning in the early 1990s, the DO Ribeira Sacra began to take form and the Enríquez family started the process of 

reclaiming their historic site, Peza do Rei. Peza is Galician dialect for Pieza or Trozo, meaning “parcel”. This wine is named 

after a famed 5 ha parcel of prime vineyard which was considered one of the best vineyards in the time of Castilian kings 

(“Rei” is Galician for Rey meaning King)

 

The D.O. of Ribeira Sacra (or “sacred hillside”) is the most visually stunning of all Galicia’s four D.O.s. in North-West 



Spain. It is home to some of the most spectacular vineyards anywhere in the world, with slopes approaching 60% incline. 

 

Ribeira Sacra is divided into five sub-zones following the rivers Miño and Sil (a tributary of the Miño) towards the city of 

Ourense: This one is Ribeiras do Sil with some of the steepest vineyards of the region spilling down to the river Sil. The 

Romans entered Ribeira Sacra as early as 24 A.D. to extract gold from the river valleys. This required prodigious engineering 

feats such as the diversion of the Sil River—accomplished with slave labour by digging a 1,300-foot tunnel through what is 

now called Montefurado (“perforated mountain”). The Romans also used slave labour to plant terraced vineyards along the 

Sil and Minho riverbanks. Today, Ribeira Sacra growers still have to work like slaves to prune, tend, and harvest grapes from 

these improbably situated vines. A few sites, including Cividade, Marcelino, and Viña A Ferreira, are so inaccessible that 

when the grapes are harvested, they are lowered to boats waiting on the Sil River, brought to landings that can be reached by 

road, and finally hauled to the wineries. All the vineyards have makeshift rails adapted from mining, with mechanical lifts that 

are winched up and down, carrying one person at a time, a few tools, and, during harvest, containers of grapes. Ribeira Sacra 

is where the men (and women) are truly vital, because the cosecheros (those who tend and harvest the vineyards) must also be 

capable of what is known as heroic viticulture. It is one of only two areas in Spain (Catalunya’s Priorat is the other) that 

requires this “heroic viticulture”. The region’s steeply tiered slate bancales, or terraces, have a great deal to do with why the 

wines of Ribeira Sacra can be so profoundly terroir-driven, intriguing, and delicious, and why this area has the potential to 

produce wines as great as those from anywhere in Spain. Eight acres of vertiginous, single-row slate terraces form a perfect 

south-facing amphitheatre on the Edo River tributary of the Sil. The wine is a blend of indigenous melange of Mencia

Brancellao, Merenzao, and Caiño tinto. Light bodied, sappy, mineral red, crunchy red fruits (redcurrant/cranberry) with 

refreshing acidity. Unoaked. This wine carries all the aromatic lift of the vineyards whence it comes. 

 

2014 



PEZO DO REI TINTO 



 



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling