Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet14/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   62

97 | 

P a g e


 

 

territory,  seizing power from the weak emperor. Within decades of Aurangzeb's death, 



the Mughal Emperor had little power beyond the walls of Delhi.  

 

 

Full title 

His  full  imperial  title  was:  Al-Sultan  al-Azam  wal  Khaqan  al-Mukarram  Hazrat 

Abul Muzaffar Muhy-ud-Din Muhammad Aurangzeb Bahadur Alamgir I, Badshah Ghazi, 

Shahanshah-e-Sultanat-ul-Hindiya Wal Mughaliya.  

 

Durrani Empire 

Reign of Ahmad Shah Durrani (1747



1772)  

 



Battle of Manupur (1748) 

 



Battle of Lahore (1752) 

 



Battle of Sabzavar (1755) 

 



Durrani occupation of Delhi (1757) 

 



Battle of Gohalwar (1757) 

 



Battle of Lahore (1759) 

 



Battle of Barari Ghat (1760) 

 



Second Battle of Sikandarabad (1760) 

 



Siege of Kunjpura (1760) 

 



Third Battle of Panipat 

 



Battle of Gujranwala (1761) 

 



Battle of Sialkot (1761) 

 



Battle of Kup (1762) 

 



Battle of Sialkot (1763) 

 

In  1709  Mir  Wais  Hotak,  chief  of  the  Ghilji  tribe  of  Kandahar  Province,  gained 



independence from  the  Safavid  Persians.  From 1722  to  1725,  his son  Mahmud  Hotak 

briefly  ruled  large  parts  of  Iran  and  declared  himself  as  Shah  of  Persia.  However,  the 

Hotak dynasty came to a complete end in 1738 after being toppled and banished by the 

Afsharids who were led by Nader Shah Afshar of Persia. 

The  year  1747  marks  the  definitive  appearance  of  an  Afghan  political  entity 

independent  of  both  the  Persian  and  Mughal  empires.  In  October  1747  a  loya  jirga 

(grand  council)  concluded  near  the  city  of  Kandahar  with  Ahmad  Shah  Durrani  being 

selected  as  the  new  leader  of  the  Afghans,  thus  the  Durrani  dynasty  was  founded. 

Despite being younger than the other contenders, Ahmad Shah had several overriding 


 

98 | 

P a g e


 

 

factors  in  his  favor.  He  belonged  to  a  respectable  family  of  political  background, 



especially since his father served as  Governor of Herat who died in a battle defending 

the Afghans. He also had a well-trained larger army and possessed a substantial part of 

Nadir Shah's treasury, including the world's largest Koh-i-Noor diamond.  

Early victories 

One  of  Ahmad  Shah's  first  military  action  was  the  capture  Ghazni  from  the 

Ghiljis,  and  then  wresting  Kabul  from  the  local  ruler.  In  1749,  the  Mughal  ruler  was 

induced to cede Sindh, the Punjab region and the important trans Indus River to Ahmad 

Shah in order to save his capital from Afghan attack.[16] Having thus gained substantial 

territories to the east without a fight, Ahmad Shah turned westward to take possession 

of Herat, which was ruled by Nader Shah Afshar's grandson, Shahrukh Afshar. Ahmad 

Shah  next  sent  an  army  to  subdue  the  areas  north  of  the  Hindu  Kush  mountains.  In 

short  order,  the  powerful  army  brought  under  its  control  the  Tajik,  Hazara,  Uzbek, 

Turkmen, and other tribes of northern Afghanistan. Ahmad Shah invaded the remnants 

of  the  Mughal  Empire  a  third  time,  and  then  a  fourth,  consolidating  control  over  the 

Kashmir and Punjab regions, with Lahore being governed by Afghans. He sacked Delhi 

in  1757,  but  permitted  the  Mughal  dynasty  to  remain  in  nominal  control  of  the  city  as 

long  as  the  ruler  acknowledged  Ahmad  Shah's  suzerainty  over  Punjab,  Sindh,  and 

Kashmir.  Leaving his second son  Timur Shah to safeguard his interests,  Ahmad Shah 

left India to return to Afghanistan. 



Relations with China 

Alarmed by the expansion of China's  Qing Dynasty up to the western border of 

Kazakhstan,  Ahmad  Shah  attempted  to  rally  neighboring  Muslim  khanates  and  the 

Kazakhs  to  unite  and  attack  China,  ostensibly  to  liberate  its  western  Muslim  subjects. 

Ahmad Shah halted trade with Qing China and dispatched troops to Kokand. However, 

with his campaigns in India exhausting the state treasury, and with his troops stretched 

thin  throughout  Central  Asia,  Ahmad  Shah  lacked  sufficient  resources  to  do  anything 

except to send envoys to Beijing for unsuccessful talks. 



Decline 

The victory at Panipat was the high point of Ahmad Shah's

and Afghan



power. 


However,  even  prior  to  his death,  the empire  began  to unravel.  In  1762,  Ahmad Shah 

crossed the passes from Afghanistan for the sixth time to subdue the  Sikhs. From this 

time and on,  the domination  and  control  of the  Empire began  to  loosen.  He  assaulted 

Lahore  and,  after  taking  their  holy  city  of  Amritsar,  massacred  thousands  of  Sikh 

inhabitants,  destroying  their  revered  Golden  Temple.  Within  two  years,  the  Sikhs 

rebelled  again  and  rebuilt  their  holy  city  of  Amritsar.  Ahmad  Shah  tried  several  more 

times  to  subjugate  the  Sikhs  permanently,  but  failed.  Ahmad  Shah  also  faced  other 

rebellions  in  the  north,  and  eventually  he  and  the  Uzbek  Emir  of  Bukhara  agreed  that 

the Amu Darya would mark the division of their lands. A decade after the third Battle of 

Panipat,  Marathas  under  the  leadership  of  Mahadji  Scindia  entered  and  recaptured 



 

99 | 

P a g e


 

 

Delhi in 1771, cutting off Rohillas from the Durranis forever. Ahmad Shah retired to his 



home  in  the  mountains  east  of  Kandahar,  where  he  died  on  April  14,  1773.  He  had 

succeeded  to  a  remarkable  degree  in  balancing  tribal  alliances  and  hostilities,  and  in 

directing  tribal  energies  away  from  rebellion.  He  earned  recognition  as  Ahmad  Shah 

Baba, or "Father" of Afghanistan.  



Other Durrani rulers (1772



1826)  

Ahmad  Shah's  successors  governed  so  ineptly  during  a  period  of  profound 

unrest that within fifty years of his death, the Durrani empire per se was at an end, and 

Afghanistan was embroiled in civil war. Much of the territory conquered by Ahmad Shah 

fell  to  others  in  this  half  century.  By  1818,  the  Sadozai  rulers  who  succeeded  Ahmad 

Shah  controlled  little  more  than  Kabul  and  the  surrounding  territory  within  a  160-

kilometer radius. They not only lost the outlying territories but also alienated other tribes 

and lineages among the Durrani Pashtuns. 



 

 

 

 

Timur Shah (1772



1793)  

Early life 

Timur Shah was born in  Mashhad[2][citation needed][page needed] in 1748 and 

had a quick rise to power by marrying the daughter of the  Mughal Emperor Alamgir II. 

He  received  the  city  of  Sirhind  as  a  wedding  gift  and  was  later  made  the  Governor  of 

Punjab, Kashmir and the Sirhind district in 1757 (when he was only 9 years old), by his 

father  Ahmad  Shah  Durrani.  He  ruled  from  Lahore  under  the  regency  of  his  Wazir, 

General  Jahan  Khan,  who  administered  these  territories  for  approximately  one  year, 

from  May  1757  until  April  1758.Timur  Shah  Durrani  was  defeated  by  the  Sikhs  in  the 

Battle of Gohalwar (Amritsar,1757). 

The  Sikhs  also  assisted  by  Adina  Beg  Khan,  Governor  of  the  Julundur  Doab, 

along  with  Raghunath  Rao  who  was  leading  the  Maratha  Empire,  forced  Timur  Shah 

and Jahan from Punjab and put in place their own government under Adina. 



Succession 

When  Timur  Shah  succeeded  his  father  in  1772,  the  regional  chieftains  only 

reluctantly accepted him, and most of his reign was spent reasserting his rule over the 


 

100 | 

P a g e


 

 

Durrani  Empire.  He  was  noted  for  his  use  of  the  Bala  Hisar  Fort  in  Peshawar,  as  the 



winter capital of his Empire.  

In  1776,  Timur  Shah  compelled  his  uncle  Abdul  Qadir  Khan  Durrani  to  leave 

Afghanistan. Abdul left Afghanistan and sent his family including his: wife Zarnaab Bibi, 

sisters  Azer  Khela  and  Unaar  Khela,  brother  Saifullah  Khan  Durrani,  nephews 

Mohammad  Umer  Durrani,  Basheer  Ahmad  Khan  Durrani  and  Shams  ur  Rehman 

Durrani  and  two  sons,  Faizullah  Khan  Durrani  and  Abdullah  Khan  Durrani  to  Akora 

Khattak,  in  present  day  Khyber  Pakhtunkhwa.  He  himself  went  to  Damascus  (Syria), 

where he (Abdul Qadir Khan Durrani) died in 1781. 

Timur  Shah  himself  left  twenty-four  sons,  and  the  succession  that  struggle  that 

followed  his  death  began  the  process  of  undermining  the  authority  of  the  Durrani 

authority.  Under  Timur  Shah's  eventual  successor,  Shah  Zaman,  the  empire 

disintegrated. In 1797 Shah Zaman, like his father and grandfather before him, decided 

to  revive  his  fortunes  and  fill  his  treasuries  by  ordering  a  full-scale  invasion  of 

Hindustan, the time-honoured Afghan solution to cash crises.  



 

 

Changes in rule 

During his reign, the Durrani Empire began to shrink. In an attempt to move away 

from  disaffected  Pashtun  tribes,  he  shifted  the  capital  from  Kandahar  to  Kabul  and 

chose  Peshawar  as  the  winter  capital  in  1776.  His  court  was  remained  influenced  by 

Persian  culture  and  he  became  reliant  on  the  Qizilbash  bodyguard  for  his  personal 

protection. 



Personality 

Timur  Shah  prided  himself  on  being  a  man  of  taste.  He  revived  the  formal 

gardens of the Bala Hisar Fort in Kabul, first constructed by Shah Jahan's Governor of 

Kabul. In this endeavour, he was inspired by his senior wife, a Mughal princess who had 

grown  up  in  the  Delhi  Red  Fort  with  its  remarkable  courtyard.  Furthermore,  like  his 

Mughal in-laws, he had a talent for dazzling display, such as in the way he dressed and 

groomed himself. 

Death 

Timur Shah died in 1793, and was then succeeded by his fifth son Zaman Shah 

Durrani. His tomb is located in Kabul. 


 

101 | 

P a g e


 

 

Early years 

He  seized  the  throne  of  the  Durrani  Empire  on  the  death  of  his  father,  Timur 

Shah. He defeated his rivals, his brothers, with the help of Sardar Payenda Khan, chief 

of the Barakzais. He extracted an oath of allegiance from the final challenger, Mahmud, 

and in return relinquished the governorship of Herat. In so doing, he divided the power 

base between Herat and his own government in Kabul, a division which was to remain 

in place for a century. Kabul was the primary base of power, while Herat maintained a 

state of quasi-independence. Kandahar was fought over for the spoils. 

During  his  reign  he  tried  to  combine  his  dispersed  relatives  together  who  were 

deported  by  his  father  Timur  Shah.  His  uncle  Saifullah  Khan  Durrani,  his  sons 

Mohammad Umar, Bashir Ahmad Khan and Shams Ur Rehman,  his cousins  Faizullah 

Khan and Abdullah Khan lived in Akora Khattak[citation needed] in present day Khyber 

Pakhtunkhwa. They were contacted to come back to Afghanistan but  without success. 

Saifullah Khan died in 1779 and after that the family was led by Faizullah Khan but he 

disliked  the  bad  habits  of  Abdullah  Khan  and  Bashir  Ahmad  Khan  and  left  Akora 

Khattak  and  went  to  Bannu  without  informing  his  relatives.[citation  needed]  Later  on, 

after the death of his wife, Abdullah Khan Durrani migrated to  Kohat in 1791 where he 

married a widow, Pashmina. 

Zaman Shah tried his best to recombine his family members and relatives so as 

to gain power but many of them were living an unknown life. Some of them have even 

been forgotten their identity. 

He  attempted  to  repeat  his  father's  success  in  India,  but  his  attempts  at 

expansion attempts were failed by the Sikhs and also brought him into conflict with the 

British. The British induced the Shah of Persia to invade Durrani, thwarting his plans by 

forcing him to protect his own lands. 

In  his  own  lands  things  went  well  for  Zaman,  at  least  initially.  He  was  able  to 

force  Mahmud from  Herat  and  into  a  Persian  exile.  However,  Mahmud established an 

alliance with  Fateh Khan,  with  whose support he was able  to strike back in  1800,  and 

Zaman  had  to  flee  toward  Peshawar.  But  he  never  made  it;  on  the  way,  he  was 

captured,  blinded  and imprisoned  in  Kabul,  in  the  Bala  Hissar.  Little  information about 

the rest of his life is available, but he was probably imprisoned for nearly 40 years, until 

his death, during which time Afghanistan continued to experience much political turmoil. 

Zaman Shah Durrani 

Early years 

He  seized  the  throne  of  the  Durrani  Empire  on  the  death  of  his  father,  Timur 

Shah. He defeated his rivals, his brothers, with the help of Sardar Payenda Khan, chief 

of the Barakzais. He extracted an oath of allegiance from the final challenger, Mahmud, 



 

102 | 

P a g e


 

 

and in return relinquished the governorship of Herat. In so doing, he divided the power 



base between Herat and his own government in Kabul, a division which was to remain 

in place for a century. Kabul was the primary base of power, while Herat maintained a 

state of quasi-independence. Kandahar was fought over for the spoils. 

During  his  reign  he  tried  to  combine  his  dispersed  relatives  together  who  were 

deported  by  his  father  Timur  Shah.  His  uncle  Saifullah  Khan  Durrani,  his  sons 

Mohammad Umar, Bashir Ahmad Khan and Shams Ur Rehman,  his cousins  Faizullah 

Khan and Abdullah Khan lived in Akora Khattak[citation needed] in present day Khyber 

Pakhtunkhwa. They were contacted to come back to Afghanistan but  without success. 

Saifullah Khan died in 1779 and after that the family was led by Faizullah Khan but he 

disliked  the  bad  habits  of  Abdullah  Khan  and  Bashir  Ahmad  Khan  and  left  Akora 

Khattak  and  went  to  Bannu  without  informing  his  relatives.[citation  needed]  Later  on, 

after the death of his wife, Abdullah Khan Durrani migrated to  Kohat in 1791 where he 

married a widow, Pashmina. 

Zaman Shah tried his best to recombine his family members and relatives so as 

to gain power but many of them were living an unknown life. Some of them have even 

been forgotten their identity. 

He  attempted  to  repeat  his  father's  success  in  India,  but  his  attempts  at 

expansion attempts were failed by the Sikhs and also brought him into conflict with the 

British. The British induced the Shah of Persia to invade Durrani, thwarting his plans by 

forcing him to protect his own lands. 

In  his  own  lands  things  went  well  for  Zaman,  at  least  initially.  He  was  able  to 

force  Mahmud from  Herat  and  into  a  Persian  exile.  However,  Mahmud established an 

alliance with  Fateh Khan,  with  whose support he was able  to strike back in  1800,  and 

Zaman  had  to  flee  toward  Peshawar.  But  he  never  made  it;  on  the  way,  he  was 

captured,  blinded  and imprisoned  in  Kabul,  in  the  Bala  Hissar.  Little  information about 

the rest of his life is available, but he was probably imprisoned for nearly 40 years, until 

his death, during which time Afghanistan continued to experience much political turmoil. 

Mahmud Shah Durrani 

His 1st and 2nd deposed 

Mahmud Shah Durrani was the half-brother of his predecessor, Zaman Shah.On 

July 25,  1801,  Zaman Shah was deposed, and Mahmud Shah ascended to ruler-ship. 

He then had a chequered career; he was deposed in 1803, restored in 1809, and finally 

deposed again in 1818. 

Trouble with Barakzai tribe 


 

103 | 

P a g e


 

 

His son Shahzada Kamran Durrani was always in trouble with Amir Fateh Khan 



Barakzai, the brother of Dost Muhammad Khan. After the assassination of Fateh Khan 

Barakzai  the  fall  of  the  Durrani  Empires  begun.  King  Mahmud  Shah  Durrani  died  in 

1829. The country was then ruled by Shuja Shah Durrani; another of his half-brothers. 

Shah Shujah Durrani 

Appearance 

According  to  Mountstuart  Elphinstone,  "The  King  of  Kabul  [Shah  Shuja]  was  a 

handsome man".  He  also  wrote "of an olive complexion with a thick black  beard.....his 

voice  clear,  his  address  princely."  Shuja  wore  the  Koh-i-Noor  diamond  in  one  of  his 

bracelets when Elphinstone visited him. William Fraser, who accompanied Elphinstone 

was  "struck  with  the dignity  [Shah  Shuja] of  his  appearance and  the  romantic Oriental 

awe..." Fraser also "judged" him to be "about five feet six inches tall" and his skin colour 

was  "very  fair,  but  dead...his  beard  was  thich  jet  black  and  shortened  a  little  by  the 

obliquely  upwards,  but  turned  again  at  the  corners....The  eyelashes  and  the  edges  of 

his eyelids were blackened with antimony" He also described Shuja's voice as "loud and 

sonorous". 

 

Marriage 

After coming to power in 1803, Shuja ended the "blood feud" with the  Barakzais 

and also forgave them. To create an alliance with them, he married "their sister" Wa'fa 

Begum. 


  

Career 

Depositions, imprisonments and alliances 

Shuja  Shah  was  the  governor  of  Herat  and  Peshawar  from  1798  to  1801.  He 

proclaimed himself as King of Afghanistan in October 1801 (after the deposition of his 

brother Zaman Shah), but only properly ascended to the throne on July 13, 1803. 

Shuja  allied  Afghanistan  with  the  United  Kingdom  in  1809,  as  a  means  of 

defending against an invasion of Afghanistan and India by Russia.  

In  June,  1809,  he  was  overthrown  by  his  predecessor  Mahmud  Shah and  went 

into exile in India, where he was captured by Jahandad Khan Bamizai and imprisoned 

at  Attock  (1811

2)  and  then  taken  to  Kashmir  (1812



3)  by  Atta  Muhammad  Khan. 

When  Mahmud  Shah's  vizier  Fateh  Khan  invaded  Kashmir  alongside  Maharaja  Ranjit 


 

104 | 

P a g e


 

 

Singh's army, he chose to leave with the Sikh army. He stayed in Lahore from 1813 to 



1814.  In  return  for  his  freedom,  he  handed  the  Koh-i-Nor  diamond  to  Maharaja  Ranjit 

Singh and gained his freedom. He stayed first in Punjab and later in Ludhiana with Shah 

Zaman.  The  place  where  he  stayed  in  Ludhiana  is  presently  occupied  by  Main  Post 

Office near Mata Rani Chowk and a white marble stone inside the building marking his 

stay there can be seen. 

In  1833  he  struck  a  deal  with  Maharaja  Ranjit  Singh  of  the  Punjab:  He  was 

allowed to march his troops through Punjab, and in return he would cede  Peshawar to 

the  Sikhs  if they  could  manage to  take  it.  In a  concerted  campaign  the following  year, 

Shuja marched on Kandahar while the Sikhs, commanded by General Hari Singh Nalwa 

attacked  Peshawar.  In  July,  Shuja  Shah  was  narrowly  defeated  at  Kandahar  by  the 

Afghans  under  Dost  Mohammad  Khan  and  fled.  The  Sikhs  on  their  part  reclaimed 

Peshawar. 

In  1838  he  had  gained  the  support  of  the  British  and  the  Sikh  Maharaja  Ranjit 

Singh for wresting power from Dost Mohammad Khan Barakzai. This triggered the First 

Anglo-Afghan  War  (1838

1842).  Shuja  was  restored  to  the  throne  by  the  British  on 



August 7, 1839,[8] 30 years after his deposition, but did not remain in power when the 

British left. He was assassinated by Shuja ud-Daula, on April 5, 1842.  



 

 

Ali Shah Durrani 

Sultan Ali Shah Durrani was ruler of  the  Durrani Empire from 1818 to 1819.  He 

was  the  son  of  Timur  Shah  Durrani,  and  the  penultimate  Durrani  Emperor.  He  was 

deposed by his brother Ayub Shah. 



Ayub Shah Durrani 

Ayub Shah, a son of Timur Shah, ruled Afghanistan from 1819 to 1823. The loss 

of  Kashmir  during  his  reign  opened  a  new  chapter  in  neighboring  Indian  history.  In 

1823, he was imprisoned by the  Barakzai, marking the end of the  Durrani dynasty. He 

fled to Punjab after buying his freedom and died there in 1837.  

Impact of Islam and Muslims in India  

According to historian Will Durant, "The Islamic conquest of India is probably the 

bloodiest  story  in  history".  By  the  estimate  of  Koenraad  Elst  the  population  of  Indian 

subcontinent  reduced  by  almost  80  million  between  1000  and  1525.[108]  In  course  of 

their  conquests  and  rule  in  India,  the  number  of  Muslims  in  India  increased  through 

Immigration and Conversion. The Ancient Indian Kingdoms in Afghanistan and Pakistan 



 

105 | 

P a g e


 

 

became Muslim majority areas, as did the Eastern Part of Bengal. This would ultimately 



lead to the Partition of India in 1947 after the end of British rule. 

Conversion theories 

Considerable  controversy  exists  both  in  scholarly  and  public  opinion  as  to  how 

conversion  to  Islam  came  about  in  Indian  subcontinent,  typically  represented  by  the 

following schools of thought  

1.  Conversion was a combination, initially by violence, threat or other pressure against 

the person.  

2.  As  a  socio-cultural  process  of  diffusion  and  integration  over  an  extended  period  of 

time into the sphere of the dominant Muslim civilization and global polity at large.  

3.  That  conversions  occurred  for  non-religious  reasons  of  pragmatism  and  patronage 

such as social mobility among the Muslim ruling elite  

4.  That  the  bulk  of  Muslims  are  descendants  of  migrants  from  the  Iranian  plateau  or 

Arabs.  


5.  Conversion was a result of the actions of Sufi saints and involved a genuine change 

of heart.  

An  estimate  of  the  number  of  people  killed  remains  unknown.  Based  on  the 

Muslim chronicles and demographic calculations,  an estimate was done by  K.S. Lal in 

his  book  Growth  of  Muslim  Population  in  Medieval  India,  who  claimed  that  between 

1000 CE and 1500 CE, the population of Hindus decreased by 80 million. Although this 

estimate  was  disputed  by  Simon  Digby  in  (School  of  Oriental  and  African  Studies), 

Digby suggested that estimate lacks accurate data in pre-census times. In particular the 

records kept by al-Utbi, Mahmud al-Ghazni's secretary, in the Tarikh-i-Yamini document 

several episodes of bloody military campaigns. Hindus who converted to Islam however 

were not completely immune to persecution due to the caste system among Muslims in 

India  established  by  Ziauddin  al-Barani  in  the  Fatawa-i  Jahandari,  where  they  were 

regarded as an "Ajlaf" caste and subjected to discrimination by the "Ashraf" castes.  

Critics  of  the  "religion  of  the  sword  theory"  point  to  the  presence  of  the  strong 

Muslim  communities  found  in  Southern  India,  modern  day  Bangladesh,  Sri  Lanka, 

western  Burma,  Indonesia  and  the  Philippines  coupled  with  the  distinctive  lack  of 

equivalent  Muslim  communities  around  the  heartland  of  historical  Muslim  empires  in 

South Asia as refutation to the "conversion by the sword theory". The legacy of Muslim 

conquest  of  South  Asia  is  a  hotly  debated  issue  even  today.  Not  all  Muslim  invaders 

were  simply  raiders.  Later  rulers fought  on to  win  kingdoms  and  stayed  to  create  new 

ruling dynasties. The practices of these new rulers and their subsequent heirs (some of 

whom  were  borne  of  Hindu  wives  of  Muslim  rulers)  varied  considerably.  While  some 

were uniformly hated, others developed a popular following.  According to the memoirs 

of  Ibn  Battuta  who  traveled  through  Delhi  in  the  14th  century,  one  of  the  previous 

sultans  had  been  especially  brutal  and  was  deeply  hated  by  Delhi's  population.  His 

memoirs also indicate that Muslims from the Arab world,  Persia and Turkey were often 

favored with important posts at the royal courts suggesting that locals may have played 


 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling