Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet46/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   63

523 

 

 



prevalence  of  obesity  among  surveyed  students,  who  had  limited 

instructional physical education in schools, thus supporting Hills' and Peters' 

conclusion since 1998 that nullan acquired contribu on to obesity depends 

largely  on  an  environment  that  promotes  excessive  food  intake  and 

discourages  physical  activitynull  (7).  The  propor on  of  nullobesenull 

students significantly increased with age. It was cautiously concluded that 

nullIf  this  trend  continues  it  can  be  alarming  to  the  general  status  of 

healthnull.  The  interest  in  studying  the  growing  epidemic  of  childhood 

obesity  was  shared  by  many  health  professionals  from  various  medical 

subspecialties; so they united to establish a scientific workforce to deal with 

the situation from  various dimensions and  in a multidisciplinary  approach 

expressed  in  the  formulation  of  the  Obesity  Research  Chair  at  King  Saud 

University  in  20082009.  Undergraduate  medical  students  of  King  Saud 

University  were  consequently  involved  in  being  part  of  an  investigating 

team  applying  the  Global  School-Based  Student  Health  Survey  (GSHS), 

which  is  concerned  with  promoting  healthy  lifestyle  practices  in  selected 

schools in Riyadh in 2008 and 2009 (8). Addi onally, school children were 

provided  with  typed  cards  recording  their  body  mass  indices  and  were 

taught to calculate them by themselves to improve their awareness and to 

keep track of their annual progress. The assumption that nullpublic health is 

threatened  by  the  existence  of  childhood  obesity  in  Saudi  Arabianull 

deserves to be investigated. Threats to the overall health of a community 

are generally based on population health analysis in terms of morbidity and 

mortality. The economic cost of obesity, with job loss and low productivity 

should also be considered. Additionally, a surveillance system is needed to 

assist health care leaders and decision makers on planning for the future. 

 

Obes Surg. 2008 Dec;18(12):1632-5. Epub 2008 Jun 4. 



Laparoscopic  Adjustable  Gastric  Banding  in  A  Morbidly 

Obese Patient with Situs Inversus Totalis. 

Matar ZS. 

King Khalid Hospital, Najran, Saudi Arabia. zafer_S_m@hotmail.com 

Abstract 

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is a commonly performed bariatric 

operation  worldwide.  The  presence  of  an  anatomical  variation  like  situs 

inversus demands preoperative assessment and preparedness on the part 

of the  surgeon. We  report a  laparoscopic gastric  banding performed  on  a 

morbidly obese patient with situs inversus totalis in the Kingdom of Saudi 

Arabia. 


524 

 

 



 

 

Ann Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008 Dec;14(6):369-75. 



Impact  of  Obesity  on  Early  Outcomes  after  Cardiac 

Surgery: Experience in a Saudi Arabian Center. 

Baslaim G, Bashore J, Alhoroub K. 

Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Cardiac Surgery Intensive Care Unit, 

Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and 

Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. 

Abstract 

PURPOSE:    The  prevalence  of  obesity  is  a  public  health  concern  in  most 

countries, including Saudi Arabia. Obesity has been considered a major risk 

factor for adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery. 

MATERIALS  AND  METHODS:    A  single-center  retrospec ve  review  (2001-

2005) of adverse outcome a er coronary artery bypass gra ing (CABG) and 

valve  surgery  (total=462)  categorized  by  body  mass  index  (BMI)  was 

performed. The pa ents with BMI>or=30 were defined as the obese group 

and pa ents whose BMI<30 were labeled as the nonobese group. 

RESULTS:    Overall,  315  (68.2%)  were  classified  as  nonobese,  and  147 

(31.8%)  were  obese.  Obese  patients  were  older  and  more  likely  to  have 

diabetes and hypertension. There were no significant differences between 

the two groups with regard to other comorbidity and risk factors. There was 

no  association  between  the  two  groups  and  the  outcomes  of  operative 

mortality and morbidities. 



CONCLUSION:  This study demonstrated that obesity does not increase the 

risk of death and most complications after cardiac surgery, aside from the 

unexplained increased risk of reoperation during the same admission. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

525 

 

 



 

 

Saudi Med J. 2008 Oct;29(10):1453-7. 



Spinal  Shrinkage  as  a  Measure  of  Spinal  Loading  in  Male 

Saudi  University  Students  and  its  Relationship  with  Body 

Mass Index. 

Yar T. 


Department of Physiology,  College of Medicine,  King Faisal University,  PO 

Box 


2114, 

Dammam 


31451, 

Kingdom 


of 

Saudi 


Arabia. 

talayyark@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  compare  spinal  shrinkage  in  obese  and  non-obese  young 

male adults and to find any correlation between them. 



METHODS:    In  2006,  123  second-year  male  students  studying  in  the 

Colleges  of  Medicine  and  Dentistry,  King  Faisal  University,  Dammam, 

Kingdom  of  Saudi  Arabia,  were  examined  for  their  weights,  standing 

heights, and recumbent lengths. In this cross-sectional observational study, 

the  students  were  grouped  according  to  body  mass  index  (BMI):  normal 

range BMI <25; overweight BMI = 25-29.9; obese-BMI >30. Spinal shrinkage 

was  calculated  as  the  difference  between  standing  height  and  the 

recumbent  length  of  the  subject.  Influence  of  BMI  on  the  magnitude  of 

spinal shrinkage was compared by analysis of variance, and the relationship 

between  spinal  shrinkage  and  BMI  was  tested  with  Pearson's  correlation 

test. 

RESULTS:    The  obese  group  presented  a  significantly  greater  reduction  in 

standing height (1.6% of recumbent length) compared to the normal group 

(1%) (p=0.019). Spinal shrinkage was found to be posi vely correlated with 

level of obesity (r=0.369). 



CONCLUSION:    Spinal  shrinkage  is  positively  correlated  to  BMI,  which 

represents  a  persistent  load  on  the  spine  in  obese  individuals.  This 

conveniently demonstrable adverse effect of obesity might well be used as 

an instrument to inspire individuals to change their lifestyles. 

 

 

 



526 

 

 



 

 

Adv Physiol Educ. 2008 Sep;32(3):237-41. 



Using  "Spinal  Shrinkage"  as  a  Trigger  for  Motivating 

Students  to  Learn  about  Obesity  and  Adopt  a  Healthy 

Lifestyle. 

Yar T. 


Department  of  Physiology,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Faisal  University, 

Dammam, Saudi Arabia. tyar@kfu.edu.sa 



Abstract 

Obesity is a global problem; however, relatively little attention is directed 

toward  preparing  and  inspiring  students  of  medicine  and  allied  medical 

sciences to address this serious matter. Students are not routinely exposed 

to  the  assessment  methods  for  obesity,  its  overall  prevalence,  causative 

factors,  short-  and  long-term  consequences,  and  its  management  by 

lifestyle modification. This physiology laboratory exercise involving students 

of medicine  (n  =  106)  was  developed to  1)  introduce  medical  students  to 

methods of  obesity  assessment  and to  differentiate  between  general  and 

abdominal  obesity,  2)  generate  an  interest  and  sensi vity  about  obesity, 

and 3) s mulate thinking about modifica on of their lifestyle in rela on to 

eating  habits,  weight  control,  and  physical  activity.  Spinal  shrinkage  (the 

difference between the standing height of a person and his/her recumbent 

length)  was  used  as  an  immediate  observable  parameter  to  demonstrate 

the  effect  of  adiposity.  Spinal  shrinkage  is  recognized  as  an  index  of  the 

compressive forces acting on the spine and is related to body mass index. A 

posi ve correla on (r = 0.365, P < 0.05) was observed between body mass 

index  and  spinal  shrinkage.  A  questionnaire  was  used  to  assess  student 

responses  to  this  exercise.  Students  were  motivated  to  engage  in  more 

physical  ac vity  (74%),  adopt  healthier  ea ng  (63%),  and  enhance  their 

knowledge  about  obesity  (67%).  They  expressed  keen  interest  in  the 

laboratory exercise and found the sessions enjoyable (91%). The laboratory 

exercise proved to be a success in motivating the students to actively learn 

and inquire about obesity and to adopt a healthier lifestyle. 

 

 

 



527 

 

 



 

 

Eur J Nutr. 2008 Sep;47(6):310-8. Epub 2008 Aug 1. 



Overweight  and  Obesity  and  their  Relation  to  Dietary 

Habits  and  Socio-Demographic  Characteristics  among 

Male  Primary  School  Children  in  Al-Hassa,  Kingdom  of 

Saudi Arabia. 

Amin TT, Al-Sultan AI, Ali A. 

Family  and  Community  Medicine  Dept,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Faisal 

University-Al Hassa, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. amin55@myway.com 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:  Several studies were carried out to study the prevalence of 

overweight  and  obesity  among  Saudi  children,  but  those  assessed  the 

association  between  eating  habits,  socio-demographic  differentials  and 

obesity in these children are scarce. 



OBJECTIVES:    To  assess  the  magnitude  of  obesity  and  overweight  among 

male primary schoolchildren and to find the possible association between 

obesity/overweight with dietary habits and socio-demographic differentials 

among them. 



STUDY  DESIGN  AND  METHODS:    A  cross-sectional  descriptive  study 

including 1,139  Saudi male  enrolled in  the  fi h and  sixth grades  in  public 

primary  schools  in  Al  Hassa,  KSA,  through  a  multistage  random  sampling 

technique,  submitted  to  interview  using  Youth  and  Adolescent  Food 

Frequency  Questionnaire,  gathering  data  regarding  dietary  intake,  some 

dietary habits, followed by anthropometric measurements with calculation 

of body mass index, the interpretation of which was based on using Cole's 

tables  for  standard  definition  of  overweight  and  obesity.  Socio-

demographics  data  were  collected  through  parental  questionnaire  form. 

Data  analysis  was  carried  out  using  SPSS  12  (SPSS  Inc.  Chicago,  IL,  USA), 

univariate as well as multivariate analyses were conducted. 

RESULTS:    The  age  ranged  from  10  to  14  years.  The  prevalence  of 

overweight among the included subjects was 14.2% while obesity was 9.7%, 

more in urban, older age students, mothers of obese and overweight were 

less educated, more working. Missing and or infrequent intake of breakfast 

at  home,  frequent  consumption  of  fast  foods,  low  servings  of  fruits, 

vegetables, milk and dairy product per day, with frequent consumption of 



528 

 

 



sweets/candy  and  carbonated  drinks  were  all  predictors  of  obesity  and 

overweight among the included male schoolchildren. 



CONCLUSION:    The  prevalence  of  childhood  obesity  is  escalating  and 

approaching  figures  reported  in  the  developed  countries.  Less  healthy 

dietary  habits  and  poor  food  choices  may  be  responsible  for  this  high 

prevalence. 

 

European  Journal  of  Nutrition,  2008  September,  47(6);310-318,  DOI: 



10.1007/s00394-008-0727-6  

Overweight  and  Obesity  and  their  Relation  to  Dietary 

Habits  and  Socio-Demographic  Characteristics  among 

Male  Primary  School  Children  in  Al-Hassa,  Kingdom  of 

Saudi Arabia  

Tarek Tawfik Amin, Ali Ibrahim Al-Sultan and Ayub Ali 



Abstract  

BACKGROUND :   Several studies were carried out to study the prevalence 

of  overweight  and  obesity  among  Saudi  children,  but  those  assessed  the 

association  between  eating  habits,  socio-demographic  differentials  and 

obesity in these children are scarce.  



OBJECTIVES :   To  assess  the  magnitude of  obesity  and  overweight  among 

male primary schoolchildren and to find the possible association between 

obesity/overweight with dietary habits and socio-demographic differentials 

among them.  



STUDY  DESIGN  AND  METHODS :    A  cross-sectional  descriptive  study 

including 1,139  Saudi male  enrolled in  the  fi h and  sixth grades  in  public 

primary  schools  in  Al  Hassa,  KSA,  through  a  multistage  random  sampling 

technique,  submitted  to  interview  using  Youth  and  Adolescent  Food 

Frequency  Questionnaire,  gathering  data  regarding  dietary  intake,  some 

dietary habits, followed by anthropometric measurements with calculation 

of body mass index, the interpretation of which was based on using Cole’s 

tables  for  standard  definition  of  overweight  and  obesity.  Socio-

demographics  data  were  collected  through  parental  questionnaire  form. 

Data  analysis  was  carried  out  using  SPSS  12  (SPSS  Inc.  Chicago,  IL,  USA), 

univariate as well as multivariate analyses were conducted.  

RESULTS :    The  age  ranged  from  10  to  14  years.  The  prevalence  of 

overweight among the included subjects was 14.2% while obesity was 9.7%, 



529 

 

 



more in urban, older age students, mothers of obese and overweight were 

less educated, more working. Missing and or infrequent intake of breakfast 

at  home,  frequent  consumption  of  fast  foods,  low  servings  of  fruits, 

vegetables, milk and dairy product per day, with frequent consumption of 

sweets/candy  and  carbonated  drinks  were  all  predictors  of  obesity  and 

overweight among the included male schoolchildren.  



CONCLUSION :    The  prevalence  of  childhood  obesity  is  escalating  and 

approaching  figures  reported  in  the  developed  countries.  Less  healthy 

dietary  habits  and  poor  food  choices  may  be  responsible  for  this  high 

prevalence.  

 

Saudi Med J. 2008 Sep;29(9):1319-25. 



Overweight  and  Obesity  in  the  Eastern  Province  of  Saudi 

Arabia. 

Al-Baghli NA, Al-Ghamdi AJ, Al-Turki KA, El-Zubaier AG, Al-Ameer MM, Al-

Baghli FA. 

Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, College of Medicine, King 

Faisal University, PO Box 63915, Dammam 31526, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 

nadiraa@windowslive.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To describe anthropometric characteristics of participants and 

the influence of sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors involved 

in the prevalence of obesity in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. 

METHODS:    In  the  year  2004,  all  Saudi  residents  in  the  Eastern  province 

aged  30  years  and  above,  were  invited  to  par cipate  in  a  community 

screening  campaign  for  early  detection  of  diabetes  and  hypertension. 

Demographic  data,  medical  history,  life  habits,  weight,  height,  blood 

pressure,  and  glucose  concentration  were  recorded  using  a  structured 

questionnaire.  Obesity  and  overweight  were  defined  by  body  mass  index 

(BMI)  >or=30  kg/m2  and  25-29.9  kg/m2,  respec vely.  Logis c  regression 

was  used  to  predict  the  association  of  the  significant  factors  with  the 

prevalence of obesity. 

RESULTS:    Out  of  195,874  par cipants,  the  overall  prevalence  of  obesity 

was 43.8%, while 35.1% were overweight. The prevalence of underweight 

was 1.3%. The peak prevalence of  obesity was observed in the age  group 

50-59  years.  Obesity  was  higher  among  women  than  men,  higher  in 

housewives,  and  among  the  less  educated  than  others  (p<0.0001).  Linear 


530 

 

 



regression  analysis  showed  a  strong  proportional  association  of  BMI  with 

diabetes,  hypertension,  triglycerides  and  cholesterol,  and  an  inverse 

proportional association with physical activity and smoking 

CONCLUSION:    Obesity  and  overweight  constitute  an  important  health 

problem  affecting  a  high  proportion  of  Saudi  population.  Addressing 

associated factors, and  enhancing public health  education is an  important 

aim to focus on for weight control. 

 

Wilderness Environ Med. 2008 Fall;19(3):157-63. 



Is  High-Altitude  Environment  a  Risk  Factor  for  Childhood 

Overweight and Obesity in Saudi Arabia? 

Khalid Mel-H. 

Department  of  Physiology,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Khalid  University, 

Abha, Saudi Arabia. mhkhalid999@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  describe  the  prevalence  of  childhood  overweight  and 

obesity  in  rural  high-  and  low-altitude  populations  of  southwestern  Saudi 

Arabia and to identify specific at-risk groups within these populations. 

METHODS:   A cross-sectional study was conducted on 912 school children 

and  adolescents  aged  6-15  years  born  and  living  permanently  at  high 

al tudes  (2800-3150  m)  and  972  children  and  adolescents  of  comparable 

ages born and living permanently at low al tudes (< or =500 m). Height and 

weight were measured. For children <10 years, the weight-to-height index 

according  to  World  Health  Organization  (WHO)  standards  was  used  for 

assessing overweight and obesity. For adolescents 10-15 years, overweight 

and obesity were assessed by age and gender-specific percentiles for body 

mass  index  based  on  the  WHO/National  Centre  for  Health  Statistics 

reference  population.  A  questionnaire  was  used  for  measuring  parents' 

socioeconomic status. 

RESULTS:  The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity at high and low 

al tudes  was  10%.  The  study  showed  that  some  school  children  and 

adolescents were at a significantly higher risk of developing overweight and 

obesity. Significant risk factors included moderate-to-high parental income, 

age > or =10 years, high-altitude birth and residence, and female sex (crude 

odds ra o 3.2 [95% CI, 1.8- 5.5], 2.3 [95% CI, 1.6-3.2], 2.1 [95% CI, 1.5-2.9], 

and  1.9  [95%  CI,  1.4-2.6],  respec vely).  A  mul variate  analysis  using  the 

direct  binary  logistic  regression  model  revealed  that  moderate-to-high 



531 

 

 



parental income, age > or =10 years, female sex, and high-altitude birth and 

residence were significant independent predictors of childhood overweight 

and  obesity.  (adjusted  OR  3.2  [95%  CI,  1.6-2.6],  2.6  [95%  CI,  1.8-3.8],  2.0 

[95% CI, 1.6-2.9], and 1.8 [95% CI, 1.3-2.6]), respec vely. 



CONCLUSION:    The  present  study  identified  risk  factors  for  childhood 

overweight and obesity in Saudi Arabia. Among these, high altitude was a 

significant  and  independent  factor.  Future  research  is  warranted  to 

evaluate the  exact mechanism  by which  a high-altitude  environment  may 

contribute to childhood overweight and obesity. 

 

Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2008 Sep;102(3):232-6. Epub 2008 Jul 11. 



Maternal Obesity and Neonatal Congenital Cardiovascular 

Defects. 

Khalil HS, Saleh AM, Subhani SN. 

Department  of  Biostatistics,  Epidemiology,  and  Scientific  Computing,  King 

Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To determine whether isolated congenital heart defects (CHDs) 

were associated with maternal obesity. 



METHOD:  In a retrospective study we compared the incidence and severity 

of isolated CHDs in the offspring of 428 women divided into 3 groups, one 

of women of normal weight (n=141), one of obese women (n=228), and one 

of morbidly obese women (n=59) according to their body mass index. 



RESULTS:  There  were  143  mild  (66.8%),  44  moderate  (20.6%),  and  27 

complex (12.6%) forms of CHDs in the offspring and septal defects were the 

most common (61.7%). No significant differences were found among the 3 

groups of women regarding the type or severity of CHDs in their respective 

offspring, or the corrective cardiac surgery required. 

CONCLUSION:    No  association  was  found  between  maternal  weight  and 

isolated CHDs in the offspring. 

 

 

 



 

532 

 

 



 

Eur J Nutr. 2008 Sep;47(6):310-8. Epub 2008 Aug 1. 



Overweight  and  Obesity  and  Their  Relation  to  Dietary 

Habits  and  Socio-Demographic  Characteristics  among 

Male  Primary  School  Children  in  Al-Hassa,  Kingdom  of 

Saudi Arabia. 

Amin TT, Al-Sultan AI, Ali A. 

Family  and  Community  Medicine  Dept,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Faisal 

University-Al Hassa, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. amin55@myway.com 



Abstract 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling