Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet18/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   38

190 Notes from Modogazi' Ziyaev’s lecture on  “Ya-Sin  Surah,” Bishkek,  Islamic Institute, June 24, 2003.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



188

wearing  the  hijab. 

She  had  always  been  a  talkative  woman,  but  after  becoming 

“religious” she became even more talkative.  She began preaching to me about Allah, hell 

and heaven, the first time she came to greet me.  I noticed that all our relatives and people 

in her neighborhood avoided her.

Just before I left for the States in the summer of 2005, my uncle was arrested for a 

second  time;  this  time  the  court  sentenced  him  to  two  years  in  jail.  When  my  father 

visited him in jail, he was  still holding strong onto his religious principles.  This time, he 

grew his beard long.

While  he  was  in jail,  his  seventeen  year  old  eldest  daughter  Giiljan  married  an 

Uzbek man  in  Jalal-Abad.  For  our relatives,  this  came  as  a  shock.  Later  they  found  out 

that  her  father  had  given  that  man,  who  is  also  a  HT,  the  permission  to  marry  his 

daughter.  He  took  Giiljan  as  a  second  wife.  The  man  was  married  and  had  several 

children.  Learning  that  the  man  was  already  married  and  that  he  is  also  an  Uzbek,  my 

aunts  brought  Giiljan  back  to  the  village.  After  about  a  month,  she  eloped  or  was 

kidnapped  again,  no one  knows the truth and my relatives just  gave up  and kept cursing 

her.  None  of  the  traditional  marriage  ceremonies  involving  relatives  and  parents  were 

done  for  her.  In  other  words,  Giiljan  did  not  have  her  grandparents’  and  other  close 

relatives’  blessing  before  getting  married.  The  last  news  from  her was  that  her husband 

divorced her  and  sent her back to her parents in  Kizil-Jar.  However,  my uncle  and  sister 

in-law  do  not  seem  to  feel  responsible  for  the  unhappy  life  of  their  young  daughter. 

Recently,  I  talked  with  my  paternal  aunt  Sirga  on  the  phone  and  she  quoted  Giiljan’s 

parents  who  said:  “Oh,  it  is  O.K.  She  will  see  what is  written  on  her forehead by  Allah

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


189

and will  get married  again to another  [HT]  man.”  However, this kind of attitude with no 

shame and honor is not tolerated in our Ogotur clan and also in Kyrgyz culture in general.

Conclusion

In  concluding  the  chapter  we  can  say  that  Islam  is  part  of  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakh 

identity.  Their  Muslim  identity,  however,  does  not  override  their  ethnic  identity  as 

Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs.  There  are  many un-Islamic  traditions,  customs,  and  socio-cultural 

values  rooted  in  their  nomadic  heritage  that  makes  the  Kyrgyz  real  Kyrgyz  and  the 

Kazakhs real Kazakhs.  Among many such important legacies of nomadic heritage are the 

funeral  customs  which  have  incorporated  many  Islamic  and  some  Soviet/Russian 

funerary  traditions,  but  yet  preserved  some  of the  main  ancient  rites  and  practices  (see 

Chapter 5). As the Kyrgyz writer and journalist Choyun Omiiraliev notes correctly “when 

Islam [or Sufism] began spreading among the nomadic Kyrgyz it was tolerant of the local 

customs  and beliefs.  Before  adopting  Islam,  Kyrgyz  knew  and believed  in  the  existence 

of the  one  and  only God  called  Tangri/Tengir (see  Chapter  6).  The  Islam  which  is  now 

being  promoted  in  Central  Asia by  fundamentalist  groups  such  as  HT  does  not  want  to 

tolerate anything that is un-Islamic or pre-Islamic.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


190

Chapter V: 

Kyrgyz Funeral Rites:  “Islamic In Form,  ‘Pagan’  In Content” 

Introduction

Now  I have  laid out what  Islam means to contemporary  Kyrgyz  in  the preceding 

chapter,  I  will  proceed  to  illustrate  how  this  Islam  mixes  and  interferes  with  other 

traditions by  giving  a detailed  account  of one  major custom that  shows  the interrelation 

clearly:  the  contemporary  Kyrgyz  funeral.  Many  important  aspects  of  Kyrgyz  funeral 

such  as  leaving  a  kereez,  final  words  of  the  dying  person,  koshok,  traditional  lament 

songs  and ash,  offering  of the  memorial  feast  are  closely related with  oral  tradition,  and 

the  only place  to  learn  about  them  are  the  oral  heroic  epics  which  contain  rich  cultural 

information  described  from  the  native  viewpoint.  Therefore,  I  make  extensive  use  of 

Kyrgyz  oral  epics  to  support  my  arguments.  I  will  later  be  providing  analysis  and 

examples  to  show  how  the  oral  literature  combines  tradition  and  at  the  same  time  is  a 

living and changing tradition.

Funerals  and  the  range  of customs  and  rituals  associated  with  them have  always 

been  a  significant  part  of Kyrgyz  social  life.  Since  their  adoption  of Islam,  the  Kyrgyz 

incorporated many Muslim funerary traditions, but did so without replacing some of their 

core  pre-Islamic  funeral  customs  and  rituals.  In  other  words,  the  Kyrgyz  have  been 

modifying  and  adapting  their  traditional  funeral  customs  to  new  religious  changes  and 

developments  by  incorporating  Islamic  elements,  but  preserving  the  essence  of  their 

native  pre-Islamic  beliefs,  practices,  and  social  values.  From  the  viewpoint  of orthodox 

Islam,  this  religious  syncretism  in  Kyrgyz  funerary  traditions  can  be  characterized  as

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


191

being Islamic in form, but “pagan” in content.  By saying Islamic in form, I refer to those 

external or formal elements such as Quranic recitations and Muslim ways of burial which 

the Kyrgyz adopted later, and by “pagan” (from the viewpoint of orthodox Islam),  I refer 

to many of the existing rituals of Kyrgyz death customs which are imbedded in their pre- 

Islamic worldview.  The official or formal part of the funeral involves the participation of 

an  Islamic  clergy,  i.e.,  the  imam  or  mullah  who  carries  out  specific  funerary  practices 

such  as janaza  and  taziya,  according  to  Shari’a  or  Muslim  way.  One  of the  important 

Muslim funerary rites  is the  frequent  recitation  from  Quran before,  during,  and  after the 

burial.  Every time  a new  mourner pays  a visit to the  house  of the  deceased,  a mullah  or 

some  other family member like  an elderly man recites  short excerpts  from Quran.  Every 

time a female visitor or group of women enters the funerary yurt and finishes crying  and 

greeting the mourners, a man steps into the yurt and begins reciting Quran,  a sign that the 

women should stop crying  and singing lament  songs.  This act gives the utmost authority 

to  Quran,  which  stands  above  all  other Kyrgyz traditional values  and funerary practices. 

However,  the  Kyrgyz  people,  especially  women  do  not  always  obey  this  highest 

authority.  In some cases,  some of those so-called “un-Islamic” or “pagan” Kyrgyz rituals 

and  practices  overpower  Quran.  For  example,  at  my  grandfather’s  funeral  I  observed 

several times that when  a close  female  relative  arrived,  she  simply ignored the recitation 

of Quran by a man and kept singing lament songs loudly.

Many  core  rituals  and  customs  associated  with  the  funeral  have  deep  roots  in 

Kyrgyz nomadic culture,  and due to this very recent historical connection,  the essence of 

funeral  customs  seem  to  resist  to  the  new  demands  and  changes  in  time  and  society.  In 

the  past,  both  the  Muslim clergy  and  the  atheist  Soviet/Communist  regime  opposed  and

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


192

banned  this  tradition,  but  it  was  able  to  survive  by  modifying  itself through  adaptation 

and  incorporation  of  new  religious  practices  and  ideas  both  from  Islam  and  modem 

Soviet/Russian  culture.  The  core  rites  of the  funeral  customs  remain  quite  conservative 

unto this  day.  When I say the core of the  tradition  I refer to the key customs  and rituals, 

representing the  socio-cultural  values  and  religious beliefs,  which  are  closely  associated 

with  their  nomadic  culture.  These  main  aspects  are:  carrying  out  the  kereez,  words  of 

testament of the deceased,  sending  out kabar, bad news to the close  and distant relatives 

and public  in  general,  uguzuu  (telling  the  family  members  and  close  relatives  about  the 

death),  erecting  of  a  yurt,  boz  iiy  for  the  funeral,  killing  animals  (mainly  horses  and 

sheep),  traditional mourning etiquette for women  and men regarding their “duties”  at the 

funeral  such as the  singing of koshoks (or joktoo)  lament songs  (for women) and okurtiii, 

crying  out  loud  (for  men),  receiving  and  accommodating  the  guests  with  a soyush,  i.e., 

allocating  sheep  for  groups  of  guests  no  more  than  twelve  people  in  neighboring 

yurts/houses  and  serving the  meat  according  to  the  age,  gender,  and the  status  of guests 

and, finally,  the burial.  Burial,  however,  does not  mark the  end of funeral and mourning. 

There follows all kinds of mini memorial feasts until the fortieth day memorial feast. Ash 

is  the  final  and  major  memorial  feast,  which  is  offered  after  one  year  or  whenever  the 

family can afford to offer it. All of these aspects will be discussed in detail later.

Different peoples in the world mourn their dead in different ways, but all cultures 

share common values in terms  of carrying out death rites  and memorial  services.  Like in 

Kyrgyz  culture,  in  rural  Greece,  for  example,  death  rites  involve  the  sequence  of 

memorial  services  called  “Trisayio”  referring to by the  date  of its  occurrence:  “stis  tris” 

(at three days), “stis enia” (at nine days), and “stis saranda” (at forty days), “sto examino”

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


193

(at  six  months)  and  “stis  hrono”  (at  one  year).  The  forty  day  memorial,  which  is  also 

known as “merasma,” i.e., “sharing or distribution, it is repeated one year after the death” 

is associated with the events in the life  of Christ, during forty days  after his resurrection. 

Christ  appeared  to  his  disciples  many  times  until  the  fortieth  day  he  ascended  into 

Heaven.191  The  food  that  is  distributed  at  funerals  and  memorial  services  is  believed  to 

find its way to the dead.192

Kyrgyz  funerals  and  rituals  associated  with  them  became  the  main  focus  of my 

research  in  my  hometown.  I  had  many  interesting  formal  and  informal  interviews, 

conversations, debates, and discussions with local elders, Muslim clergy, and my paternal 

uncle  Mirzakal,  who  is  the  active  member  of  the  radical  Islamic  group  Hizb-ut  Tahrir 

(HT). The funeral of my paternal grandfather, Kochkorbay and the memorial feast for my 

late  paternal  uncle  Abdi'kerim  were  the  most  memorable  events  at  which  I  personally 

experienced  all  the  important rituals  and practices  of a  Kyrgyz  traditional  funeral.  As  a 

grown-up  female  member  of  the  family,  I  carried  out  my  duties  at  their  funeral  and 

memorial  feasts.  As  tradition  required,  I  mourned  their  death  by  singing  lament  songs 

together  with  my  other  female  cousins  and  aunts  inside  the  yurt.  As  a  participant- 

observer,  I  closely  observed  how  other  people  inside  and  outside  of the  yurt  interacted 

with  each  other as  well  as  with those  visitors  who  came  to pay their last respects  to  the 

deceased  and  express  their  condolences  to  the  mourners.  At  my  grandfather's  ki'rki,



193

fortieth  day  memorial  and  my  uncle’s  one-year  memorial  feast,  jildik, 

with  the

191

Danforth, Loring M.  The Death Rituals o f Rural Greece.  Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University 

Pres,  1982. pp. 44-45.

192 Ibid., p. 47.

193 From “j'il,” year; a memorial feast making the one  year anniversary o f the deceased.  Unlike the ash,  it is 

carried out on a smaller scale. Many often, people offer jildik and ash at the same time.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



194

permission  of  my  great  uncles,  father,  and  grandmother,  I  videotaped  some  important 

parts of the main rituals without making my relatives too uncomfortable. Because I was a 

family member,  no one seemed to object to my videotaping, especially when  I explained 

the  importance  and  value  of  this  tradition  in  Kyrgyz  society  and  thus  also  for  my 

research.

I had a long and interesting interview with Moldoshev Bolot, the former director 

of our Kizil-Jar sovkhoz, state farm.194 Below I present excerpts from our conversation 

about the Islamic revival in Kizil-Jar and how it is influencing people’s attitude towards 

Islam and to local funeral customs.

In  Kizil-Jar,  people’s  attitude  towards  religion  [Islam]  has 

increased in comparison to the  Soviet period.  During the  Soviet period,  it 

was prohibited to go to a mosque and pray five  times a day.  Lenin  said in 

his  time  that  every person  has  the  freedom to believe  or not to believe  in 

religion.  He  also  said  that religion  should be  separate  from  the  state.  It  is 

still  so.  When  the  perestroika began,  even  the  ministers  fasted  during  the 

month  of  Ramadan.  Until  today,  many  of  them  fast.  Today,  religious 

practices  such  as going to  a mosque and praying  are done by the free  will 

of people,  no one forbids praying.  On the contrary, people  are told openly 

to help mosques by donating money and other materials.

During  the  time  of Manas  [semi-legendary  Kyrgyz  hero],  Kyrgyz 

believed in God. However, today’s Islam did not exist at that time. During 

Chingiz  Khan’s  period,  too,  people  practiced  their  own  native  religion.

Since 639  AC,  after the  Prophet Muhammad,  we  accepted  the religion  of 

Islam.  Islam became  spread  around the  world.  Many peoples  and  nations 

adopted Islam. Many people left Islam and converted to other religions for 

the sake of money.  Many poor people and beggars do so.  Our government 

allows religious practice as long as its politics do not interfere with theirs.



194  Bolot ake  is  the  neighbor  o f my  parents,  and  he  is  retired and  stays  at home  because  o f his  poor  health 

conditions. Every time I visited my parents, I would see him  sitting outside  on the street bench eager to talk 

to  people  who  were  passing  by.  So,  when  I  asked  him  whether  he  would  be  willing  to  tell  me  about  the 

socio-economic  history  o f Kizil-Jar,  and  about the  socio-cultural  changes  and developments that have been 

taking  place  since  the  Soviet  collapse,  he  was  very  happy  to  share  his  knowledge  and  views  with  me.  His 

young  daughter-in-law  kindly  served  us  tea  and  sweets  and  we  had  a  long  four-hour  interview,  which  he 

allowed me to tape-record.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



195

However,  today  mullahs  are  prohibiting  some  of our  customs,  especially  those 

related to funeral rites.  It is right that Quran prohibits the  slaughtering of any animal  and 

eating  food  for  the  first  three  days  at  the  deceased  house.  It  is  said  that  offering  of 

memorial  feasts  such  as  beyshembilik,  kirkl',  jildik,  and  ash  bring  economic  harms  and 

hardships  to  the  poor  people.  However,  people  do  not  follow  them,  because  these 

customs have penetrated too deep into their blood.  I said to mullahs for several times:  “If 

you  forbid  killing  an  animal  and  if it  is  written  in  Quran,  when  people  serve  you  pilaf 

with  a jilik,  (sheep  meat’s  primal  cut)  why  do  you  eat  it?!  If you  are  against  it  because 

Quran  says  so,  why  don’t  you  just  refuse  the  meal;  do  your  religious  service  to  the 

deceased  and  stand  aside  without  eating  any  food?!”  Chongdor  [big  shots]  are  also  to 

blame.  If a big shot that holds a government position and if his relative dies, he kills one 

or  two  mares.  Seeing  them,  do  you  think  people  would  stop  it?  When  Bekmamat 

Osmonov,  the  former  governor  of the  province  of Osh  [southern  Kyrgyzstan]  had  died, 

we went to pay our last respect to him.  The  entire village was  assigned to  accommodate 

the guests. One street was told to accept guests from the Aksi' region, the second from the 

Ala-Buka region, third from Bazar-Korgon, Nooken, etc.  That is what I mean when I say 

that the big shots are responsible for promoting this kind of lavish events.

At  my  grandfather’s  kirki and  uncle’s jildik,  I  witnessed  a  lot  of confusion  and 

frustration  among  my  uncles  and  other  townsmen  who  seem  to  have  been  lost  in  the 

“clash” 

between 


their 

pre-Islamic 

religious 

beliefs 


and 

practices 

and 

orthodox/fundamentalist Islamic ideas imposed from outside and by local members of the 



radical  Islamic  groups  such as the Hizb-ut-Tahrir.  Even though HT is  a banned religious 

group  in  Kyrgyztsan,  it  local  members  continue  to  carry out their missionary work with

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


196

the  goal  to  reform  or  purify  the  Kyrgyz  Islam  by  cleansing  it  from  all  “un-Islamic” 

elements  or  bid’ah,  religious  innovations.  Among  purist  Muslim  clergy  is  Ozubek  Aj'i 

Chotonov,  who  strongly  opposes  all  the  un-Islamic  Kyrgyz  customs,  especially  funerals 

rites and publishes booklets and articles on the problems of Kyrgyz Muslimness:

No  matter  how  wonderful  our  customs  are,  since  we  accepted 



musulmanchilik [muslimness], we must first find out whether our customs 

conform to our religion or not.  Otherwise,  any customary act,  which  does 

not conform  to  the  religion,  makes  that  person  an  infidel.  Religion  is  the 

law,  decree,  or order,  which came  from  God,  and no  one  has  the  right to 

violate  it....  Our  standing  with  one  of our  foot  in  Islam  and  the  other  in 

idolatry does not bring us  any dignity or kindness.195

The  official  and  orthodox  Islam,  Spiritual  Directorate  of  the  Muslims  of 

Kyrgyzstan,196  through fatwas,  religious  decrees  and  weekly  TV  program  called  Juma 



khutbas'i,  also  condemns  many  Kyrgyz  traditional  practices  and  beliefs,  which  do  not 

correspond to Shari’a laws. Local Muslim activists, dawatchis (missionaries) are sent out 

to  villages  and  towns  all  over  the  country  Through  the  newspaper  called  “Islam 

Madaniyafi”  (Islamic  Culture),  booklets  and  textbooks,  Muslim  clergy  and  theologians 

such as Ozubek Aj'i Chotonov publish articles on religious issues most of which deal with 

the Kyrgyz funerals. They try to explain the Kyrgyz people about what is right and wrong 

in their religious and funeral practices. Chotonov condemns Kyrgyz funeral rites as being 

irrelevant to Shari’ah and Muslim values:

Among  all  other  Muslim  peoples  and  nations  in  the  world,  death  is 

considered  a  normal  and  natural  experience  in  life  and  funeral  rites  are 

carried out quite easily and in orderly form according to Shari’a rules . . .

195 Chotonov, Ozubek Aj’i. Iymart sabagi (lyman Lesson). Bishkek: Technology Press Center, 2002. p. 229.

196 Formerly it was called SADUM in Russian which stand for “Spiritual Directorate of the Muslims of 

Central Asia” which existed from  1943-1991) h as to conform to the state ideology.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



197

Customs  such  as  waiting  for  a close relative,  or looking  for  a fat mare  or 

money and keeping the body for 3-4 days do not exist in any other nations 

other than Kazakhs and Kyrgyz....197

At  my  grandfather’s  funeral  and  my  uncle’s  memorial  feast,  heated  discussions 

took place  between  Kyrgyz  men  and  women  and  several  local  Hizb-ut-Tahrir members 

who,  among  many  other  things,  oppose  all  un-Islamic  elements  of  Kyrgyz  funeral 

customs.  Sitting inside the yurt together with my grandmother and my aunts, I listened to 

the interesting dialogues between local Hizb-ut-Tahrir members,  among them one  of my 

uncles,  and  my  great uncles  who  know  their  Kyrgyz  form  of Islam,  but lack the  textual 

religious knowledge of Quran.  My father,  as  an educated man  and historian who is quite 

knowledgeable  both  in  Kyrgyz  history  and  history  of Islam,  served  as  a  “moderator”  of 

the  discussions.  Sometimes,  when visitors  stopped coming,  I stepped out of the  yurt and 

joined  the  men’s  discussions.  The  Hizb-ut-Tahrir  members  tried  to  use  funerals  to 

promote  the  ideas  of  their  organization  and  to  lecture  the  Kyrgyz  on  their  un-Islamic 

customs  and  practices.  My  uncle  Mirzakal  insisted  that  his  father  should  be  buried 

immediately after his death and strongly opposed all the important customs and traditions 

of a  Kyrgyz  funeral,  such  as  the  erection  of  a  yurt,  slaughtering  of a  horse,  singing  of 

mourning songs by women,  the  loud crying of the men  standing outside of the  yurt,  and 

many other un-Islamic rituals.  However,  the elders  and women  did not listen to him and 

carried  out  all  the  essential  rituals  according  to  the  Kyrgyz  way,  because  without  these 

rituals  the  Kyrgyz  funeral  and  the  memorial  feast  would  not  be  complete.  Despite  the 

explanations  given  by  my  uncle  as  well  as  by  mullahs  and  imams,  who  base  their 

arguments  on  the  Quran  and  the  Sharia’h,  it  was  very  hard  for  ordinary  Kyrgyz  to




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling