Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet34/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   63
PARTICIPANTS:  Data  were  obtained  on  249  non-pregnant  urban  women 

aged 15 and older, who live in the city of Laayoune in South Morocco. Only 

subjects identified as Sahraoui origin were eligible for this investigation. 

MAIN  OUTCOME  MEASURE:  The  following  data  were  collected:  body 

weight,  height,  circumference  of  waist  and  hip,  calorie  intake,  physical 

activity, marital status, education level, and desire to lose weight. 

RESULTS: The  overall  prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity  was  30%  and 

49%,  respec vely,  and  was  found  to  be  very  high  in  younger  age  groups. 

The prevalence of abdominal obesity was also high and increased with age. 

Sixty-eight  percent  of  women  had  a  waist-to-hip  ra o  (WHR)  >  0.85  and 

76% had a waist circumference (WC) > or = 88. The calorie intake, the  me 

spent  in  a  walking  activity,  and  the  time  spent  in  traditional  sedentary 

occupation  were  associated  with  obesity.  The  prevalence  of  obesity  was 

higher among married women compare to unmarried women and was not 

influenced  by  education  level.  A  very  small  percentage  of  the  female 

population expressed a desire to lose weight. 



CONCLUSION:  High  prevalence  of  obesity,  even  in  young  adult  women, 

needs  immediate  attention  in  terms  of  prevention  and  health  education 

among the urban Sahraoui women. 

 

 



392 

 

 



Public Health Nutr. 2004 Jun;7(4):523-30. 

Anthropometry of Women of Childbearing Age in 

Morocco: Body Composition and Prevalence of 

Overweight and Obesity. 

Belahsen R

Mziwira M



Fertat F


Laboratory  of  Physiology  Applied  to  Nutrition  and  Feeding,  Training  and 

Research  Unit  on  Food  Sciences,  Chouaib  Doukkali  University,  School  of 

Sciences, BP 20, El Jadida 24000, Morocco. rbelahsen@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To  determine  the  prevalence  of  obesity  and  body  fat 

distribution  of  Moroccan  women  of  childbearing  age,  using  a  panel  of 

anthropometric measurements. 

DESIGN  AND  SETTING:  A  cross-sec onal  survey  conducted  in  1995  in  an 

agricultural  community,  El  Jadida  province  of  Morocco.  Weight,  height, 

waist  and  hip  circumferences  and  triceps,  biceps,  subscapular  and  supra-

iliac skinfold thicknesses were measured. Body mass index (BMI), waist/hip 

ratio  (WHR),  sum  of  all  and  sum  of  trunk  skinfold  thicknesses  were 

determined. 



SUBJECTS:  In  total,  1269  women  aged  15-49  years  from  urban  and  rural 

areas were surveyed. 



RESULTS:  The  means  of  all  anthropometric  measurements  including  body 

fat were higher in urban than in rural women and increased with age. Trunk 

fat  contributed  50%  of  total  fat.  Globally,  4.7%  of  women  were 

underweight (BMI<18.5 kg m(-2)), 35.2% were overweight or obese (BMI> 

or =25 kg m(-2)), 10.1% were obese (BMI> or =30 kg m(-2)) and 16.8% had 

central obesity (WHR>0.85). The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 

higher  in  the  urban  than  in  the  rural  area.  Underweight  prevalence 

decreased with age, whereas that of overweight and obesity increased. All 

anthropometric parameters adjusted for age increased with the increase of 

BMI and WHR. 



CONCLUSIONS:  Although  undernutrition  is  still  prevalent,  there  is  an 

alarming  prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity  in  Moroccan  women  of 

childbearing  age.  The  results  indicate  a  shift  in  this  country  from  the 

problem  of  dietary  deficiency  to  the  problem  of  dietary  excess,  and  alert 

one  to  the  necessity  of  establishing  an  intervention  to  prevent  obesity-

related  diseases.  It  is  necessary  to  address  which  of  the  anthropometric 

variables  studied  here  is  the  best  predictor  of  obesity-related  diseases  in 

this population. 



393 

 

 



 

Public Health Nutr. 2002 Feb;5(1A):135-40. 



Nutrition Transition in Morocco. 

Benjelloun S. 

Département  des  Sciences  Alimentaires  et  Nutritionnelles,  Institut 

Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II, Rabat, Morocco. jelloun@iav.ac.ma 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE: To analyse the nutritional transition in Morocco. 

DESIGN: Examination of Moroccan national survey data. 

RESULTS: Morocco is undergoing a demographic, epidemiological and social 

transi on.  The  urban  popula on  increased  from  29%  in  1960  to  53%  in 

1997.  Per  capita  gross  domes c  product  increased  steadily  from  1972  to 

1999. Life expectancy at birth increased to 70 years in 1999 from 47 years 

in 1962. Both infant and juvenile mortali es have decreased, from 92/1000 

and 69/1000 in 1982-87 to 46/1000 and 37/1000 in 1992-97, respec vely. 

In  parallel,  the  diet  changed  considerably:  the  intake  of  animal  products 

increased  while  that  of  cereals  and  sugar  remained  relatively  high, 

reflecting  the  specificity  of  Moroccan  dietary  habits.  The  rise  in  the 

consumption  of  meats  and  vegetables  was  accompanied  by  a  steady 

consumption  of  bread,  used  to  eat  the  sauce  in  which  the  meat  and 

vegetables are cooked. Sugar is mainly used in tea, the very sweet, national 

drink  consumed  throughout  the  day.  Under-nourishment  persists  among 

children  under  five  (23%  stun ng  and  10%  underweight  in  1997)  while 

overweight  is  rising  (9%  in  1997  compared  with  3%  in  1987  for  children 

under three). Among adults, overweight (body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg m(-

2)) increased from 26% in 1984 to 36% in 1998. It is higher among women 

(32% in 1984 and 45% in 1998) than among males (19% in 1984 and 25% in 

1998). It is also higher among urban popula ons (30% in 1984 and 40% in 

1998) than rural popula ons (20% in 1984 and 29% in 1998). Obesity (BMI > 

30kg m(-2)) increased from 4% in 1984 to 10% in 1998. Overweight seems 

to  be  positively  associated  with  economic  status  but  negatively  with 

education level. 

CONCLUSION: Overweight and obesity constitute major health problems in 

Morocco. 

 

 


394 

 

 



J Nutr. 2001 Mar;131(3):887S-892S. 

Diet Culture and Obesity in Northern Africa.  

Mokhtar N, Elati J, Chabir R, Bour A, Elkari K, Schlossman NP, Caballero B, 

Aguenaou H. 

Laboratory  of  Physiology  and  Nutrition,  Ibn  Tofaïl  University,  Kenitra, 

Morocco. mokhtarnajat@yahoo.com 

Abstract 

The  etiology  of  obesity  in  North  Africa  is  not  well  understood  and  few 

studies  shed  any  light  on  its  development  among  women.  This  study 

compiles  what  is  known  about  the  prevalence  of  obesity  and  its 

determinants  in  Morocco  and  Tunisia.  Results  from  the  authors'  two 

surveys  on  nutrition-related  disease  among  reproductive-age  women 

(sample  size:  2800)  and  their  children  (1200  children  under  5  y  and  500 

adolescents)  were  combined  with  data  from  four  national  income  and 

expenditure  surveys  (dating  from  1980)  to  assess  obesity  trends  and 

development in Morocco and Tunisia. Overall levels of obesity, identified by 

body  mass  index  (BMI)  >  or  =  30  kg/m(2),  were  12.2%  in  Morocco  and 

14.4% in Tunisia. Obesity is significantly higher among women than among 

men  in  both  countries  (22.7%  vs.  6.7%  in  Tunisia  and  18%  vs.  5.7%  in 

Morocco) and prevalence among women has tripled over the past 20 y. Half 

of all women are overweight or obese (BMI > 25) with 50.9% in Tunisia and 

51.3% in Morocco. Overweight increases with age and seems to take hold in 

adolescence,  par cularly  among  girls.  In  Tunisia,  9.1%  of  adolescent  girls 

are  at  risk  for  being  overweight  (BMI/age  >  or  =  85th  percen le). 

Prevalence of overweight and obesity are greater for women in urban areas 

and  with  lower  education  levels.  Obese  women  in  both  countries  take  in 

significantly more calories and macronutrients than normal-weight women. 

The percentage contribution to calories from fat, protein and carbohydrates 

seems to be within normal limits, whereas fat intake is high (31%) in Tunisia 

and carbohydrate  intake (65-67%)  is  high in  Morocco. These  are  alarming 

trends  for  public  health  professionals  and  policy  makers  in  countries  still 

grappling with the public health  effects of malnutrition and  micronutrient 

deficiencies.  Health  institutions  in  these  countries  have  an  enormous 

challenge  to  change  cultural  norms  that  do  not  recognize  obesity,  to 

prevent significant damage to the public's health from obesity. 

 

 



395 

 

 



OMAN 

International  Journal  of  Nutrition,  Pharmacology,  Neurological  Diseases,



 

2011;1(1):56-63



 

Mood Dysfunction and Health-Related Quality of Life 

Among Type 2 Diabe c Pa ents in Oman: Preliminary 

Study 

Masoud Y Al-Maskari

1

, Karin Petrini



2

, Ibrahim Al-Zakwani

3

, Sara S.H. Al-



Adawi

4

, Atsu S.S. Dorvlo



5

, Samir Al-Adawi

4

 

1

 Department of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, sultan 



Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, Muscat, Oman 

2

 Department  of  Psychology,  University  of  Glasgow,  Glasgow,  United 



Kingdom 

3

 Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine 



and Health Sciences, sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123, 

Muscat, Oman

 

4

 Department  of  Behavioral  Sciences,  College  of  Medicine  and  Health 



Sciences,  sultan  Qaboos  University,  P.  O.  Box  35,  Al-Khoudh  123,  Muscat, 

Oman 


5

 Department  of  Mathematics  and  Statistics,  College  of  Science,  Sultan 

Qaboos University, P. O. Box 35, Al-Khoudh 123 Muscat, Oman 

Abstract 

AIM:    A  temporal  relationship  exists  between  the  presence  of  affective 

disturbance, poor glycaemic control and complications in people with type-

2  diabetes.  The  objec ve  of  this  study  is  to  compare  the  performance  of 

patients diagnosed with type-2 diabetes and normoac ve group on indices 

of mood functioning and indices of health-related quality of life.  

MATERIALS  AND  METHODS:  In  2006-2007,  for  a  six-month  period, 

diabetics from Oman were screened for the presence of propensity towards 

psychiatric distress using Self-Reporting Questionnaire during their routine 

consultation at the diabetic clinic at a tertiary care hospital in an urban area 

of  Oman.  Those  who  fulfilled  presently  operationalised  criteria  for 

subclinical propensity towards affective disorders were further screened for 

affective functioning (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and indices of  


396 

 

 



general  well-being  or  health-related  quality  of  life  (Nottingham  Health 

Profile).  The  age-  and  sex-matched  controls  group  (n=40)  underwent  the 

same procedure.  

RESULTS:    Both  measurement  scales  used  in  the  present  study  indicated 

that  the  diabetic  group  had  significantly  poorer  quality  of  life  and  higher 

distress level than the non-diabetic group, with the exception of emotional 

reaction  for  which  the  non-diabetics  showed  poorer  health  than  the 

diabetics.  Additionally,  no  difference  between  groups  was  found  when 

compared for social isolation.  



CONCLUSIONS:    In  agreement  with  previous  studies  from  different 

populations,  people  with  diabetes  in  Oman  appear  to  have  marked 

affective functioning and impairment based on the indices of quality of life. 

The  present  finding  is  discussed  within  a  sociocultural  context  that  has  a 

direct bearing on the situation in Oman. 

 

Sultan Qaboos Univ Med J. 2010 Apr;10(1):80-3. Epub 2010 Apr 17. 



Clinically-Defined Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young in 

Omanis:  Absence  of  the  Common  Caucasian  Gene 

Mutations. 

Woodhouse  NJ,  Elshafie  OT,  Al-Mamari  AS,  Mohammed  NH,  Al-Riyami  F, 

Raeburn S. 

Department  of  Medicine,  College  of  Medicine  &  Health  Sciences,  Sultan 

Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. 

Abstract 

OBJECTIVES:  We are seeing a progressive increase in the number of young 

patients  with  clinically  defined  maturity  onset  diabetes  of  the  young 

(MODY)  having  a  family  history  suggestive  of  a  monogenic  cause  of  their 

disease and no evidence of autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). 

The aim of this study was to determine whether or not muta ons in the 3 

commonest forms of MODY, hepa c nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), HNF1α and 

glucokinase (GK), are a cause of diabetes in young Omanis. 

METHODS:  The study was performed at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital 

(SQUH), Oman. Twenty young diabetics with a family history suggestive of 

monogenic inheritance were iden fied in less than 18 months; the median 

age  of  onset  of  diabetes  was  25  years  and  the  median  body  mass  index 

(BMI)  29  at  presenta on.  Screening  for  the  presence  of  autoimmune 


397 

 

 



antibodies  against  pancreatic  beta  cells  islet  cell  antibody  (ICA)  and 

glutamic  acid  decarboxylase  (GAD)  was  negative.  Fourteen  of  them 

consented  to  genetic  screening  and  their  blood  was  sent  to  Prof.  A. 

Hattersley's Unit at the Peninsular Medical School, Exeter, UK. There, their 

DNA  was  screened  for  known  muta ons  by  sequencing  exon  1-10  of  the 

GCK and exon 2-10 of the HNF1α and HNF4α genes, the three commonest 

forms of MODY in Europe. 

RESULTS:   Surprisingly,  none  of the  patients  had  any of  the  tested  MODY 

mutations. 



CONCLUSION:    In  this  small  sample  of  patients  with  clinically  defined 

MODY, mutations of the three most commonly affected genes occurring in 

Caucasians  were  not  observed.  Either  these  patients  have  novel  MODY 

mutations  or  have  inherited  a  high  propor on  of  the  type  2  diabetes 

mellitus  (T2DM)  suscep bility  genes  compounded  by  excessive  insulin 

resistance due to obesity. 

 

East Mediterr Health J. 2009 Jul-Aug;15(4):890-8. 



Implications  of  the  Use  of  the  New  WHO  Growth  Charts 

on  the  Interpretation  of  Malnutrition  and  Obesity  In 

Infants and Young Children in Oman. 

Alasfoor D, Mohammed AJ. 

Department  of  Nutrition,  Ministry  of  Health,  Muscat, 

Oman


deena1@omantel.net.om 



Abstract 

We  examined  the  difference  in  the  prevalence  estimates  of  the  outcome 

indicators  for  the  new  World  Health  Organization  (WHO)  child  growth 

standard  reference  (WHO  2006)  and  the  Na onal  Center  for  Health 

Statistics  (NCHS)/WHO  reference  using  the  National  Protein-Energy 

Malnutrition  Survey  dataset.  Based  on  the  NCHS/WHO  reference,  overall 

prevalence  estimates  of  underweight,  wasting,  stunting  and  overweight 

were  17.8%,  7.4%,  10.9%  and  1.3%  compared  to  11.3%,  7.6%,  13.0%  and 

1.9%  respec vely  calculated  according  to  the  WHO  2006  reference: 

stunting and overweight showed statistically significantly higher estimates, 

whereas  underweight  was  statistically  significantly  lower.  The  differences 

were not consistent across age groups. 



398 

 

 



World Hosp Health Serv. 2009;45(1):26-31. 

Epidemiological  Transition  of  Some  Diseases  in  Oman:  A 

Situational Analysis. 

Ganguly SS, Al-Lawati A, Al-Shafaee MA, Duttagupta KK. 

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine and 

Health Sciences, Sultan, Qaboos University, Muscat, 

Oman



Abstract 



During the past 35 years Oman has undergone a rapid socioeconomic and 

epidemiological  transition  leading  to  a  steep  reduction  in  child  and  adult 

mortality  and  morbidity  due  to  the  decline  of  various  communicable 

diseases,  including  vaccine-preventable  diseases.  Good  governance  and 

planning,  together  with  leadership  and  commitment  by  the  government, 

has  been  a  critical  factor  in  this  reduction.  However,  with  increasing 

prosperity,  lifestyle-related  noncommunicable  diseases  have  emerged  as 

new  health  challenges  to  the  country,  with  cardiovascular  diseases, 

diabetes  and  obesity  in  the  lead  among  other  chronic  conditions. 

Appropriate  prevention  strategies  for  reducing  the  burden  of 

noncommunicable diseases are discussed. 

 

Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2008 Jun;6(2):129-35. 



Prevalence  and  Heritability  of  Clusters  For  Diagnostic 

Components  of  Metabolic  Syndrome:  The  Oman  Family 

Study. 

Lopez-Alvarenga  JC,  Solís-Herrera  C,  Kent  JW,  Jaju  D,  Albarwani  S,  Al 

Yahyahee S, Hassan MO, Bayoumi R, Comuzzie AG. 

Department  of  Genetics,  Southwest  Foundation  for  Biomedical  Research, 

San Antonio, TX, USA. jalvaren@sfbrgenetics.org 

Abstract 

BACKGROUND:  Prevalence and heritability of metabolic syndrome (MetS) 

vary  between  populations  according  to  the  currently  used  criteria.  We 

examined  combinations  for  joint  probabilities  and  heritabilities  of  MetS 

criteria from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment 

Panel  III  (NCEP),  World  Health  Organization  (WHO),  and  International 

Diabetes Federation (IDF) in a sample of Omani families. 



399 

 

 



METHODS:  We  included  1277  subjects  from  5  pedigrees.  The  likelihood 

ratio of diagnostic cluster dependence over clustering by chance was LDep 

=  P(dependent)/P(independent).  Heritabilities  were  adjusted  by  sex  and 

age. 


RESULTS: The highest LDep were central obesity (CO) +  high glucose level 

(HGl)  +  triglycerides  (IDF,  3.08;  NCEP,  4.38;  WHO,  3.17;  P  <  0.001). 

Triglycerides combined with any other component were the most common 

cluster. The lowest LDep for IDF were high blood pressure (HBP) + CO + low 

HDL-C (1.21, P < 0.025); for NCEP were HBP + HGl + low HDL-C (1.21, P < 

0.07).  These  components  were  gathered  almost  by  chance  alone.  In 

contrast, the lowest LDep for WHO were HGl + CO + low HDL-C (2.01, P < 

0.001).  The  WHO  criteria  yielded  the  highest  heritability  for  a  MetS 

diagnosis (h(2) = 0.9), followed by NCEP (0.48) and IDF (0.38). The ra onale 

of the MetS diagnostics is based on insulin resistance. This base would be 

lost if we continue lowering cut-off points for diagnosis for increasing  the 

sensitivity.  The  WHO  showed  the  highest  values  for  LDep  for  all 

components because they used the highest cut-off points. 

 

Public Health Nutr. 2008 Jan;11(1):102-8. Epub 2007 Jun 18. 



Body  Mass  Index,  Waist  Circumference  and  Waist-To-Hip 

Ratio  Cut-Off  Points  for  Categorization  Of  Obesity  among 

Omani Arabs. 

Al-Lawati JA, Jousilahti P. 

Department of Non-communicable Diseases Surveillance & Control, Muscat 

113, Ministry of Health, Oman. jallawat@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:    There  are  no  data  on  optimal  cut-off  points  to  classify 

obesity among Omani Arabs. The existing cut-off points were obtained from 

studies of European populations. 

OBJECTIVE:    To  determine  gender-specific  optimal  cut-off  points  for  body 

mass index (BMI),  waist circumference (WC)  and waist-to-hip ratio  (WHR) 

associated with elevated prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among 

Omani Arabs. 



DESIGN:  A community-based cross-sectional study. 

SETTING:  The survey was conducted in the city of Nizwa in Oman in 2001. 

400 

 

 



SUBJECTS  AND  METHODS:    The  study  contained  a  probabilistic  random 

sample of 1421 adults aged > or =20 years. Prevalent CVD risk was defined 

as  the  presence  of  at  least  two  of  the  following  three  risk  factors: 

hyperglycaemia,  hypertension  and  dyslipidaemia.  Logistic  regression  and 

receiver-operating  characteristic  (ROC)  curve  analyses  were  used  to 

determine optimal cut-off points  for BMI, WC and  WHR in relation to  the 

area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity. 

RESULTS:  Over 87% of Omanis had at least one CVD risk factor (38% had 

hyperglycaemia,  19%  hypertension  and  34.5%  had  high  total  cholesterol). 

All three indices including BMI (AUC = 0.766), WC (AUC = 0.772) and WHR 

(AUC = 0.767) predicted prevalent CVD risk factors equally well. The op mal 

cut-off points for men and women respec vely were 23.2 and 26.8 kg m-2 

for BMI, 80.0 and 84.5 cm for WC, and 0.91 and 0.91 for WHR. 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling