Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet35/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   63

CONCLUSIONS:  To identify Omani subjects of Arab ethnicity at high risk of 

CVD,  cut-off  points  lower  than  currently  recommended  for  BMI,  WC  and 

WHR  are  needed  for  men  while  higher  cut-off  points  are  suggested  for 

women. 

 

Sultan Qaboos Univ Med J. 2006 Dec;6(2):27-31. 



Correlation  between  Serum  Leptin  Levels,  Body  Mass 

Index and Obesity in Omanis. 

Al Maskari MY, Alnaqdy AA. 

Department of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences,  Sultan 

Qaboos University, P.O. 35 Al-Khod 123, Sultanate of Oman. 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To ascertain the relationship between serum leptin levels and 

related variables (weight, Body Mass Index (BMI) and fat percentage) in a 

group of Omani obese and non-obese healthy subjects. 

METHODS:   Lep n levels  were assessed  in serum  samples from  35  obese 

Omanis and 20 non-obese healthy subjects. 



RESULTS:    There  was  a  significant  difference  (p<  0.001)  in  serum  leptin 

between the obese group (34.78 + 13.96 ng/ml) and the control non-obese 

subjects (10.6 ± 4.2 ng/ml). Lep n levels were higher in females compared 

to males. There was a significantly positive correlation between leptin levels 

in  obese  subjects  with  weight  (p=0.002),  body  fat  percentage  (p=0.0001) 

and BMI (p=0.001). 



401 

 

 



CONCLUSIONS:    We  concluded  that  serum  leptin  levels  are  higher  in  the 

Omani obese group and correlate positively with body fatness and obesity. 

 

Popul Health Metr. 2006 Apr 24;4:5. 



Diabetes  and  Urbanization  in  The  Omani  Population:  An 

Analysis of National Survey Data. 

Al-Moosa S, Allin S, Jemiai N, Al-Lawati J, Mossialos E. 

The London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Health and Social 

Care, UK. sibalse@aol.com 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:    The  prevalence  of  type  2  diabetes  in  Oman  is  high  and 

appears  to  be  rising.  Rising  rates  of  diabetes  and  associated  risk  factors 

have  been  observed  in  populations  undergoing  epidemiological  transition 

and urbanization. A previous study in Oman indicated that urban-dwellers 

were  not  significantly  more  likely  to  have  diabetes.  This  study  was 

undertaken to determine if a more accurate urban and rural categorization 

would reveal different findings. 

METHODS:    This  study  included  7179  individuals  aged  20  years  or  above 

who  participated  in  a  cross-sectional  interviewer-administered  survey  in 

Oman  including  blood  and  anthropomorphic  tests.  Multiple  logistic 

regression analyses were conducted to analyze the factors associated with 

diabetes,  first  in  the  whole  population  and  then  stratified  according  to 

region. 


RESULTS:    The  prevalence  of  diabetes  (fas ng  blood  glucose  >  or  =  7 

mmol/l) in the  capital region  of Muscat was  17.7% compared  to 10.5%  in 

rural  areas.  The  prevalence  of  self-reported  diabetes  was  4.3%.  Urban 

residence  was  significantly  associated  with  diabetes  (adjusted  odds  ratio 

(OR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-2.1), as was age (OR = 1.2, 95% 

CI: 1.1- 1.2), obesity (abnormal waist circumference) (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.5-

2.1), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) 120-139 (OR = 1.4, 95% CI:1.04-1.8), 

SBP 140-159 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.4-2.6), SBP > or = 160 (OR = 1.7, 95% CI: 

1.2-2.5). Stra fied analyses revealed higher educa on was associated with 

reduced likelihood of diabetes in rural areas (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9). 

 

 


402 

 

 



CONCLUSION:    A  high  prevalence  of  diabetes,  obesity,  hypertension  and 

high cholesterol  exist  in the  Omani  population, particularly  among  urban-

dwellers  and  older  individuals.  It  is  vital  to  continue  monitoring  chronic 

disease in Oman  and to  direct public  health policy  towards preventing  an 

epidemic. 

 

Saudi Med J. 2005 Jan;26(1):96-100. 



Fetal Macrosomia. Risk Factor and Outcome. 

Mathew M, Machado L, Al-Ghabshi R, Al-Haddabi R. 

Department  of  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology,  PO  Box  35,  PC  123,  Sultan 

Qaboos University, Sultanate of Oman. mathewz@omantel.net.om 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:      To  determine  the  risk  factors  predisposing  to  fetal 

macrosomia  and  assess  the  maternal  and  perinatal  outcome  in  these 

patients. 

METHODS:  This was a retrospective analysis of all macrosomic deliveries in 

the  Department  of  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology,  Sultan  Qaboos  University 

Hospital, Sultanate  of  Oman,  during  a 3-year  period  from  January  2001  -- 

December  2003.  The  maternal  and  neonatal  records  of  infants  with  birth 

weight of > or =4000 g (n=275) were reviewed. Outcome variables included 

demographic profile, antenatal risk factors, mode of delivery and maternal 

and perinatal complications. 

RESULTS:  A total of 7367 deliveries occurred during the study period. The 

rate  of  macrosomic  deliveries  was  3.75%  and  the  rate  of  deliveries  >  or 

=4500 g was 0.48%. The mean birth weight of the study group was 4230 +/- 

220 g. Obesity, diabetes, prolonged gesta on and postpartum hemorrhage 

were significantly higher in the study group. The cesarean section rate was 

25.8%  for  the  study  group  compared  to  the  general  incidence  of  13.1% 

during the study period (p<0.0001). The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 

7.6% compared to the general incidence of 0.48% during the study period 

(p<0.0001).  There  were  7  cases  of  Erb's  palsy,  all  except  one  recovered 

without sequelae by 3 months of age. 



CONCLUSION:  Gestational diabetes,  maternal obesity, increasing age  and 

parity  were  the  main  risk  factors  for  fetal  macrosomia.  The  incidence  of 

shoulder  dystocia,  birth  injuries  and  neonatal  morbidity  increased  in  this 

group. 



403 

 

 



Saudi Med J. 2004 Mar;25(3):346-51. 

Prevalence and 10-Year Secular Trend of Obesity in Oman. 

Al-Lawati JA, Jousilahti PJ. 

Department  of  Non-Communicable  Diseases  Control,  Ministry  of  Health, 

Sultanate of 

Oman

. jallawat@omantel.net.om 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity by age, 

gender  and  region  and  to  assess  the  difference  between  rural  and  urban 

populations and determine the trends of the past decade. 

METHODS:    Analysis  of  na onally  represented  samples  from  2  cross-

sec onal surveys conducted in 1991 and 2000, containing 5,086 and 6,400 

Omani  ci zens  aged  >or=20  years.  Body  mass  index  (BMI)  (weight  in  kg) 

divided by height (in meters squared) was calculated using measured height 

and  weight  data.  Overweight  was  defined  as  BMI  25-29.9  kg/m2  and 

obesity as BMI >or= 30 kg/m2. 



RESULTS:  In the year 2000, the age adjusted prevalence of obesity reached 

16.7%  in  men,  compared  to  10.5%  in  1991  (p<0.001).  In  women,  the 

prevalence  was  23.8%  in  2000,  compared  to  25.1%  in  1991  (p=0.231). 

Similarly, the prevalence of overweight  increased among men, from  28.8-

32.1% (p=0.011) and decreased among women, from 29.5-27.3% (p=0.053). 

When  obesity  and  overweight  were  combined,  there  was  a  significant 

increase  in  men  (9.5%;  p  for  the  change  <0.001)  and  decrease  in  women 

(3.5%;  p  for  the  change  <0.003).  Obesity  and  overweight  combined  was 

markedly more common in the Southern part of Oman (70%) compared to 

Northern  areas  (32-57%).  People  living  in  urban  areas  were  more  obese 

(21.1%) than those living in the rural communi es (13.1%) (p<0.001). 

CONCLUSION:  The prevalence of obesity is high in Oman and has increased 

predominantly  among  men.  Primary  prevention  programs  are  needed  to 

counteract  this  condition  and  its  cardiovascular  and  metabolic 

complications. 

 

 


404 

 

 



Saudi Med J. 2003 Aug;24(8):875-80. 

The  Relation  of  Smoking  to  Body  Mass  Index  and  Central 

Obesity among Omani Male Adults

Al-Riyami AA, Afifi MM. 

Department  of  Research  and  Studies,  Ministry  of  Health,  Sultanate  of 

Oman. 


Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    Despite  the  prevalence  that  smoking  has  declined  in  many 

countries, there is a large increase in the number of young adults starting to 

smoke  and  in  per  capita  cigarette  consumption.  In  some  studies  smoking 

was associated with a lower body mass index (BMI) and increased waist hip 

ratio (WHR). Our aim is to study the association of smoking with BMI and 

WHR among male  adults aged  20 years and  above in  a community  based 

survey as a part of the Na onal Health Survey, 2000. 

METHODS:    A  cross  sectional  survey  representing  all  parts  of  Oman  was 

designed in the year 2000. A part of the survey was door to door interviews 

including  demographic  data  and  inquiry  regarding  current  and  former 

smoking for  male adults  aged 20  years  and above.  In addi on,  taking  the 

weight,  hip  and  waist  measurements,  blood  pressure  and  fasting  blood 

glucose for them. 



RESULTS:  The crude prevalence of current smoking was 13.3% among adult 

males  and  4.6%  of  them  were  former  smokers.  The  mean  BMI  was  not 

significantly  lower  among  smokers  than  never  or  former  smokers.  There 

was  no  significant  difference  also  regarding  WHR.  Adjus ng  BMI  by  10 

different  multiple  linear  regression  models  for  other  co-variates;  age, 

educational  level,  marital  status,  having  hypertension  and  total  fasting 

glucose intolerance revealed significant associa on in 3 of them of BMI with 

smoking status. Non-significant association was revealed for WHR. 



CONCLUSION:  Current smokers were of low BMI compared to non smokers 

and  ex  smokers,  and  currently  light  smokers  were  also  of  low  BMI 

compared  to  ex  smokers.  There  was  no  association  of  central  obesity  to 

smoking  status.  The  association  between  smoking  status  and  relative 

weight is modified by social factors as education. 

 

 



405 

 

 



Saudi Med J. 2003 Jun;24(6):641-6. 

Prevalence  and  Correlates  of  Obesity  and  Central  Obesity 

among Omani Adults. 

Al-Riyami AA, Afifi MM. 

Department of Research & Studies, Ministry of Health, PO Box 393, PC 113, 

Sultanate of Oman. afifidr@yahoo.co.uk 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    Overweight,  particularly  obesity  is  a  major  risk  factor  for 

several  important  diseases,  especially  hypertension,  coronary  heart 

diseases and diabetes mellitus. Our aim is to determine the prevalence of 

obesity and central obesity among Omani adults aged > or =20 years, and to 

identify  the  socio-demographic  and  health  variables  that  correlate  to 

obesity and central obesity in a community based survey (National Health 

Survey, 2000). 

METHODS:    A  community  based  cross-sectional  survey  representing  all 

parts of Oman was designed in the year 2000. A part of the survey was a 

door  to  door  interviews  including  demographic  data,  weight,  height,  hip 

and  waist  measurements,  blood  pressure  and  fasting  blood  glucose  and 

serum cholesterol for adults aged > or =20 years. 

RESULTS:    The  crude  prevalence  of  overweight  and  obesity  (body  mass 

index >25  kg/m2) was  47.9% for  the  whole sample,  and 46.2%  for  males, 

49.5%  for  females.  The  crude  prevalence  of  central  obesity  (abnormal 

weight hips  ra o) was  49.3% for  the whole  sample, 31.5%  for males,  and 

64.6% for females. Obesity and central obesity were less prevalent among 

younger age groups and highly educated subjects. Both obesity and central 

obesity  increased  the  odds  of  having  diabetes,  hypertension  and 

hyperchlostremia. 



CONCLUSION:  The prevalence of obesity and central obesity is quietly high 

in  Oman.  Launching  nutritional  programs  and  promotional  life  style 

modification programs are recommended. 


406 

 

 



Diabetes Care. 2003 Jun;26(6):1781-5. 

Prevalence  of  The  Metabolic  Syndrome  among  Omani 

Adults. 

Al-Lawati JA, Mohammed AJ, Al-Hinai HQ, Jousilahti P. 

Ministry  of  Health,  Non-communicable  Diseases,  Muscat,  Muscat,  Oman. 

jallawat@omantel.net.om 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome by age 

and  sex  in  the  Omani  population  as  defined  by  the  third  report  of  the 

National  Cholesterol  Education  Program  Expert  Panel  on  Detection, 

Evaluation,  and  Treatment  of  High  Blood  Cholesterol  in  Adults  (Adult 

Treatment Panel III [ATP III]) of North America. 

RESEARCH  DESIGN  AND  METHODS:    We  analyzed  data  from  a  cross-

sec onal survey conducted in 2001 containing a probability random sample 

of 1,419 Omani adults aged > or =20 years living in the city of Nizwa. The 

metabolic syndrome, defined by the ATP III, was defined as having three or 

more of the following abnormali es: waist circumference >102 cm in men 

and >88 cm in women, serum triglycerides > or =150 mg/dl (1.69 mmol/l), 

HDL  cholesterol  <40  mg/dl  (1.04  mmol/l)  in  men  and  <50  mg/dl  (1.29 

mmol/l) in women, systolic blood pressure > or =130 mmHg and/or diastolic 

>  or  =85  mmHg  or  on  treatment  for  hypertension,  and  fasting  serum 

glucose > or =110 mg/dl (6.1 mmol/l) or on treatment for diabetes. 



RESULTS:    The  age-adjusted  prevalence  of  the  metabolic  syndrome  was 

21.0%. The crude prevalence was slightly lower (17.0%). The age-adjusted 

prevalence was 19.5% among men and 23.0% among women (P =  0.236). 

Low  HDL  cholesterol  was  the  most  common  component  (75.4%)  of  the 

metabolic  syndrome  among  the  study  population  followed  by  abdominal 

obesity (24.6%). Abdominal obesity was markedly higher in women (44.3%) 

than in men (4.7%). 

CONCLUSIONS:    The  prevalence  of  the  metabolic  syndrome  in  Oman  is 

similar  to  that  in  developed  countries.  Future  prevention  and  control 

strategies should not overlook the importance of noncommunicable disease 

risk factors in rapidly developing countries. 

 

 


407 

 

 



Diabet Med. 2002 Nov;19(11):954-7. 

Increasing Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Oman. 

Al-Lawati JA, Al Riyami AM, Mohammed AJ, Jousilahti P. 

Research Department and Health Affairs, Ministryof Health, Muscat, 

Oman


Finland. jallawat@omantel.net.om 



Abstract 

AIMS:  To  determine  the  prevalence  of  diabetes  mellitus  and  impaired 

fasting glucose by age, gender, and by region and compare results with the 

1991 survey; and es mate previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in the 

Omani population. 



METHODS:  Cross-sectional survey containing a probability random sample 

of  5838  Omani  adults  aged  >or=  20  years.  Diabetes  and  impaired  fas ng 

glucose (IFG)  were assessed  by  fas ng venous  plasma glucose  using  1999 

World  Health  Organiza on's  diagnos c  criteria  (normoglycaemia  <  6.1 

mmol/l, IFG >or= 6.1 but < 7 mmol/l,and diabetes >or= 7 mmol/l). The 1991 

survey was reanalysed using the same diagnostic criteria, and results were 

compared. 

RESULTS:  In 2000, the age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes among Omanis 

aged  30-64  years  reached  16.1%  (95%  confidence  interval  (CI)  14.7-17.4) 

compared  with  12.2%  (95%  CI11.0-13.4)  in  1991.  IFG  was  found  among 

7.1%  (95%  CI6.2-8.1)  of  males  and  5.1%  (95%  CI  4.4-6.0)  of  females. 

Generally,  diabetes  was  more  common  in  urban  then  rural  regions.  Only 

one-third of diabetic  subjects knew that  they had diabetes.  Nearly half  of 

the study popula on had a body mass index > 25 kg/m2. 

CONCLUSIONS:    The  prevalence  of  diabetes  is  high  in  Oman  and  has 

increased over the past decade. The high rate of abnormal fasting glucose 

together with high rates of overweight and obesity in the population make 

it likely that diabetes will continue to be a major health problem in Oman. 

Primary prevention programs are urgently needed to counteract major risk 

factors that promote the development of diabetes. 

 

 

 



 

 


408 

 

 



PAKISTAN

 

Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print] 



Leptin  Deficiency  and  Leptin  Gene  Mutations  in  Obese 

Children from Pakistan. 

Fatima W, Shahid A, Imran M, Manzoor J, Hasnain S, Rana S, Mahmood S. 

Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Health 

Sciences , Lahore. 



Abstract 

Abstract Background: Congenital leptin  deficiency is a rare human genetic 

condition  clinically  characterized  by  hyperphagia  and  acute  weight  gain 

usually during the first postnatal year. The worldwide data on this disorder 

includes only 14 cases and four pathogenic mutations have been reported 

in  the  leptin  gene.  Study  objective:  The  objectives  of  this  study  were  to 

measure  serum  leptin  levels  in  obese  children  and  to  detect  leptin  gene 

mutations in those found to be leptin deficient. Patients and results: A total 

of  25  obese  children  were  recruited  for  the  study.  Leptin  deficiency  was 

detected  in  nine  of  them.  Leptin  gene  sequencing  identified  mutations  in 

homozygous  state  in  all  the  leptin  deficient  children.  Two  cases  carried 

novel  mutations  (c.481_482delCT  and  c.104_106delTCA)  and  each  of  the 

remaining seven the previously reported frameshi  muta on (c.398delG). 

Conclusion: The results suggest that leptin deficiency caused by mutations 

in the leptin gene may frequently be seen in obese Pakistani children from 

Central Punjab. 

 

Diabetic Medicine, July 2004;21(7):716–723,  



Ethnic  Differences  and  Determinants  of  Diabetes  and 

Central Obesity among South Asians of Pakistan 

T. H. Jafar

1,2,3,*

, A. S. Levey



3

, F. M. White

1

, A. Gul


1

, S. Jessani

1

, A. Q. Khan



4

, F. 


H. Jafary

2

, C. H. Schmid



5

, N. Chaturvedi

6

 

Abstract 



AIMS:  To  study  the  within  ethnic  subgroup  variations  in  diabetes  and 

central obesity among South Asians. 



METHODS:  Data  from  9442  individual  age  ≥ 15 years  from  the  National 

Health Survey of Pakistan (NHSP) (1990–1994) were analysed. Diabetes was 

defined  as  non-fasting  blood  glucose  ≥ 7.8 mmol/l,  or  known  history  of 


409 

 

 



diabetes. Central obesity was measured at the waist circumference. Distinct 

ethnic  subgroups  Muhajir,  Punjabi,  Sindhi,  Pashtun,  and  Baluchi  were 

defined by mother tongue. 

RESULTS: The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes varied among ethnic 

subgroups  (P = 0.002),  being  highest  among  the  Muhajirs  (men  5.7%, 

women 7.9%), then Punjabis (men 4.6%, women 7.2%), Sindhis (men 5.1%, 

women 4.8%), Pashtuns (men 3.0%, women 3.8%), and lowest among the 

Baluchis (men 2.9%, women 2.6%). While diabetes was more prevalent in 

urban vs. rural dwellers [odds ra o (OR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 

1.24,  1.82],  this  difference  was  no  longer  significant  a er  adjus ng  for 

central  obesity  (OR  1.15,  95%  CI  0.95,  1.42).  However,  the  ethnic 

differences  persisted  after  adjusting  for  major  sociodemographic  risk 

factors  (unadjusted  OR  for  Pashtun  vs.  Punjabi  0.59,  95%  CI  0.42,  0.84, 

adjusted OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37, 0.78). Ethnic varia on was also observed in 

central obesity, which varied with gender, and did not necessarily track with 

ethnic differences in diabetes. 

CONCLUSIONS: Unmeasured environmental or  genetic factors account  for 

ethnic variations in diabetes and central obesity, and deserve further study. 



 

Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2011 Jun;9(3):177-82. Epub 2011 Jan 19.



 

Is  there  any  Association  of  Serum  High-Sensitivity  C-

Reactive  Protein  with  Various  Risk  Factors  for  Metabolic 

Syndrome  in  A  Healthy  Adult  Population  of  Karachi, 

Pakistan? 

Riaz M, Fawwad A, Hydrie MZ, Basit A, Shera AS. 

Department of Medicine, Baqai Institute of Diabetology and Endocrinology, 

Baqai Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan. research@bideonline.com 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:    The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  discover  the  association  of 

serum  high-sensitivity  C-reactive  protein  (hsCRP)  with  various  risk  factors 

for metabolic syndrome in an urban population of Karachi, Pakistan. 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling