Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet28/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   38

310

311

Ibid., p.  8. 

Op.cit.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2 9 4

and  thinker,  Akseleu  Seydimbek  notes:  “It  is  bad  if  others  don’t  understand  you  (and 

your culture), but it is a tragedy if you don’t understand yourself.”312

As  in  many  post-colonial  nation  states,  after  the  collapse  of  the  Soviet  union, 

Kyrgyz  historians  and  writers  began  the  project  of  rewriting  history,  by  searching  for 

historical facts and unique socio-cultural values and traditions which would legitimize the 

Kyrgyz  people’s  existence  as  an  ancient  as  well  as  a  modem  independent  state.  Askar 

Akaev,  the  first  president  of the  independent  Kyrgyz  republic,  headed  the  country  from 

1991-2005.  During  his  presidency,  Akaev  promoted  the  national  ideology  under  the 

slogan  “Kyrgyzstan is  Our Common Home,” taking into consideration the  diverse ethnic 

composition of the country.  He  used the  epic Manas  as the  basis  for a national ideology 

by  extracting  seven  testaments  Manasfin  jeti  osuyat'i  from  Manas  for  Kyrgyzstan’s 

citizenship.  Akayev’s ideology seemed to work only on the official level.  Shortly before 

his  overthrow in March  2005,  Akayev published  a book titled Kyrgyz Statehood and the 



National Epic Manas.1 But, due to its price and limited print run, it failed to reach a wide 

audience. No one read the book besides a handful of historians and politicians.

The  world  of the  epic  Manas  is  very  rich.  Since  the  adoption  of Islam,  singers 

incorporated  many  Islamic  beliefs  and  practices  into  the  existing  native  religious 

worldview.  And that ancient worldview is not only found in oral tradition only, but in the 

everyday  life  relationships  of  Kyrgyz  people.  While  one  group  of  intellectuals,  local 

Muslim  clergy,  young  and  middle  aged  Kyrgyz  men,  who  went  to  study  in  Egypt  and 

Saudi  Arabia,  propose  the  religion  of  Islam  as  an  answer  for  personal  and  economic 

prosperity (see Chapter 4), the secular minded intellectuals, who also consider themselves

312 Seydimbek, Akseleu. Mir Kazakhov.  Etnokul’tum oe pereosmyslenie (The World o f the Kazakhs. 

Ethnocultural Rethingking). Almaty:  RAUAN, 2001, p.  13.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



295

Muslim,  search  for  their  ancient  roots,  for  something  that  offers  more  than  a  religious 

“dogma.”

Kazakh  and  Kyrgyz  intellectuals believe  that  it is  their centuries  of nomadic  life 

and culture which preserved the Kazakhs and Kyrgyz and their identities for thousands of 

years, and it is that cultural heritage, not the nomadic lifestyle itself, which will save them 

in  the  future.  It  is  argued  that  most  of  the  traditional  customs  and  spiritual  values 

stemming  from  their  nomadic  worldview  continue  to  play  an  important  role  in 

cotemporary  Kyrgyz/Kazakh  lives.  They  called  that  ancient  worldview  Tengirchilik 

(“Tengrianstvo”  in  Russian)  and  it  is  considered  to  be  the  native  worldview  of  all  the 

Altaic  peoples  of Central  Asia.  Tengirchilik has  not  lost  its  relevance  even  today,  they 

argue, therefore has to be raised to a national level and announced officially as a national 

ideology.

National Ideology and Native Intellectuals

The  emergence  of national  ideology  usually  takes  place  during  major  historical 

and political times  of transformation.  Tengirchilik is  an example of the kinds  of national 

ideology that is emerging in the post-Soviet, post-Cold War world.

Benedict  Anderson,  Ernest  Gellner,  and Eric  Hobsbaum  have  written  theoretical 

works  on  the  concept  of  nation  and  nationalism.  Among  these  well-known  western 

scholars,  Anthony D.  Smith’s presents a relevant theory to the growth of nationalism.  He 

suggests  that  “first  nations”  in  a given  region emerged around  a centralized  state,  which 

contained an easily identifiable dominant “ethnie.” The minor “ethnies had to conform to 

the  dominant  ‘ethnie’  that had a name,  a myth of descent,  a  shared history,  a distinctive

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


29 6

culture,  a homeland  and  a sense  of solidarity.  In  case  the  “ethnie”  did  not possess  these 

characteristics,  it  had  to  “rediscover”  and  articulate  them  in  order  to  legitimize  the 

existence of a nation.

National elites and intellectuals of all backgrounds have always played a key role 

in nation building processes in many countries,  as, e.g. Mongolia, Eastern Europe and the 

minority regions of China.  The  formation of Eastern European countries  as nation  states 

after  WWI  and  WWII  serves  as  one  of  the  best  examples.  Scholars  like  Katherine 

Verdery  characterize  the  local  intellectuals’  view  of  national  identity  as  “collectivist,” 

imagining the existence of a unified or homogeneous group of peoples or ethnic groups in



i n

each country. 

Polish  intellectuals  played  a key role  in  creating  Polish national  culture 

by  reviving  nationalist  sentiments  and  feelings  about  Poland’s  language  and  tragic 

history.  “Culture”  served  as  the medium  of Polish national  awakening and the feeling of 

belonging to a common homeland.314 In  a similar way, in  1918 the Czechs, who are now 

independent from  Soviet domination,  searched for their “origins”  as  a way to  show  their 

distinctiveness  or  “originality”  from  others.315  The  case  of Hungary  did  not  differ much 

from the rest of the region.  Folk culture and the nomadic background served as the main 

source  for Hungarian  national ideology,  identity  and  symbols.  Romanian politicians  and 

intellectuals believed in the existence of the Romanian nation as a “collective individual” 

and tried to institutionalize national ideology.316



313 National Character and National Ideology in Interwar Eastern Europe.  Edited by Katherine Verdery 

and Ivo Banac, New Haven: Yale Center for International and Area Studies,  1995.

314 Ibid., pp. 2-3.

315 Ibid., pp. 48-49.

316 Ibid., p.  104.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2 9 7

In analyzing the role  and motivations of intellectuals in general,  Verdery makes  a 

good point.  She does not view the people’s, mainly intellectuals’  choice of certain values 

and  preferences,  and  the  standards  of  their  scholarly  work,  as  a  political  will  to  gain

017

power. 


She  believes  that  these  genuine  attachments  of intellectuals  to  their  people’s 

traditional  values  are  created  “in  opposition  to  specific  others,  because  values  and 

preferences,  and  standards  are  multiple.  And  because  of  this  diversity  in  values  and 

standards,  their  genuine  goal  will  be  forced  to  compete  with  other  standards.  Their 

concerns  and activities may look like a political struggle, but at the same time, they bring 

“alternative” values into the “competitive relation.”318

Some Russian/Soviet scholars such as Valerii Tishkov,  director of the Institute of 

Ethnology  and  Anthropology  of  the  Russian  Academy  of  Sciences,  have  been  very 

critical  of the  nation  building  process,  which  took  place  in  the  non-Russian  successor 

states  after  the  Soviet  collapse.  Tishkov  is  the  editor  of  the  recent  book  Ethnicity, 



Nationalism  and  Conflict In  and After the  Soviet  Union?19  In  his  own  article,  he  argues 

that the  Soviet  discipline  of studying  ethnicity  or  national  identity  was  trapped between 

politics  and the theory of primordialism, which  sees  ethnicity  as  an objective  “given.”320 

He  identifies  two  approaches  in  the  study  of  ethnicity.  He  asserts  that  non-Russian 

national intellectuals and elites use ethnicity to gain social acclaim and political power in 

their  societies.  He  characterizes  this  approach  as  “instrumentalist.”  He  calls  the  second 

approach “constructivist,” where ethnicity is chosen by an individual or a group to satisfy

317 Ibid., p.  106.

318 Op.cit.

319 Tishkov, Valery. Ethnicity,  Nationalism and Conflict In and After the Soviet  Union:  The Mind Aflame. 

London, Thousand Oaks:  Sage,  1997.

320 Ibid., p. 7.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



298

their  personal  socio-cultural  needs  and  to  achieve  certain  goals.321  In  this  case,  the 

intellectuals do not necessarily play a “manipulative role” in the process of their identity 

formation.  Tishkov  is  very  critical  of those  non-Russian  intellectuals  and  scholars  who, 

instead  of writing  “solid  and  academic”  monographs,  concern  themselves  with  political 

activities  by  circulating  pamphlets  and  brochures.322  He,  however,  tends  to  see  these 

developments from his Russian/Soviet point of view. He does not seem to understand that 

it  is  quite  natural  for  the  local  intellectuals  of  smaller  nations  within  and  outside  of 

Russia,  especially  after  the  collapse  of the  Soviet  Union,  to  genuinely  feel  obligated  to 

promote and preserve their native language and traditional culture.

Such processes  are  not unique  to  Central  Asian  intellectuals.  In  the  early  1980s, 

very  similar  approach  to  national  identity  was  developed  among  the  intellectuals  of 

minority  peoples  of China  such  as  the  Yi.  During  these  years,  a  new  generation  of Yi 

scholars began rewriting their history in “revisionist terms” as a way of protesting against 

the  old  forms  of  scholarship,  influenced  by  Han-centrism.323  Pride  in  Yi  culture, 

language,  and  ethnic  identity  flourished  during  the  “economic  and  policy  reforms”  that 

took  place  in  China  in  the  1980s.  Yi  scholars  claim  that  everything,  which  has  been 

believed  to  be  Chinese,  such  as  the  “calendar,  writing,  Daoism,  and  the  yin-yang



'1 ‘J A

cosmology”  in  fact  belongs  to  the  Yi.” 

As  Harrell  and  Li  state  correctly,  it  is  more 

important to understand why they do what they do rather than trying to verify the validity 

of  their  writing.  During  the  Soviet  period,  like  the  Yi  scholars  in  China,  non-Russian

321  Ibid.,  12.

322 Ibid., p.  13.

323 Harrell, Stevan and Yongxiang, L i ,  “The History o f the History o f the Y i,” Part II.  In: Modern  China, 

Vol.  29, No.  3, July 2003, pp. 362-396.

324 Ibid., p.  381.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2 9 9

scholars could not write about their history and culture independently.  Everything had to 

be  written  in  the  “Marxist-Leninist  paradigm”  and  go  through  state  censorship  before 

being published.

Expression  of their  national  and  ethnic  identities  and  pride  in  their  own  native 

cultures  was  very  limited  among  the  non-Russian  and  non-Han  peoples  of  both 

multinational empires.  Almaz Han, who studied Mongol nationality issues, notes that the 

intellectuals  or  elites  of  various  minority  groups,  including  the  Inner  Mongols, 

themselves  actively  participate  in  the  official  process  of  minzufication,  from  minzu, 

minority group.325 He applies the theory of “subaltemity” which suggests the idea that the 

national  elites  mediate  between  their  own  people,  the  “oppressed,”  and  the  state 

“oppressor.”  The  longing  of the  Inner  Mongols  for  the  “ideal  or  imagined  homeland,” 

Outer Mongolia,  is  interpreted  as  a diaspora relationship, which  according  to the author, 

can  be  both  real  and  imagined.  Strong  nationalist  sentiments  usually  arise  when  the 

minority  groups’  existence  is  threatened by  the  titular  nation-state.  In  the  case  of Inner 

Mongolia,  the  persecution  of  the  members  of  the  New  Inner  Mongolian  People’s 

Revolutionary Party was  a wakeup call  to the  Inner Mongols.  That  generation,  to which 

Almaz Han himself belongs, played a key role in the revival  of ethnic movements during 

thel980’s.  They  spread  “nationalist”  ideas  about  Mongol  culture  and  language.  Even 

those  Mongols  who  were  basically  no  different  from  Chinese  farmers  and  had  no 

knowledge  of  Mongolian,  started  to  run  Mongol  language  schools.  More  and  more 

Mongols  began  to  appreciate  their  traditional  dress  and  wore  it  as  a  marker  of  their 

national  identity.  The  traditional  diet  of lamb  and  dairy  foods  as  well  as  their  material

325 Han, Almaz, X., pp.  20-31.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3 0 0

culture such as clothing, horse, and yurt and most importantly, Chingiz Khan, became the 

symbol of their national identity and unity.326

The  collapse  of the  Soviet  Union  in  1991  and  “the  collapse  of the  central  state 

legitimacy  after  1989”  in  China gave  local  intellectuals  and  scholars  freedom to express 

their  pride  and  respect  for  their  culture  and  identity.327  It  is  difficult  to  expect  “solid 

academic”  writings  free  of  any  nationalistic  sentiments  from  intellectuals  of  the  post­

colonial period.  It will take time for the old psychological wounds of colonial experience 

to  heal.  This  kind  of  nationalistic  approach  to  identity  among  the  smaller  nations  or 

minority  groups  did  not  and  does  not  grow  in  isolation.  According  to  some  scholars  of



328

Central Asia such as Ilse Cirtautas, “it is an act of survival, revival and self-defense.”

The  Central  Asian  intellectuals  also use  a “collectivist”  approach  when  speaking 

of their people’s national identities.  However,  it is easy to underestimate or dismiss their 

ideas  as being irrelevant  or false.  Yes,  some intellectuals may not have  a scholarly basis 

for  their  assertions,  their  theories  and  their  methodologies  may  not  conform  to  the 

standards  of world/western  scholarship.  We,  the  scholars  with  academic  training need to 

give  a  space  for  “semi-scholars”  like  writers  and  intellectuals  for  they  bring  forth 

alternative  approaches,  valuable  thoughts  and  new  ideas  from  which  we  can  learn. 

Besides, these intellectuals, writers in particular have more influence in Central Asia than 

scholars,  who  tend to use  a specialized  scholarly language  and detailed  analysis  that  are 

not easily comprehended by ordinary people.



326 Ibid., pp. 97-98.

327 Ibid., p. 383.

328 Written comments of Prof. Ilse Cirtautas, University o f Washington, January, 2007.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



301

Therefore,  it is more appropriate to treat the writings of such  “semi-scholars”  not 

as academic scholarship to be criticized and evaluated, but as phenomena to be explained. 

In  the  rest  of  this  chapter,  I  will  first  discuss  some  of  the  main  ideas  of  Tengirchilik 

explained by Choyun  Omuraliev,  who,  in  1994,  published  a  very  interesting book titled 

Tengirchilik.  Then  I  will  present  the  texts  of my  oral  interviews  that  I  conducted  with 

Choyun  Omuraliev  and  Dastan  Sarigulov  about  Kyrgyz  national  identity,  nomadic 

heritage,  and the idea of Tengirchilik as they were recorded.  The main point here is what 

they think  and how  they use  Tengirchilik,  not  whether it  is  accurate.  In  other  words,  it 

does not matter how we, the scholars and readers in general, understand Kyrgyz nomadic 

heritage  and  Tengirchilik,  but  rather  how  Kyrgyz  intellectuals  like  Dastan  Sarigulov 

portray and interpret these concepts and how Choyun Omuraliev understands Daoism and 

how  he  uses  it  in  building  his  Tengirchilik  philosophy.  My  task  would  be  to  provide 

commentary about  some  interesting concepts  and values  in  Kyrgyz  nomadic culture  that 

require additional explanation or background context.



The Ancient Turkic Worldview of 

Tengirchilik

 (Tengrianity)

In  November of 2003,  during  a  stay in  Bishkek,  I  was  invited to  attend  the  first 

international  scholarly conference  on  Tengirchilik,  which was  organized by the  “Tengir- 

Ordo  Foundation  for  the  Preservation  and  Development  of  [the  Kyrgyz]  National 

Heritage,” founded by Dastan Sarigulov. Before this conference took place,  I had already 

read  all  of  Dastan  Sangulov’s  small  booklets  and  articles  on  Tengirchilik  and 

Kyrgyz/Central  Asia  nomadic  culture.  So,  Tengirchilik was  not  a  new  idea to  me,  for  I

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



302

myself had been very much interested in  learning  about the  pre-Islamic  religious history 

of the Central Asian nomadic Turks, including the Kyrgyz.

The participants  in  the  conference were  mostly  Kazakh  and Kyrgyz  intellectuals, 

historians,  scholars,  poets,  and journalists.  It  was  not  a public  conference,  but  rather  an 

opportunity  for  intellectuals  to  share  their thoughts  and  ideas  about  Tengirchilik.  There 

were two scholars, Turkologists, from abroad: Takashi Osawa from Japan, and Wolfgang 

Scharlipp  from  Germany.  I  translated  the  German  scholar’s  presentation  from  English 

into  Kyrgyz.  The  working  languages  at  this  two-day  conference  were  Kyrgyz,  English, 

and Russian.  Dastan  Sarigulov opened the conference with his paper titled “Tengrianity 

and  the  Global  Problems  of Modernity.”  The  other  papers  presented  at  the  conference 

addressed  the  following  issues  relating  to  Tengirchilik:  “The  Metaphysics  of 

Tengrianity,” “Tengrianity:  Religion or Philosophy,” “Aspects of the Cult and Culture of 

Tengri According to the Ancient Turkic Inscriptions of the Yenisei Basin,” “Essentials of 

Tengrianstvo  and  the  Spectrum  of its  Spread;”  “Tengrianstvo  (Tengrianity)—Mirror  of 

the Nomadic World;” “Origins of Tengrianity;” and “Islam and Tengrianity.”329

One  of the  main  arguments  of the  presenters  was  that  the  Inner  Asian  religious 

system of beliefs should not be characterized as “shamanism” which only shows one side 

of a larger picture.  In  their  opinion,  “shamanism,”  which has  become  a well-established 

term in world scholarship, is misleading when used to describe the nature of the religious 

worldview  of the  Turkic  peoples.  They  asserted  that  their  ancient  worldview  should  be 

called  Tengirchilik  (from the  ancient Turkic word:  tangri,  which means both  “Sky”  and



329 “Tengrianity is the Worldview of the Altaic People,”  (Collections of Papers in Russian and English 

Languages), The First Internation Scientific  (Scholarly) Conference. Bishkek,  Kyrgyz Republic, November 

10-13, 2003. Bishkek:  “Tengir Ordo” Foundation, 2003.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



303

“God”)-  It  is  said  that  Tengirchilik  is  rather  a broad  philosophical  concept,  which  goes 

beyond  “shamanic” beliefs  and practices.  It is  argued that the  worldview  of Tengirchilik 

offers  more  valuable  and  sophisticated  ideas  about  life,  nature,  and  human  relationships 

than orthodox Islam or Christianity.

In  1994  Choyun  Omuraliev  published  an  exceptional  book  titled  Tengirchilik 

(Tengrianity,  288  pages).  Written  in  an  artistic  style,  the  book  contains  substantial  and 

important  material  about  Tengirchilik.  I  personally  find  the  book  extremely  interesting 

and enlightening in terms of the  new materials,  sources,  and  approaches provided by the 

author. If translated into western languages and particularly into Chinese, the book would 

definitely  be  a  valuable  contribution  to  Daoist  scholarship  and  thus  create  interesting 

discussions among the scholars of Daoism.

Omuraliev  begins  his  book  by  searching  for  a  “philosophy”  or  “idea”  which 

would  “preserve  the  essence  and  the  unique  face  of the  [Kyrgyz]  nation.”330  The  author 

finds  that  philosophy  which  he  describes  as  “the  longest,  greatest  and  most  arduous

-J O   1


endless WAY (JOL)?” 

This WAY,  which he calls  Tengirchilik, is  a three-dimensional 

system  of relationships  between  Kok  (Sky),  Jer  (Earth),  and  Kishi  (Man),  who  stands 

between first the two. 

Therefore, the term “shamanism” is incomplete, for the shaman,

' I l ' J

who is also a Man, constitutes only one part of the three-dimensional relationship. 

This 


ancient  diiyndtaanim,  worldview  of  Tengirchilik,  instead  of  surviving  as  a  separate 

religious  dogma,  has  deeply  integrated  into  the  everyday  life  of  the  Kyrgyz  (and 

Kazakhs), who,  until today, very much value many of its ideas  and apply them into their

330



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling