Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet27/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   38

292 RFERL, August  1,  2006

293  Urkiin  1916:  tar'ikhly-darektiiU ocherkrter. Edited Kengesh Jusupov, Bishkek:  Ala-Too jurnalimn bash 

redaktsiyasi,  1993.

294 Kubat Chekirov, August  1,  2006

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



283

those perished.  People in the Barksoon village prepared for the ash by erecting yurts  and 

killing  horses  and  sheep.295  According  to  funeral  etiquette,  when  the  men,  who 

participated  in  the  expedition,  returned  from  burying  the  dead,  they  approached  those 

yurts  by  crying  out  loud.  This  way  the  male  family  members  communicate  to  those 

mourning female family members.

Despite  the  current  difficult  financial  and  economic  conditions,  the  traditions  of 

offering ash requires killing of a horse  (which costs between $500-700 USD) and several 

sheep.  Without  an ash,  the  Kyrgyz  funeral  rite  is  considered  incomplete  and ash,  as  the 

final  memorial  feast,  brings  a  closure  both  to  the  deceased‘s  spirit  and  to  the  mourning 

family who is left behind.  Ideally ash should be offered after a year, but people can offer 

it  when  their  financial  and  economic  situations  allow  them.  As  we  learned  from  the 

recent  ash  offered  for  victims  of the  1916  uprising,  ash  must  be  offered  even  after  90 

years have past.



Sook koyuu

, Burial

Burial  customs  appear  in  different  forms  in  different  cultures.  In  some  cultures,

like  Hindu,  people  bum  the  deceased  body,  and  but  many  cultures  around  the  world

including Islamic, bury their dead under the ground.

The  main  terms  and  expressions  associated  with  a  Kyrgyz  burial  give  us  some

idea  about  the  ancient  burial  practices  of  nomadic  Kyrgyz.  The  Kyrgyz  say:  “Sooktii

koyuu,”  “Burying the bones (not the body)” and “sookko tiishuu,” “falling into the bones

(washing the body).”  Archeological  diggings  of ancient burial  sites  show  that the  Turks



295 RFERL, July, 27, 2006

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2 8 4

scrapped  the  flesh  off  the  deceased’s  body  and  only  buried  the  bones.  We  find  the 

remnants  of this  ancient practice in the  Kyrgyz epic Manas where we  find the  following 

lines:  “ki'mi'z  menen juudurup,  kili'ch  menen  ki'rdiri'p,’’  i.e.,  “  she  [his  wife  Kanikey]  had 

his body washed with koumiss  and had his flesh  scrapped off the bones.” When the hero 

Manas  dies,  his  wise  wife  Kanikey  buries  his  bones  secretly.  The  epic  gives  a  very 

detailed  and  interesting  account  of  the  hero’s  burial,  which  is  organized  by  his  wife. 

Another  assumption  is  that  in  the  past,  many  soldiers  were  killed  in  the  battlefields  of 

foreign lands and therefore, it was difficult to carry the bodies for long distances. In order 

that the bodies would not get  smelly or rotten, they separated their bones  from the  flesh. 

In the past, when Kyrgyz lived in high mountains, when a person died in wintertime, they 

could not bury him/her him under the ground because the ground would be  frozen.  They 

wrapped  the  body  in  a  felt  and  hung  it  in  between  the  tree  branches.  The  body  stayed 

there until spring and was buried when the ground was soft enough to dig.

Since  the  adoption  of  Islam,  most  of  the  burial  customs  in  Central  Asia  have 

become Islamized.  Today when it comes to following Islamic rules, the nomadic  Kyrgyz 

and Kazakhs strictly obey the burial procedures dictated by Quran.

In  “The Memorial Feast for Kokotoy Khan,” one of the main episodes of the epic 



Manas,  as part of his kereez, testament, the  Khan tells his advisor exactly how he should 

be buried:

Asfima altin tak kili'p, 

Place a golden throne  [wooden plate] under me

Ak istampilga orotup, 

Have my body wrapped in white muslin,

Asemdep oliik jatkirip, 

Treat my dead body with dignity,

Akiret ketken men iichiin 

For me, who has left for the other world,

Arbin diiyno zarp kili'p, 

Spend much wealth,

Kili'ch menen ki'rdiri'p, 

Have my flesh scraped off with a sword

Ki'mi'z menen juudurup, 

And washed it with koumiss,

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


285

Ayak menen bashimd'f 

Ki'mkap menen buudurup, 

Say torbgo karmati'p, 

Sarbap menen buudurup, 

Zamzam menen juudurp, 

Charaynaga chaptati'p, 

Shayingige kaptatip, 

Irchilarga maktatip, 

Ijiktarga saktati'p.



297

Aalamdi'n baari'p jiydiri'p, 

Shariyatka siydinp,

Kette, kichik iygarip,

Eki jiiz ming koy aydap, 

Tokson ming kara mal baylap, 

Burak atin tokutup,

Janazasi'n okutup,

Tabi'tka sali'p kotorup, 

Bidiyasin otkorup,

Salootu namaz-janaza 

Sap-sap bolup janasha, 

Karagan menen koz jetpeyt, 

Kiyki'rip aytsa soz jetpeyt,

Okup namaz bolushup, 

Tekbirin aytip koyushup, 

Sejidesiz namaz okushup,

Chongtoru degen kiilugiin 

Burak atka tokushup,

Bay Kokotoy babangdin 

Koyulgani sho boldu,

Dubalap salgan topurak

Bir dobodby too boldu.

300

Have my legs and head 

Tied with a kimkap silk,

Have my body be held only by nobles,

And wrapped with a sarbap silk,

9Q /I


Washed with Zamzam 

water 


Dressed with armor 

Placed on a camel 

Have me praised by singers 

And guarded by fjiks . . .

He gathered the entire world 

And did according to Shari’a,

He offered food to old and young,

He killed two hundred thousand sheep,

And ninety thousand cows,

He had his  [father’] horse saddled and 

harnessed with all the decorations,

And janaza298 read for his father,

They carried his body on a tabi’t,299 

And held his bidiya,

For the janaza prayer 

People lined up in rows,

One couldn’t see the end of the line,

One’s words couldn’t reach even if one 

shouts,

Upon finishing the prayer



And saying about his glory

Upon finishing their prayer without

touching the ground with their head

They saddled and fully harnessed his horse

Named Chongtoru

The wealthy ancestor Kokotoy

Was buried in that way,

The dirt which people put into his grave

while praying

Became like a mountain.



296 Zamzam is the  well near the Ka’bah, Mecca.  The  water is considered to have special spiritual powers. 

Newby D.  Gordon. A  Concise Encyclopedia o f Islam.  Oxford:  Oneworld, 2002, p.  216.

297 Manas. Version by Sagi'nbay Orozbakov, p.  11.

298 Janaza is a funerary prayer for the deceased and it is rcited after the body is washed and ready to be 

buried.

299  Tabi't is a flat wooden board on which the deceased’s body is carried to the burial ground.

300 Manas. Version by  Sagi'nbay  Orozbakov, p. 47.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



286

These  verse  lines  show  a  strong presence  of Islamic  burial  customs.  All  these  terms  are 

loan words  from Arabic.  Since  it was  not  an  ordinary burial, but  a burial  of a Khan,  the 

epic  singer  gives  a  very  elaborate  description.  One  needs  to  keep  in  mind  that  the  epic 

was  recorded  from  singers  who  lived  in  the  19th  century  when  Islamic  influence  was 

strong.  If the  singer  has  a  good  knowledge  of Islamic  burial,  he  demonstrated  it  in  his 

song.

Most  Kyrgyz  are  familiar  with  this  religious  terminology  of the  burial  tradition. 



And  all  Central  Asian  Muslims  follow  Islamic  burial  procedures  such  as  washing  the 

deceased’s body and wrapping in a white  shroud, reciting janaza, prayer before the body 

is taken out of the house.  In sedentary societies such as Uzbeks and Tajiks, each mahalla 

or village has a mosque  and gravediggers whom people  can hire.  The deceased’s body is 

usually taken to the mosque for washing, wrapping and reciting the janaza. The nomadic 

Kyrgyz  did  not  have  mosques  in  the  mountains  and  specialists  such  as  washers  and 

gravediggers.  Therefore,  until  today,  mostly  distant  male  relatives  dig  the  grave.  The 

body  of the  deceased is  kept,  washed  and  wrapped  in  one  side  the  yurt behind  a  special 

curtain.  In Islam,  “the closest relatives of the deceased have the primary right to bathe the 

deceased.”301  If the deceased is male, only close male relatives and friends will wash the 

body, if the diseased is female,  female relatives will have the honor to wash.  Often,  some 

people  leave  a  kereez,  testament  about  who  should  be  given  the  honor  to  wash  his/her 

body.  Kyrgyz  still follow their tribal identity strictly when it comes to burial customs.  If 

a  wife  dies,  only  female  relatives  from  her  own  family  side  or  tribe  wash  the  body, 

because her bones belong to her own kinsmen.  A married woman always has the support

301  Dr. Muhamad Abdul Hai  ‘Arifi.  The Islamic  Way in Death. Translated by Ahkame-e-Mayyit.  Karachi- 

74550, Pakistan: Idaratul-Qur’an Press,  2001, p. 40.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



287

of her  torktin,  kinsmen,  even  when  they  die.  In  Islam washing  the  body  is  considered  a

sacred task.  It is  said “the Holy Prophet has  said that the person who bathes the  body of

the  deceased is  as  cleansed  of sins  as  a new-born  child;  and the person  who  dresses  the

deceased in a shroud will be dressed with the  apparel of Paradise by Allah Almighty.”

Quran  dictates:  “When  one  of  your  men  dies,  do  not  keep  him  in  the  house  for  long.

Make haste in taking him to the grave and in burying him” 

In other words,  “all funeral

arrangements  should be  swift  . . . .   it  is  not  appropriate  that the  dead body  of a Muslim

should  be  left  to  stay  amidst  his  family  members  for  long.”304  Kyrgyz  Muslim  scholar

Chotonov gives the following reason for the necessity of a swift burial in Muslim culture:

The first thing is the meyit,  the  deceased.  He has  the  right to be buried  as 

soon as possible.  His body must be washed before it gets cold. He must be 

washed,  wrapped  in  a  shroud,  read janaza  and  buried.  Because  his  new 

home will be the grave where he will be questioned. His tongue should not 

be frozen during the questioning. It is very bad if the deceased’s body gets 

stinky because janaza  should  not be  read  to  him,  for janaza  has  its  own

TOS


special rules and condition.”

The janaza prayer must be recited for every Muslim before the burial. And the Kyrgyz do 

follow  this  important condition of Quran.  An imam or mullah  leads janaza  according to 

the practice of Prophet  Muhammad:  “The body  of the  deceased is placed  in front  of the 

Imam  who  leads  the  prayer.  The  Imam  stands  in  line  with  the  chest  of  the  deceased. 

Everyone in the congregation makes the following intention:  (niyyah:) “’I intend to offer 

the salah of janazah in devotion to Allah Almighty and in prayer for the deceased.’”306

302 Ibid., p. 40

303 Ibid., p. 34

304 Ibid., p. 33.

305 Chotonov, pp. 232-233.

306 Dr. Muhamad Abdul Hai  ‘Arifi, p. 72.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



288

When it comes to the Islamic burial  arrangements, the Kazakhs and Kyrgyz never

accepted the rule that the dead must be buried as  soon  as possible usually within twenty-

four hours.  When  I asked my grandmother what  she  thought  of this  issue  of burying the

dead  as  soon  as  possible  and  thus  not  killing  any  animal,  she  strongly  objected  it  by

saying:  “It  is  our  custom  from  the  past.  How  can  you  bury  the  dead  without  killing  an

animal?!  It will be equal to the burial  of a dog’s carcass!  When I die,  I want to be buried

like  a  human  being,  not  like  a  dog!”  My  great  uncle  Anarbay  also  expressed  strong

sentiments about it:

I learned that keeping the body for one or two days does not do any harm.

The  Uzbeks  say  that  it  is  a bad  sign  for  the  dead body  to  stay  overnight 

i.e.,  the  outcome  will  be  bad.  The  Uzbeks  bury  their  dead  even  by  a 

lantern,  they do not let it  stay overnight.  As for us,  we  keep it up to three 

days. We think that after living this long in this house, he/she cannot fit in 

it  for  three  or  four  days?!  If  there  are  close  relatives  coming  from  far 

away,  we  wait  for  them.  Because  it  is  important  to  see  one’s  parent, 

brother  or  sister,  wife  or  husband  before  burial  for  the  last  time.  Even  if 

he/she  is  dead,  they  will  have  the  chance  to  see  his/her  face.  If you just 

bury him without any rituals, he will  go away just like that.  However,  our 

father raised  three  of us,  including  his  many  grandchildren.  Since  he  has 

done  a lot  of service  to us,  we  must return  that service.  We tried our best 

to  help  and respect  him  he  was  alive,  but  we  must  send  him  to  the  other 

world  with  the  same  dignity  and  respect.  It  is  not  good  to  bury  him 

immediately right after his death as if you are happy to get rid of him. This 

is our Kyrgyz custom, but there are some cases when people bury the dead 

immediately.

Here my uncle noted the following about the Uzbek burial custom:

Among  the  Uzbeks,  however,  there  is  only  one  body  washer.  Usually, 

there  is  one  body  washer  in  each  village.  They  even  have  special 

gravediggers who prepare the graves.  You just need to inform them about 

a death and they will prepare everything.  Among us, the  Kyrgyz,  we  give 

nice  coats  for  those  who  wash  the  body.  We  call  this  tradition  sookko 



tiishiiU,  i.e.,  washing  the  bones.  This  tradition  exists  only  among  the 

Kyrgyz.  Even  when  an  old  woman  dies,  her  best  respected  friend  or

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


2 8 9

relative  washes  her  body  and  receives  nice  clothes  which  had  been 

prepared by the deceased before her death.

Kyrgyz Cemeteries and Funerary Monuments.

Islam forbids  any marking on  a Muslim grave  and all Muslims  should follow  the 

practice of Prophet Muhammad, who is said to have never raised a grave high by building 

tombs with bricks, stones or other materials. In Islam “ . . .  all the structures such as dome 

or  cupola  over  the  grave  are  “bidd’ah”,  recent  religious  innovations,  and  thus 

reprehensible (makrooh).”307

The Kyrgyz usually chose an elevated area such as a hilltop or a pass to bury their 

dead.  Unlike  in  Islam,  Kyrgyz  mark their  grave  with  all  kinds  of structures  as  a  sign  of 

respect  for  the  dead.  As  Privratsky  notes  correctly  about  the  religious  landscape  of 

Central  Asia:  “Mosques  and  minarets  dominate  the  skylines  of  the  great  cities  of  the 

Muslim  world,  but  on  the  vast  stretches  of hinterland  where  there  are  no  skylines,  the 

shrines of Muslim saints and the graves of ancestors are the most accurate markers of the 

Muslim identity of the  people.”308 When traveling through the  Kyrgyz  territory one  sees 

gravesites  of various  shapes  and  structures  which  have  mixed  Islamic,  pre-Islamic  and 

Soviet/Russian  elements.  It  is  common  to  put  a  metal  frame  of a  yurt  [very  un-Islamic] 

with  Moon  and  Star  on  top,  which  is  an  Islamic  symbol.  Many  graves  are  built  in  the 

style of a Sufi  saint’s tomb with the  name  and birth and death dates  of the person.  Most 

graves  tell  us  about  the  person  buried  there.  For  example,  during  my travel  in  northern 

regions of Nari'n and Issik-Kol in Kyrgyzstan I saw one very interesting grave, which had

3U/ Ibid. p. 84.

308 Privratsky, p.  50-51

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



2 9 0

a drawing of a hunting scene because the person buried there had been a hunter in his life. 

The Muslim clergy in Kyrgyzstan is also trying to ban these un-Islamic practices.

Conclusion

This  chapter dealt  with  Kyrgyz  traditional  funerary rites  and customs,  which  are 

being condemned as bidd’a, religious innovations by orthodox and purist Muslim clergy. 

I  discussed  and  analyzed in  detail  those key  aspects  of traditional  funeral  without which 

the rite of passage for both the deceased and the relatives would not be complete. There is 

deep  wisdom  and  meaning  that  lay  behind  these  old  and  complex  funeral  customs  and 

practices  which  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs  developed,  adapted,  modified,  and 

refined throughout the past centuries.

Unlike in Islamic/Muslim funeral, which puts  an exclusive focus on the deceased 

and his/her peaceful transition  from this  world to the  other,  the  Kyrgyz,  like many other 

indigenous  cultures,  foster  different  set  of rituals  and  values  both  for  the  dead  and  the 

mourners.  In  other words,  in  Kyrgyz  traditional  society,  a  funeral  is  not just  about  the 

dead, but also about the status of the living, those who are left behind.  As Danforth notes 

correctly,  funeral  rites  is  “the  system  of  death  related  practices  which  overcomes  the 

threat  of  social  paralysis.  Death  rites  are  concrete  procedures  for  the  maintenance  of 

reality  in  the  face  of  death.  Through  the  performance  of these  rituals,  those  who  have 

confronted death are able to resume their reality-sustaining conversation.”309

309 Danforth, M. Loring.  The Death Rituals o f  Rural Greece. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University 

Press,  1982, p. 31.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



291

The  formerly nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakh  took  and  still  take  their funerals  and 

memorial feasts, particularly the ash (Kyrgyz), as (Kazakh) very seriously for they do not 

just  involve  burying  the  dead  but  many  other  social  duties  and  responsibilities  that 

reinforce  the  relationship  between  kinsmen,  clans,  and  tribal  groups.  Funerals  and 

memorial feasts in traditional  Kyrgyz  and Kazakh tribal  society continue to draw quite  a 

large  number  of people  who  come  from  near  and  far  places.  Accommodation  of these 

guests with food and housing for one or two days falls upon the family and tribesmen and 

neighbors  of the  deceased person.  Every Kyrgyz  family keeps  a “record book”  in  which 

they register each guest who brings  “koshumcha,” contribution which is usually given in 

livestock  such  as  a  sheep,  goat,  or  horse.  Nowadays,  most  people  bring  money.  One 

trustworthy man will be assigned to register all the guests’  names and the amount of their 

contribution.  Then,  according  to  that  list,  the  host  must  give  a  soyush,  one  sheep  to  be 

killed  and  served  in  honor  of  those  guests,  who  will  be  assigned  to  the  neighboring 

houses.  At memorial  feasts,  thirty houses will  divide the guests  among themselves.  Each 

house  will  get  one  sheep  and  twelve  people,  because  the  sheep  has  only  twelve jiliks, 

parts to serve.  The  house  of the deceased usually hosts the quda-sooks in-laws,  and very 

close friends who come from far away. This is one of the best aspects of Kyrgyz culture, 

because the burden does not fall onto one family. In other words, as Ibrayev notes “it is a 

social necessity evolving from real life experience and outside of human free will.”

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


292

CHAPTER VI:



Kyrgyz National Ideology: 

Tengirchilik 

Introduction

In the  year  1992,  one  year after the  Soviet collapse,  I became  a first-year student 

at  one  of the  higher  institutions  of learning  in  my  newly  independent  country’s  capital 

city,  Bishkek.  And  I  remember  very  well  when  my  female  teacher,  who  taught  us  a 

course on World Cultures, told us to go to the Philharmonic Concert Hall  and stand next 

to the  big  statue  of the  hero Manas  and the  monuments  of the manaschis,  singers  of the 

epic Manas,  and  write  an  essay  on  the  question  Men  kimmin?  Who Am I?  All  of us  got 

into a trolleybus with pens and notebooks in our hands. After getting off at the bus stop in 

front of the  Concert  Hall,  we  walked up  to  the  statues  of Manas,  his  wife  Kanikey,  and 

his  advisor,  the wise  man Bakay.  At that time,  as  young seventeen year-old students, we 

did not quite understand the objective of this task. We had never been asked that question 

before,  and  we  did not  know  what to  write  in  our essays.  Our teacher had  not  given  us 

any guidance  or suggestions  on  the  topic.  We  were told  to  look  at these  statutes  and  the 

Ala-Too  Mountains,  which  can  be  seen  from  a  distance  at  that  place.  We  learned  later 

that  our teacher wanted us  to  get  inspiration from our national epic Manas  and from the 

snow-capped  mountains.  After  I  came  to  study  in  the  United  States  in  1994,  I  realized 

that our teacher wanted  us  to  know  who  we  were  in  terms  of our  national  identity.  The 

word  “identity”  does  not  exist  in  the  Kyrgyz/Turkic  language,  so  our teacher  expressed 

that idea in the form of the question, Men kimmin?  Who Am I? We were confused and we 

did not know exactly what the purpose of this interesting task was.  So we could not write 

our essay,  and  left  the  place  after  wandering  aimlessly  for  half an  hour  around  the  tall

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



293

statues.  I  realized  later,  we  were  part  of  the  bigger  process  of  national  awakening  or 

identity  formation  that  was  taking  place  in  all  of the  newly  independent  nation  states  at 

that time.

However,  as Islamic  fundamentalism is taking hold among  some  segments of the 

population,  an  alternative  to  a  Kyrgyz  national  ideology  is  being  promoted  by  local 

intellectuals  and  the  Kyrgyz  government.  Many  Kyrgyz  intellectuals,  who  are 

knowledgeable  about  Kyrgyz  oral  tradition  and  nomadic  culture,  do  not  approve  of the 

validity or suitability of Islam or the western form of democracy for Kyrgyz  culture,  but 

search for a national ideology which is already engrained in Kyrgyz culture. They believe 

that  foreign  or  imported  ideology  or  religious  creed  will  destroy  native  worldview  and 

traditional  values.  In  the  opinion  of many  Kyrgyz  scholars  and  intellectuals,  a national 

ideology is  absolutely necessary for the country’s  socio-cultural,  political,  and economic 

development.  It is argued that Kyrgyz  should first of all know their religious and cultural 

history in order to establish their identity.  Knowing their past will help people to develop 

a sense of pride about who they are and respect for their nomadic heritage.  Omiiraliev,  a 

Kyrgyz  writer  and journalist,  quotes  the  Greek philosopher  Socrates:  “Open  your  eyes, 

first  know  who  you  are”310  and  further  elaborates  by  saying:  “One  who  does  not  know 

who he/she is, cannot understand his/her surroundings. If an individual is faced with such

O i l


an  important  question,  what  can  one  say  about  the  whole  nation?” 

A  Kazakh  scholar




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling