Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet29/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   38

  Omuraliev, Choyun.  Tengirchilik (Tengrianity).  Bishkek:  “KRON” Firm,  1994, p. 9.

331


  Op.cit.

332


 Ibid., p. 24.

333


 Ibid., p.  28.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3 0 4

personal,  spiritual,  and  social  lives.  According  to  Omuraliev,  this  ancient  worldview  of 

the ancestors of the nomadic Kyrgyz  has a “universal appeal,”  “for it is not a philosophy

334

of the past, but has the potential to solve modem and future  [global] problems.” 

All the 

“modem  slogans  of  democracy  such  as  ‘Human  Rights  Stand  Above  All’  are  not 

enough’”  and  they  are  just  “empty  declarations”  states  the  author. 

In  his  view, 



Tengirchilik  “is  necessary  [for  the  Kyrgyz]  to  find  their  own  place  in  the  world 

community.”336

The  author  connects  the  ancient  Dao  philosophy  with  the  ancient  Turkic 

worldview  of  Tengirchilik.  The  link  between  the  two  should  not  come  as  a  surprise 

because  for  thousands  of years  the  nomadic  Turks  and  Chinese  closely  interacted  with 

each other.  One should give a lot of credit to the author for his rich knowledge of Kyrgyz 

oral  literature  and  nomadic  culture,  which  he  experienced  while  growing  up  in  the 

mountains.

First of all,  as  many other Central  Asian  advocates  of Tengirchilik,  Omuraliev  is 

against  the  commonly  accepted  term  “shamanism”  or  “totemism”  to  describe  the  old 

Central  Asian  system  of  religious  beliefs.  These  terms,  originally  coined  by  western 

scholars,  are  only partial  aspects  of the  whole  system of beliefs  and practices  of Central 

Asia.  Or,  in  the  author’s  words,  there  were  no  separate  concepts  such  as  “totemism”  or 

“animism”  in  the  understanding  of the  ancient  [Central  Asian]  nomads.  They  only  saw 

the world and its dynamics in the correlation between the “Uchtuk” system and the above

334


 Ibid., p.  11.

335


 Op.cit.

336


 Ibid.,  13.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



305

mentioned  concepts  only  constituted  one  side  of  that  three  dimensional  world.337  This 

view is clearly reflected in the 8th century Kiiltegin Inscription, written in Old Turkic on a 

stele.  It  begins  with  the  following  lines:  “When  the  Blue  Sky  (Kok)  was  created  above 

and when the Brown Earth  (Jer) was created under it,  Human Being  (Kishi) was created 

in  between.”  Even  though  this  famous  line  has  been  a  main  subject  of  scholarly 

discussion since the Inscription was deciphered in  1898 by Thomson,  and later translated 

by  Wilhelm  Radloff  and  others,  it  was  not  studied  comparatively  with  other  religious, 

philosophical  or  cosmological  thoughts,  e.g.  the  ancient  Chinese  philosophical  thinking 

such as Daoism.

In  his  research,  Omuraliev  puts  this  worldview  in  a  context.  Within  this  three-

dimensional  world,  man  occupies  a  special  place  as  a mediator between  Kok  (Sky)  and

Earth  notes  the  author,  and  for  that  very  reason,  argues  the  author,  the  ancestors  of

nomads  [including the  Kyrgyz]  worshipped  the  spirit of the  deceased  as  a protector  and

bringer  of  fortune  or  misfortune  if  they  are  not  remembered  and  offered  periodical

offerings. 

The  author cites  some of the well-known verse lines in the  epic Manas that

are used as traditional epithet for the hero Manas:

Alti'n menen Kiimushtun,

Shiroosiinon biitkondoy,

Ayi'ng menen Kiiniingdiin,

Bir oziinon biitkondoy,

Asman menen Jeringdin 

Tiroosiinon butkondoy...  .

As if He  [Manas] is created 

From the mixture of Gold and Silver,



And as a supporting beam

337


 Ibid., 

p . 

27.

338


 Ibid., 

p .  2 7 .

339


 Ibid., 

p . 

28.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



3 0 6

Between Sky and Earth,

And as if from the very [light]

Of the Moon and the Sun . . .

Omuraliev is correct in asserting that these lines are not just “hyperbolic descriptions or 

exaggerations,” characteristic of many heroic epics like Manas,340 but rather can be 

interpreted as the ancient cosmological view of the Turkic peoples.

The  Kazakh  scholar  Karamanull  explains  the  nature  of  the  religion  of  Tangri, 

which  like  other  world  religions  (Biddhism,  Christianity  and  Islam)  fosters  some  key 

virtues.  It is based on the belief of considering Sky as Father,  and the Earth as Mother.  If 

the  goals  of other  religions  are  to  save  people  from  the  tortures  of the  other  world,  the 

goal of the religion/worldview of Tengir is to lead a better life in this world.341 

What is most interesting about the Omiiraliev’s argument is that he is convinced that the 

philosophy of Tengirchilik is closely related to ancient Chinese philosophies, mainly 

Daoism and Confucianism. The author does not know Chinese, but studied Daoism and 

the origins of Chinese characters through Russian scholarly works.342 He asserts that it 

was not only the nomadic Turks who worshipped Koko Tengir, Blue Sky/Heaven, but 

that their neighbors in the south, the Chinese, also considered the Blue Sky a deity. The 

Turkic word “Kok” or “Tangi” (Sky) is called Tian in Chinese and Ten in Japanese.343

340

 Ibid., 25.

341


  Karamanull, pp..  11-12.

342


 His Russian is excellent.

343


 Omuraliev, Ch., pp.  29-30.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



307

l-c .  1


2a-c.

1 - c .  " B a u iw   -  K e ir r e ,  B y r y  

«J -T a tu m a e u   dejiiu.  2.  Tauimaettt 



cypenu  3.  A jim a u , 

luajibie-KOJidoon,  4.  Kbipetu3  ojOMy.

2-c.  "Bauibi  Hypra  awjiaHraH,  aarbi  TynK©  6aMJiaHraH".

2a-c.  "Yn  KaTMap  Manbi3bma  MaKya  6ojicok  raHa  6yi<6aui 

3jiec  cbipbin  >Kan;ibipaT.  I.Kbipebis  oroMy.  2.  TlempoiAUfp,  Myeyp  CapKOA. 



3.  Ka3aKcmaH,  TaMecuibi

Figure  18:  Ancient symbols representing a three dimensional relationship between Sky, 

Man,  and Earth; Source:  Ch.  Omuraliev,  Tengirchilik, p.26

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



308

In  Kyrgyz  culture everything has its  own way,  which  should be followed to keep 

the  balance  in  the  world.  The  three  major Ways  are  the  Way  of Tengir  (God),  Way  of 

Nature  on  Earth  and  Way  of Man  in  between  the  two.344  As  the  author  notes,  Kyrgyz 

elderly often say: Ee balam,  ar nersenin dzuniin jolu bar,  “Oh, my son, everything has its 

own Way.” He gives many more examples of such expressions that are still being used in 

contemporary Kyrgyz society.

The  author provides  a deep  analysis of Kyrgyz  oral tradition by comparing  some 

aspects  of it  with  ancient  the  Chinese  philosophy  of Daoism.  The  author primarily cites 

from the genre of Kyrgyz philosophical poetry composed by 18th and  19th century Kyrgyz 

oral  poets,  who  sang  about  Nature  (World).  There  is  a  range  of  philosophical  poems 

describing  the  power  of  Nature  in  Kazakh  and  Kyrgyz  oral  poets’  repertoires.  These 

poems are about Akkan Suu (Running/Flowing Water), Duntiyd (World),  Shamal (Wind), 

Ot  (Fire)  about,  Kiln  (Sun)  Adam  (Man)  and  Ajal  (Death).  Later,  with  the  coming  of 

Islam,  poets incorporated many religious views  and ideas of Islam  and thus renewed the 

older themes.  Among these poems,  the  theme  of Akkan  Suu  is  most popular.  Omuraliev 

cites exclusively from this genre of Kyrgyz poetry, particularly the version of Akkan Suu 

of  a  well-known  Kyrgyz  oral  poet  Jengijok  (1860-1916),  who  is  best  known  for  his 

poems  describing  the  dynamics  of the  world  or  life  on  the  Earth  by  comparing  them  to 

“Running  (Flowing)  Water”  {Akkan  Suu).  Ordinary  Kyrgyz  readers  and  even  some 

scholars  of  Kyrgyz  oral  literature  do  not  understand  yet  the  origin  of the  poem  or  the 

poetic genre in general.  Omuraliev,  however,  studies the poem very closely and connects 

it with the ancient wisdom of Daoism, founded by Lao Zi. He quotes Lao Zi, who said:

344

 Ibid., 

p . 

49.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



309

3

8-c.  /.  fla o   uepodJiu
.  Xaicacux. 

i .   KamKcmaH.  4.  Eeunem.  5.  Httdux

Figure  19: The Dao hieroglyphs. Source:  Ch. Omiiraliev,  Tengirchilik, p. 58

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


31 0

‘“Water does  not  differentiate  between  good  and  evil,  it  does  kindness  to  everyone  and 

everything, but does no h arm ... It even flows towards dirty places where no one goes . . .  

The  human  soul  should  be  like  water  .  .  .  Like  water,  the  human  being  will  be 

transformed  into the  state  of Dao  by reaching  a  life  in  which  his  kindness  prevails  over 

his  evil.’” 345  Running  water  was  one  of the  main  allegories  used  to  explain  the  essence 

and dynamics of life in Daoist view for “human beings must know the Law  of Nature in 

order  to  live  in  harmony  with  Nature.”346  The  allegory  of  the  running  water  seems  to 

reflect  the  main  teaching  of Daoism  which  is  emphasizes  the  “non-action”  (wu  wei)  or 

natural  flow  of  things  in  life.  This,  however,  should  not  be  understood  literally,  but 

should be seen as a “paradoxical way of allowing the most effective and perfect action to 

occur.”347  Omuraliev  cites  a  popular  poetic  verse  line  from  Akkan  Suu:  Taza  bolsong 



suuday  bol  baarin juup  ketirgen,  “If  you  want  to  be  pure/clean,  be  like  water,  which 

washes away everything that is dirty.”

The  author also notes  that  Tengirchilik cannot be characterized by Daoism alone. 

Daoism  allows  us  to  understand  one  major  component  of  the  issue. 

To  get  a  fuller 

picture  of  Tengirchilik,  the  author  turns  to  another  ancient  Chinese  philosophy, 

Confucianism.  Omuraliev  mentions  main  virtues  of Confucianism  which  are  necessary 

for human beings to achieve harmony with Tengir. Among the concepts of Confucianism 

the  author  finds  the  virtues  of “Li,”  “ritual  formality  or etiquette’  followed  in  all  social

345


 Ibid., pp. 52-53.

346


 Ibid., p. 53.

347


 Moeller Hans-Georg. Daoism Explained.  From the Dream o f Butterfly to the Fishnet Allegory. Chicago 

and La Salle, Illonois:  Open Court, 2004, p. VII.

348


 Ibid., p. 71.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



311

situations.”349  Another  virtue  is  “Shu,”  which  according  to  Omiiralievs  equals  siy  in 

Kyrgyz  which  implies  “respect”  “mutuality”  between  seniors  and  juniors.  In  Livia 

Kohn’s  explanation:  “The  senior  partner  always  should  treat  the  junior  with  care  and



350

concern,  while  the junior owes  the  senior obedience  and respect” 

The  Kyrgyz  have  a

popular  saying  which  gives  exactly  the  same  idea:  “Uluuga  urmat,  kichiiugo  izat,’

“Respect  for the  elderly  (seniors)  and  care  for  the  young  (juniors).”  The  words  “urmat’

and “izat” come from Persian and Arabic.  However, the  Kazakh and  Kyrgyz also use the

verb  “s'fyla-“  “to  respect”  which  is  one  of  the  most  important  words  in  Kazakh  and

Kyrgyz  vocabulary  in  educating  the  young.  Moreover,  Omuraliev  claims,  that  the  Yin

and Yang philosophy, which is believed to be native to the Chinese, in fact belongs to the

Turkic/Kyrgyz  nomadic  people.  He  studies  the  meaning  and  the  structure  of  Kyrgyz

traditional  ornaments  and  many other sayings  reflecting the  binary opposition  of things,

Yin  and  Yang  in  the  world.351  He  gives  the  following  Kyrgyz  proverbs  and  sayings  as

reflections of Yin and Yang philosophy:

“Uluk bolsong, kichik bol,

Biyik bolsong, japiz bol.”

If you are big (great), be small (modest),

If you are high, be low.

“Uluuga urmat,

Kichiiugo izaat.”

Reverence for the elderly,

Respect for the young.

“Karidan uyat kaytsa,

Jashtan iyman kaytat.”

349


 Kohn, Livia. Daoism and Chinese  Culture. Cambridge, Massachusetts:  Three Pine Press,  2001, p. 13.

350


 Op.cit.

351


  Tengirchilik,  pp. 38-45.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



If the elderly lose their dignity,

The youth looses morality.

“Ashikkan azat,

Toybogon tozot.”

The impatient one becomes exhausted,

The insatiable one becomes weary.

“Bay soyuuga kozu tappay,

Jardi'mn jalgi'z kozusun surapti'r.”

Not finding a lamb to kill (eat),

The rich man asked for the poor man’s only lamb.

“Toonun eki orkochiinun birin kesse 

Birinin kiichii jok,

Eki emcheginin birin kesse,

Birinin stitii jok.”

If you cut one hump off a camel,

The second hump has no strength.

If you cut off one of her teats,

The other one gives no milk.

“Totu kush bashin koriip kubanat,

Butun koriip ardanat.”

When the parrot sees her head, she is happy, 

When she sees her feet, she is ashamed.

“Jalgi'z bolsong chogool bol,

Kop jani'nan tiingiilsiin.

Jard'f bolsong kooz bol,

Bay mali'nan tiingiilsiin.”

If you are an only child, be strong,

So the many lose hope for their life,

If you are poor, be beautiful,

So the rich lose faith in their wealth [livestock].

“Jakas'f jok ton bolboyt,

Jabuusu jok iiy bolboyt.”

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


There can be no coat without a collar, 

There can be no yurt without a [felt] cover.

313

“Jakshi'dan bashchi koysong, el tiizotoor,



Jamandan bashchi koysong, el jiidotoor.”

If you appoint a good person as a leader,

The people will prosper,

If you appoint a bad person as a leader,

The people will diminish.

“Engkeygenge engkeygin

Atangdan kalgan kul emes,  (Siy-principle)

Kakayganga kakayg'in

Paygambardin uulu emes.” 

(Namis-principle)

Be modest to those who are modest to you,

They are not your father’s slaves,  (“principle of respect”)

Be haughty to those who are haughty to you,

They there are not the Prophet’s son. (“principle of honor”)

“Ittin eesi bolso,

Boriiniin Tengiri bar.”

If a dog has a master,

A wolf has Tengir.

“Atkan ok tashtan kaytpayt,

Elchi kandan tilin tartpayt.”

A shot bullet does not return from the rock,

The envoy does not hesitate to criticize the khan.

“Joktun bir armani bar 

Bardin ming armani bar.”352

A poor man has one concern,

A rich man has thousand concerns.

Omuraliev  presents  rich  information  in  his  study  of  Tengirchilik  and  it  is 

impossible  to  address  all  of it  here.  As  he  told  me  during  our  interview,  his  research  is

352

 Ibid., pp.  181-183.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



314

still  in  its  preliminary  stages.  If  he  wants  his  research  findings  on  Tengirchilik  and 

ancient Chinese philosophies to be taken seriously by scholars  and readers in general, he 

needs to learn some Chinese and work in close collaboration with Chinese scholars.

In  sum,  one  finds  striking  similarities  in  the  approach  of  the  Yi  and  Kyrgyz 

intellectuals  in  studying  their history  and  philosophy.  Both  groups  of intellectuals  claim 

that  at  the  root  of  the  Chinese  civilization  lies  the  ancient  Yi  or  Kyrgyz/Turkic 

worldview. These local-nationalistic discourses appeared after the breakup of Communist 

ideological  hegemony  in  China and  post-Soviet  Kyrgyzstan  and the  turn  to  the  “ancient 

roots”  seems  to  be  one  way  in  which  local  intellectuals  react  to  such  a  breakup  of 

hegemony.  According  to  Stevan  Harrell,  one  major  difference  in  the  ultimate  goals  of 

these  native  intellectuals  in  China,  Eastern  Europe,  and  in  Kyrgyzstan  is  that  “Kyrgyz 

have  pride to  restore because  they have  a nation to  unite  and  Islamic  fundamentalism to 

oppose;  while  the  Romanians  and  the  Hungarians  etc.  only  have  pride  to  restore  and  a 

nation  to  unite,  and  the  Yi  only  have  pride  to  restore,  not  a  nation  with  official 

independence  status.”353  In  the  case  of  Kyrgyzstan,  existence  of  the  Tengirchilik 

nationalistic discourse will bring some balance of religious or philosophical views during 

the critical period  of socio-economic transformation after the collapse  of the Communist 

ideology.

353


 Oral  communication,  Seattle, October, 2006.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



Tengirchilik

 Explained by Choyun Omuraliev

315


I met Choyun Omuraliev in the Autumn of 2003  and interviewed him on his ideas

and  research  findings  about  Tengirchilik.  After  graduating  from  the  Kyrgyz  Philology

Department  of the  Kyrgyz  State  University  in  Bishkek  University  in  1973,  Omuraliev

worked  as  a  journalist  for  many  years,  mostly  in  Narin,  northern  Kyrgyzstan.  He

possesses  rich knowledge  of Kyrgyz  oral  literature  and nomadic  culture  for he  met with

many  elderly  Kyrgyz  men  and  gathered  ethnographic  materials  from them.  As  has been

mentioned,  after  the  Soviet  collapse,  like  many  other  intellectuals  in  the  newly

independent  nation  states  of Central  Asia,  Omuraliev  also  experienced  a  major national

awakening;  he  is now  one  of the most prominent  advocates  of Tengirchilik as  a national

ideology. Below I present excerpts from my interview with him:

At  that  time,  the  Russification  process  was  taking  place.354  We  saw  and 

felt that our national  heritage  was  disappearing.  So,  we  thought,  how  can 

we preserve it? This was the main problem at that time. How can this very 

ancient  heritage  perish  so  simply?  This  internal  cry  pushed  me  to  go 

deeper  into  the  history  and  culture  of  our  people.  Therefore,  I  began 

gathering  material.  I  learned  about  Asian  languages  and  philosophies.  I

354

  Here  OmUraliev  is  referring  to  the  unwritten  russification  policy  o f  the  former  Soviet  Union.  Like  in 

many  other  non-Russian  republics  o f the  former  Soviet  Union,  in  1980’s,  before  and  during  perestroika 

years,  the  Kyrgyz  language  was  being  used  less  and  less,  especially  in  major cities  and  towns.  The  capital 

city  of Bishkek only  had one  Kyrgyz  language  school,  because  most Kyrgyz  parents gave  their children  to 

Russian  language  schools  hoping  that  their  children  will  find  jobs  such  as  government  positions  if they 

knew  Russian  fluently.  Most  o f the  school  and  university  textbooks  on  natural  sciences  were published  in 

Russian.  Many  Kyrgyz,  who  came  from  the  countryside  to  study  in  Bishkek,  had  low  self-esteem because 

they  were  embarrassed  for  not  speaking  Russian  or speaking  it  with  a  heavy  accent.  School  children  were 

brainwashed  about  their  history.  Their  history  textbooks  taught  them  that  before  the  Great  October 

Revolution  [of  1917],  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz  were  illiterate  and  lived  an  uncivilized  life  in  the  mountains 

tribes  fighting  with  one  another,  and  only  the  “Dawn  o f  October  Revolution”  brought  the  “light  o f 

civilization” to them. We had to be grateful for our great older brother, Russians and Lenin for saving us.  In 

middle  school,  everybody  had  to  memorize  and  recite  poems  about  Lenin,  Great  October  Revolution  and 

Mother Russia composed by  Kyrgyz poets in Kyrgyz.  One o f the most popular one  is  as follows  in English 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling