Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet39/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   63

CONCLUSIONS:  Unmeasured environmental or genetic factors account for 

ethnic variations in diabetes and central obesity, and deserve further study. 

 

Trop Med Int Health. 2004 Apr;9(4):526-32. 



Assessing  Obesity  and  Overweight  in  a  High  Mountain 

Pakistani Population. 

Shah SM, Nanan D, Rahbar MH, Rahim M, Nowshad G. 

Department of  Community  Health  Sciences, Aga  Khan  University,  Karachi, 

Pakistan. buburdr@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVES:  To estimate the prevalence of obesity and overweight among 

adults  in  a  high  mountain  rural  population  of  Pakistan,  and  to  determine 

the correlates of excess body weight. Design Cross-sectional study. 

METHODS:  A random sample of 4203 adults (aged 18 years and over) was 

selected by stratified random sampling from 16 villages in north Pakistan. 

Trained  medical  students  measured  height,  weight  and  blood  pressure. 

Trained  interviewers  obtained  information  from  participants  on 

sociodemographic  variables,  use  of  snuff,  daily  cigarette  consumption, 

hypertension  and  family  history  of  hypertension.  Body  mass  index  (BMI) 



457 

 

 



calculated  as  kg/m(2)  was  used  to  define  overweight  (BMI  >  or  =  25 

kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)). 



RESULTS:  Using weight and height data available for 1391 men and 2754 

women, mean BMI was 22.4 (95% CI 21.9, 22.9) for men and 22.6 (95% CI 

21.9,  23.2)  for  women.  The  age-adjusted  prevalence  of  BMI  >  or  =  25 

(overweight/obesity)  was  13.5%  for  men  and  14.1%  for  women. 

Overweight/obesity  increased  with  age  and  the  increase  per  year  was 

iden cal for both men and women [adjusted odds ra o (AOR) = 1.01, 95% 

CI 1.01, 1.03]. Overweight/obese men and women were more likely to be 

hypertensive (men, AOR = 3.32, 95% CI 2.16, 5.09; women, AOR = 1.70, 95% 

CI  1.21,  2.39).  Overweight/obese  women  were  more  likely  to  work  in 

business  or  as  skilled  workers  (AOR  =  6.24,  95%  CI  1.18,  32.83)  while 

overweight/obese men were more likely to work as government employees 

(AOR  =  2.59,  95%  CI  1.66,  4.03).  Family  history  of  hypertension  was  a 

significant  correlate  of  overweight/obesity  in  men  (P  value  0.004)  and 

women (P value 0.000). Overweight/obese men and women were less likely 

to  use  smokeless  tobacco  (men,  AOR  =  0.65,  95%  CI  0.43,  0.97;  women, 

AOR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.35, 0.85). 



CONCLUSION:    The  prevalence  of  risk  factors  for  non-communicable 

diseases  (NCDs)  in  Pakistan  is  expected  to  increase  as  further 

epidemiologic, nutritional and demographic changes occur. The assessment 

of excess body weight, and patterns and determinants of other risk factors 

for  NCDs  is  important  to  provide  useful  guidelines  in  the  planning  of 

interventions to counter a growing problem. 

 

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2004 Mar;14(3):189-92. 



Childhood Obesity and Pakistan. 

Afzal MN, Naveed M. 

Department of Basic Health Sciences, Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad. 

nasirafzal@hotmail.com  Erratum  in  J  Coll  Physicians  Surg  Pak.  2004 

May;14(5):326.  

Abstract 

Obesity and overweight have become a problem of public health magnitude 

associated  with  substantial  economic  burden  not  only  in  the  developed 

countries but also in the developing countries. The number of overweight 

children and adolescents has doubled in the last two decades in the United 

States  and  worldwide,  including  developing  countries.  No  study  on 



458 

 

 



childhood  obesity  and  overweight  is  available  in  Pakistan.  Obesity  in 

children  impacts  on  their  health  in  both  short  and  long-term  and  obesity 

and its preventive strategies are poorly understood. Increasing number of 

these  children  and  adolescents  all  over  the  world  demand  not  only  a 

substantial political will but also an investment for primary and secondary 

preventive measures and novel approaches in the treatment modalities. 

 

Journal of Medical Sciences, 2004; 4(1):30-35 



Hypertension  in  Relation  to  Obesity,  Smoking,  Stress, 

Family  History,  Age  and  Marital  Status  among  Human 

Population of Multan, Pakistan 

Kamran  Tassaduqe  ,  Muhammad  Ali  ,  Abdus  Salam  ,  Muhammad  Latif  , 

Nazish Afroze , Samra Masood and Soban Umar  

 Abstract 

The  present  study  was  carried  out  to  assess  hypertension  in  relation  to 

obesity,  smoking  stress,  family  history,  age  and  marital  status  among 

human  population  of  Multan,  Pakistan.  The  present  data  was  collected 

randomly  from  the  male  popula on  aging  from  16  to  85  years.  The  male 

popula on  was  divided  into  three  age  groups  i.e  old  male  (age  above  50 

years),  mature  male  (age  31  to  50  years)  and  young  male  (age  16  to  30 

years).  The  study  revealed  that  there  was  a  strong  relationship  between 

hypertension  and  obesity  in  all  age  groups.  Hypertensive  patients  had 

association  with  age,  smoking,  stress,  family  history  and  marital  status. 

When  comparison  was  made  between  mild,  moderate  and  severe 

hypertensive patients, it was found that old married males were suffering 

from  severe  hypertension.  Family  history  of  hypertension  and  myocardial 

infarction also had a strong association with hypertension. The prevalence 

of hypertension was found to be maximum (17.08%) in males of age group 

>50 as  compared to  mature males  (14.16%) and  young males  (13.48%)  in 

observed  sample  population.  The  results  from  the  observed  population 

suggested  that  prevalence  of  obesity  was  (11.49%).  The  obesity  was 

maximum  (12.19%)  in  males  of  age  group  >50  as  compared  to  mature 

males (11.51%) and young males (10.64%). In the normotensive individuals 

the  prevalence  of  obesity  was  (8.74%)  as  compared  to  (26.99%)  in 

hypertensive individuals. 

 

 


459 

 

 



JPMA (Journal Of Pakistan Medical Association), July 2003;53(7) 

Obesity in Adolescents of Pakistan 

T. Rehman, Z. Rizvi, U. Siddiqui, S Ahmad, A. Sophie, M. Siddiqui, O. Saeed, 

Q. Kizilbash, A. Shaikh , A. Lakhani, A. Shakoor.  

Final  Year  Medical  Students,  The  Aga  Khan  University  Medical  College, 

Karachi. 

Abstract  

OBJECTIVES:  To  elucidate  the  knowledge,  attitudes  and  practices  of 

Karachi's school going teenagers regarding healthy eating and body weight 

and to  determine  the  extent  of  obesity  in  these  individuals  by  measuring 

their Body Mass Index (BMI). 



SETTING: Tenth grade O' level students from six schools in Karachi. 

METHOD:    A  cross  sectional  study  design  with  a  convenience  sample  of 

students  who  were  provided  with  a  self-administered  questionnaire.  In 

order  to  compute  BMI,  the  height  and  weight  of  each  student  was 

measured after completion of the questionnaire. 



RESULTS:    Seventeen  percent  students  were  underweight  (below  the  5th 

percen le), 65% were normal weight (5th to 85th percen le) and 18% were 

overweight (above the 85th percentile). Regarding knowledge about health 

problems arising due to being overweight, 90% knew being overweight was 

harmful to health. When asked about what one can do to lose weight, 96% 

listed  exercise  among  their  answers.  The  results  also  showed  that 

underweight  people  were  more  likely  to  have  1  or  more  snacks  daily, 

whereas overweight respondents were less likely to snack between meals. 

(OR 0.2, p-value <0.01). 

CONCLUSION:    Given  the  prevalence  of  overweight  individuals,  it  is 

important that work be done with regard to tackling this health issue, which 

is  of  significant  consequence  in  the  long  term.  Emphasis  should  be  on 

promoting  low  intensity  long  duration  physical  activity  that  can  be 

conveniently  incorporated  into  daily  life.  There  is  a  need  for  more  based 

studies  be  conducted  in  schools  and  in  the  general  population  so  as  to 

establish guidelines on nutrition and weight status for the Pakistani people 

(JPMA 53:315;2003). 

 

 


460 

 

 



J Pak Med Assoc. 2002 Aug;52(8):342-6. 

The Obesity Pandemic--Implications for Pakistan. 

Nanan DJ. 

Department of Community Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Karachi. 

Abstract 

BACKGROUND:   Adverse health outcomes are associated with overweight 

and  obesity.  In  February  2000,  the  WHO  Regional  Office  for  the  Western 

Pacific,  the  International  Association  for  the  Study  of  Obesity  and  the 

International  Obesity  Task  Force  published  provisional  recommendations 

for adults for the Asia-Pacific region: overweight at Body Mass Index (BMI) 

> or = 23 and obesity at BMI > or = 25. 



METHODS:    Data  from  the  National  Health  Survey  of  Pakistan,  1990-94 

were  reanalyzed  using  BMI  cut-offs  recommended  for  Asians  to  reassess 

prevalence of overweight and obesity in the adult Pakistani population. 

RESULTS:  Prevalence of obesity (BMI > or = 25) in 25-44 year olds in rural 

areas was 9% for men and 14% for women; in urban areas, prevalence was 

22%  and  37%  for  men  and  women,  respec vely.  For  45-64  year  olds, 

prevalence was 11% for men and 19% for women in rural areas, and 23% 

and  40%  in  urban  areas  for  men  and  women,  respec vely.  Obesity 

prevalence was directly associated with SES, regardless of residence. 



CONCLUSION:  In South Asia, including Pakistan, social and environmental 

changes  are  occurring  rapidly,  with  increasing  urbanization,  changing 

lifestyles, higher energy density of diets, and reduced physical activity. The 

coexistence of underweight in early life with obesity in adults may presage 

both  a  higher  prevalence  and  incidence  for  noncommunicable  diseases 

(NCDs)  such  as  hypertension  and  diabetes.  Use  of  BMI  >  or  =  23  for 

overweight,  and  BMI  >  or  =  25  for  obesity,  may  provide  a  more  accurate 

determination  of  the  health  of  Pakistanis,  especially  in  those  with  more 

than one risk factor for NCDs. 

 

 



461 

 

 



Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 May;55(5):400-6. 

Socio-Economic  Differences  in  Height  and  Body  Mass 

Index  of  Children  and  Adults  Living  In  Urban  Areas  of 

Karachi, Pakistan. 

Hakeem R. 

Department  of  Food  and  Nutrition,  Rana  Liaqat  Ali  Khan  Government 

College 


of 

Home 


Economics, 

Karachi, 

Pakistan. 

hakeem@cyberaccess.com.pk 

 

Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  study  the  socio-economic  differences  in  height  and  body 

mass index (BMI) in urban areas of Karachi. 



DESIGN:  A comparative study was undertaken to compare the heights and 

BMIs  of  adults  and  children  belonging  to  three  distinctively  different 

income groups living in urban areas of Karachi. 

SETTING:    Data  was  collected  from  families  living  in  small,  medium  and 

large houses located in the authorised urban residential areas of Karachi. 



SUBJECTS:    A  total  of  600  families,  200  from  each  income  group,  were 

included in the study. Anthropometric measurements of 1296 females and 

1197 males of different ages were taken. 

METHODS:    All  the  housewives  were  interviewed  to  collect  socio-

demographic  information.  Height  and  weight  of  all  the  available  family 

members  were  measured.  In  order  to  determine  the  socio-economic 

difference in height status, the mean height in cm of adults was compared. 

For children  (2-17  y)  means  of height-for-age  Z-scores  determined  on  the 

basis  of  NCHS  reference  values  were  compared.  For  studying  the  weight 

status  the  BMI  of  all  the  respondents  was  calculated  and  they  were 

grouped into categories of under-, normal or overweight according to  the 

NCHS recommended cut-off points. For adult men and women BMI values 

<18.5  kg/m(2)  indicated  underweight  and  >25  kg/m(2)  indicated 

overweight.  Among  children,  those  having  BMI  values  below  the  5th 

percentile  of  the  NHANES  III  reference  values  were  categorised  as 

underweight and those above the 95th percen le were termed overweight. 

 


462 

 

 



RESULTS:    Height  status  improved  with  income  level  among  adults  and 

children  of  both  sexes.  Among  males  the  difference  in  weight  status  was 

significant  only  among  2  to  18-y-olds  (P<0.05  in  each  case).  The  rate  of 

overweight among 2 to 18-y-old males was significantly higher (P=0.004) at 

the middle-income level (15%) as compared to low or high income. The rate 

of underweight was significantly higher  (P=0.025) at the low-income  level 

among 2 to 18-y-old males (31%, 21% and 22% at low-, middle-  and high-

income levels, respectively). Among females, rates of underweight were not 

significantly different at any age. Rates of overweight increased significantly 

(P=0.048) with income level among 41 to 60-y-old women (38%, 53%  and 

60% at low-, middle- and high-income levels, respectively). 

CONCLUSION:    Chronic  undernutrition  as  indicated  by  deficit  in  height 

decreased  with  increasing  income  level.  Socio-economic  differences  in 

weight  status  were  not  uniform  among  various  age-sex  groups.  The 

influence  of  increasing  affluence  is  likely  to  be  seen  both  in  the  form  of 

increased obesity  among older  females and  underweight among  children. 

Differing patterns of association between income and weight status among 

male and female children need to studied further with more accurate birth 

records,  so  as  to  further  clarify  the  situation.  In  terms  of  prevention  of 

nutrition-related  disorders  both  problems  of  under-  and  over-nutrition 

need to be addressed. 

 

Health Phys. 2001 Mar;80(3):274-7. 



Evaluation  of  Body  Mass  Index  for  a  Reference  Pakistani 

Man and Woman. 

Akhter P, Aslam M, Orfi SD. 

Health  Physics  Division,  Pakistan  Institute  of  Nuclear  Science  and 

Technology, Islamabad. akhterp@apollo.net.pk 



Abstract 

To  strengthen  the  radiation  protection  infrastructure,  a  pilot  study  on 

physical  characteristics  for  Reference  Asian  Man  was  carried  out  in 

Pakistan. Physical data on height and weight of Pakistani men and women 

were  collected  and  compiled  for  all  age  groups  to  establish  a  Reference 

Pakistani  Man/Woman  which  contributed  toward  the  Reference  Asian 

Man/Woman.  A  correlation  between  Age  and  Body  Mass  Index  (BMI)  of 

Pakistani  MALES  (i.e.,  rm  =  +0.89)  and  FEMALES  (i.e.,  rf  =  +0.71)  was 

observed. Average BMI of Pakistani males and females for the age group of 


463 

 

 



20-50 y  was  found  to be  21.95  kg  m(-2) and  21.20  kg  m(-2),  respec vely. 

From  recent  literature  and  work  of  others  BMI  for  Reference  Asian  Male 

(RAM) and Reference Asian Female (RAF) has been found to be 20.79 kg m(-

2)  and  20.81  kg  m(-2).  Results  of  our  study  fall  within  BMI  ranges  for 

male/female adults of Asian countries, i.e., 19.14-22.98 kg m(-2) and 19.38-

22.71 kg m(-2), respec vely. However, no significant sex specific difference 

has been noted. 

 

 



 

 

 



464 

 

 



Palestine 

I

nt J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003 Jan;27(1):140-6. 



Obesity  in  a  Rural  and  an  Urban  Palestinian  West  Bank 

Population. 

Abdul-Rahim  HF,  Holmboe-Ottesen  G,  Stene  LC,  Husseini  A,  Giacaman  R, 

Jervell J, Bjertness E. 

Institute  of  Community  and  Public  Health,  Birzeit  University,  West  Bank, 

Palestinian Authority. hhalabi@birzeit.edu 

Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:    To  compare  the  prevalence  of  obesity,  household  food 

consumption  patterns,  physical  activity  patterns  and  smoking  between  a 

rural and an urban community in the Palestinian West Bank and to describe 

the associations of the latter factors with body mass index (BMI). 



DESIGN:  A population-based cross-sectional survey in a rural and an urban 

Palestinian West Bank community. 



SUBJECTS:    A  total  of  549  women  and  387  men  aged  30-65  y,  excluding 

pregnant women. 

MEASUREMENTS:  Obesity was defined as BMI >/=30 kg/m(2). 

RESULTS:   The  prevalence of  obesity  was 36.8  and  18.1% in  rural  women 

and men, respectively, compared with 49.1 and 30.6% in urban women and 

men,  respec vely.  The  mean  difference  (s.e)  in  BMI  levels  was  1.6  (0.52) 

kg/m(2) between urban and rural women and 0.9 (0.46) kg/m(2) in men. At 

the household level, the mean energy consump on from 25 selected food 

items  was  13.8  MJ  (3310  kcal)/consump on  unit/day  in  the  rural 

community compared to 14.5 MJ (3474 kcal)/consump on unit/day in the 

urban community (P=0.021). BMI was posi vely associated with age in both 

men and women and with urban residence in women. BMI was negatively 

associated with smoking and physical activity in men and with educational 

level in women. 

CONCLUSION:    BMI  was  associated  with  urban  residence  in  women  after 

adjusting for age, smoking, education, physical activity and nutrition-related 

variables, suggesting that the differences in the conventional determinants 

of obesity could not fully explain the difference in the prevalence of obesity 

between  the  two  communities.  Among  men,  the  measured  determinants 

explained the rural-urban differences in BMI 



465 

 

 



QATAR 

Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2011 Feb;62(1):60-2. Epub 2010 Jul 21. 



Obesity  and  Low  Vision  as  a  Result  of  Excessive  Internet 

Use and Television Viewing. 

Bener A, Al-Mahdi HS, Ali AI, Al-Nufal M, Vachhani PJ, Tewfik I. 

Department  of  Medical  Statistics  &  Epidemiology,  Hamad  Medical 

Corporation, Hamad General Hospital, Qatar. abener@hmc.org.qa 



Abstract 

The technological age has resulted in children spending prolonged hours in 

front of television (TV) and computer screens (on the Internet). The aim of 

this  prospective  cross-sectional  study  is  to  determine  the  effect  of  this 

phenomenon  on  both  childhood  obesity  and  low  vision  in  the  State  of 

Qatar. A total of 3000 school students aged 6 to 18 years were approached 

from September 2009 to March 2010 and 2467 (82.2%) students agreed to 

participate.  Face-to-face  interviews  based  on  a  designed  questionnaire 

were  conducted.  The  highest  proportion  of  obese  children  were  aged 

between  15-18  years  (9.4%;  p  <  0.001);  spent  ≥  3  hours  on  the  Internet 

(5.6%; p < 0.001), and spent between 5-7 hours or less sleeping (4.1%; p < 

0.001). Forty-six  (1.9%) children  spent  ≥ 3  hours/day  on the  Internet,  and 

were  either  overweight/obese  and  had  low  vision.  The  study  findings 

confirmed a positive association between obesity and low vision as a result 

of excessive time spent on the TV view and Internet use. 

 

Qatar Founda on Annual Research Forum Proceedings, 2010 



Developing a Childhood Obesity Prevention Program for 

Children in the State of Qatar. 

Amal Essa Al-Muraikhi, Hamad Medical Corporation, Primary Health Care, 

Doha, Qatar.

 

Abstract  

PURPOSE:  Obesity  has  been  recognized  as a  major  public  health  problem 

worldwide  that  requires  preventive  action.  Prevention  is  best  targeted  at 

children,  but  relatively  few  research  studies  have  focused  on  obesity 

prevention and most of those were conducted in western countries. Qatar 

has undergone rapid industrialization and childhood obesity is emerging as 


466 

 

 



a health problem. However, there is little information on the determinants 

and its prevention. The aims of this study was to describe the prevalence of 

obesity  among  6-7  years  old  school  children,  inves gate  contribu ng 

factors  and  identify  potential  components  for  an  intervention  program  to 

prevent obesity amongst children.  

METHODS:  The  study  consisted  of  two  parts:  1)  cross-sectional  survey  of 

children  in  grade  1  from  12  primary  schools  randomly  selected  from  the 

state  of  Qatar  and  2)  focus  groups  with  a  range  of  stakeholders.  Topic 

guides  were  used  to  explore  concepts  on  overweight  and  obesity,  the 

causes  of  childhood  obesity,  and  perceptions  on  potential  prevention 

interventions.  




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling