Overweight and Obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region


Download 5.37 Mb.

bet50/63
Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi5.37 Mb.
1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   63

Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To examine the trends in body mass index (BMI) of Saudi male 

adolescents between 1988 and 1996. 



METHODS:    The  data  set  came  from  three  major  population-based  cross 

sectional  studies.  They  all  involve  nationally  representative  samples  and 

were  conducted  between  1988  and  1996.  BMI  was  calculated  from  body 

height and mass and plo ed at the 50(th) and 90(th) percen les. 



RESULTS:  BMI of Saudi adolescents progressively increased at both 50(th) 

and 90(th) percen les between 1988 and 1996. The increases in BMI during 

the eight-year  period  ranged  from  9.6  to 10.8%  at  the  50  (th)  percen les 

and  from  10.9  to  13.9%  at  the  90th  percen les.  At  ages  15-18  years,  the 

yearly increase in median BMI from 1988 to 1996 averaged 0.246 kg/m(2). 

CONCLUSION:    The  rising  trends  in  BMI  between  1988  and  1996  are 

indication  of  increasing  obesity  among  Saudi  male  adolescents.  More 

attention  to  the  promotion  of  healthy  nutrition  and  physical  activity 

throughout childhood and adolescence is required. 



562 

 

 



Saudi 

Medical 


Journal, 

Riyadh, 


ARABIE 

SAOUDITE  

(Revue), 

2007, 28(12);1875-1880 [6 page(s) (ar cle)] (37 ref.) 



The  Prevalence  of  Abdominal  Obesity  and  Its  Associated 

Risk  Factors  in  Married,  Non-Pregnant  Women  Born  and 

Living in High Altitude, Southwestern, Saudi Arabia 

KHALID Mohammed E.  

Department  of  Physiology,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Khalid  University, 

Abba, ARABIE SAOUDITE 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVES:    To  determine  the  prevalence  of  abdominal  obesity  and  its 

associated  risk  factors  in  a  married,  non-pregnant,  high  altitude  female 

population.  Methods:  A  cross-sectional  study  conducted  from  January  to 

March 2003, with 438 currently married non-pregnant women aged 18-60 

years,  born  and  permanent  residents  in  and  around  Abha,  southwestern 

heights,  Kingdom  of  Saudi  Arabia.  A  questionnaire  describing  the 

demographic, social, reproductive, physical activity, and educational status 

was completed. The subjects were measured by weight, height, and waist 

circumference (WC). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each woman 

(BMI=weight  [Kg]/height  [m

2

]).  Abdominal  obesity  was  defined  as 



WC>88cm,  and  total  obesity  as  BMI≥30  according  to  the  World  Health 

Organization criteria. Results: The overall prevalence of abdominal obesity 

was 41.1 %. The prevalence was posi vely and significantly associated with 

age, total obesity, and parity (p=0.0001 for all), nega vely and significantly 

with  educa onal  level  (p=0.0001),  and  nega vely  and  insignificantly  with 

strenuous  physical  ac vity  (p=0.9).  Results  of  mul ple  logis c  analyses 

showed that age, total obesity, and educational level were independent risk 

factors for abdominal obesity. 



CONCLUSION:  The  study  highlighted  the  high  prevalence  of  abdominal 

obesity  and  showed  that  in  addition  to  total  obesity,  intra-abdominal  fat 

deposition  is  influenced  by  other  lifestyle  and  reproductive  factors. 

Community health education programs, which provide information on the 

high prevalence of abdominal obesity and its risk factor to all women, will 

be  certainly  justifiable,  and  prevention  strategies  should  be  implemented 

accordingly. 

 

 


563 

 

 



Anaesth Intensive Care. 2006 Oct;34(5):629-33. 

Association  of  Obesity  with  Increased  Mortality  in  the 

Critically Ill Patient. 

Aldawood A, Arabi Y, Dabbagh O. 

Department of Intensive Care, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom 

of Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

The  impact  of  obesity  on  critical  care  outcomes  has  been  an  issue  for 

debate  in  the  literature.  Variable  data  and  conflicting  results  have  been 

reported. The purpose of our study is to examine the impact of obesity on 

the outcome  of patients  admitted  to a  tertiary  closed Intensive  Care  Unit 

(ICU)  in  Saudi  Arabia.  Data  was  obtained  from  a  prospectively  collected 

database  from  September  2001  to  May  2004.  Pa ents  younger  than  18, 

those with burns, brain death and readmissions were excluded. The study 

population was stratified into six groups according to their Body Mass Index 

(BMI).  Primary  endpoints  were  ICU  and  hospital  mortality,  duration  of 

mechanical ven la on and ICU length of stay. A total of 1835 pa ents were 

included in the analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar among the six 

groups  including  severity  of  illness  scores,  reflected  by  Acute  Physiology 

and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The ICU mortality was 

not statistically different among the groups. Hospital mortality was lower in 

pa ents  with  BMI  35-39.9  kg/m2  and  BMI  >40  kg/m2  compared  to  those 

with  BMI  18.5-24.9  kg/m2.  Mul variate  analysis  showed  that  a  BMI  >40 

kg/m2 was an independent predictor of lower hospital mortality (odds ratio 

0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.92, P 0.025) a er adjustment for other 

confounding factors. In conclusion, mortality of obese critically ill patients 

was  not  higher  than  patients  with  normal  weight.  In  fact,  the  hospital 

mortality  was  lower  for  pa ents  with  BMI  >40  kg/m2  compared  to  the 

normal BMI group despite similar severity of illness. Obesity might have a 

protective effect, although further studies are needed to substantiate  this 

finding. 


564 

 

 



Ann Saudi Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;26(4):288-95. 

Emerging  Global  Epidemic  of  Obesity:  The  Renal 

Perspective. 

Saxena AK. 

Postgraduate Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, King Fahad 

Hospital  and  Tertiary  Care  Center,  Al-  Hasa,  Saudi  Arabia. 

dranil_31982@yahoo.com 

Abstract 

Obesity, as a core component of the metabolic syndrome, is among the top 

ten global health risks classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as 

being strongly associated with the development and progression of chronic 

renal disease--a widely prevalent but often silent condition. Obesity carries 

elevated risks of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality besides having an 

array  of  metabolic  complications.  Maladaptive  glomerular  hemodynamics 

with  increased  intraglomerular  pressure  in  association  with  vasoactive, 

fibrogenic  substances  released  from  adipocytes,  in  addition  to  cytokines 

and hormones, are the key factors in the causation of renal injury and the 

progression of nephron loss among obese subjects. 

 

Ann Saudi Med. 2006 Mar-Apr;26(2):110-5. 



Correlation  of  Leptin  and  Sex  Hormones  with  Endocrine 

Changes  in  Healthy  Saudi  Women  of  Different  Body 

Weights. 

Al-Harithy RN, Al-Doghaither H, Abualnaja K. 

Department  of  Biochemistry,  King  Abdulaziz  University,  Jeddah,  Saudi 

Arabia. ralharithy@yahoo.com 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:    A  relationship  between  estrogen  and  leptin  has  been 

described during the follicular phase of both spontaneous menstrual cycles 

and  cycles  stimulated  with  exogenous  follicle-stimulating  hormone  (FSH), 

which  suggest  that  leptin  has  either  a  direct  effect  on  or  is  regulated  by 

gonadal  steroids  in  the  human  ovary.  To  examine  the  changes  in  plasma 

leptin  levels  during  the  menstrual  cycle,  we  studied  the  association 

between plasma leptin and reproductive hormones in young, healthy Saudi 

women. 


565 

 

 



SUBJECTS AND METHODS:  Sixty-five young women between 19 to 39 years 

of  age,  with  a  normal  menstrual  cycle,  were  grouped  into  33  overweight 

and  obese  females  of  BMI  >25  kg/m2,  and  32  lean  females  of  BMI  <25 

kg/m2.  Anthropometrics  measurements  were  made  at  the  me  of  the 

collec on. Samples  were analyzed  for lep n,  progesterone, estradiol  (E2), 

FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), cortisol, and testosterone concentrations. 



RESULTS:  Overweight  and  obese women, compared  with lean, tended  to 

have a significantly higher plasma leptin levels (11.38 +/-  4.06 vs. 6.22 +/- 

2.87  ng/mL;  P=0.05).  In  overweight  and  obese  subjects,  circulating  leptin 

concentra ons showed a directcorrela on with BMI (r=0.53; P=0.002), hip 

circumference  (r=0.32;  P=0.005),  waist-hip  ra o  (r=0.37;  P=0.042),  weight 

(r=0.41;  P=0.021),  and  E2  on  day  3  (r=0.35;  P=0.048).  In  all  correla on 

analyses, leptin levels did not correlate with cortisol or testosterone. In lean 

subjects,  a  bivariate  correlation  analysis  showed  that  plasma  leptin 

concentrations  were  directly  correlated  to  hip  circumference  (r=0.43; 

P=0.012). Moreover,  a  direct  correla on was  found  with  progesterone  on 

day 10 (r=0.43; P=0.014) and E2 on day 24 (r=0.47; P=0.007). 

CONCLUSION:    There  is  a  link  between  plasma  leptin  and  progesterone 

concentrations during the menstrual cycle, and the variation in circulating 

estradiol  concentrations  may  have  an  influence  on  circulating  leptin  in 

female subjects. 

 

MedGenMed. 2006 Mar 1;8(1):58. 



Obesity  and  Its  Correlation  with  Spirometric  Variables  in 

Patients With Asthma. 

Ghabashi AE, Iqbal M. 

Pulmonary  and  Critical  Care,  King  Abdulaziz  National  Guard  Hospital, 

Alhasa, Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

BACKGROUND:  The severity of bronchial asthma has been associated with 

increased body mass index (BMI) in several studies. We studied obesity  in 

the  asthmatic  population  and  its  possible  correlation  with  spirometric 

variables. 



METHODS:    We  reviewed  the  medical  records  of  200  pa ents  who 

underwent  spirometry  and  were  followed  up  in  a  pulmonary  clinic  for 

asthma. Ninety patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients were divided 

into  Group?  (forced  expiratory  volume  in  1  second  [FEV1]  =  80%,  n  =  64) 



566 

 

 



and  Group  II  (FEV1  60%  to  79%,  n  =  26).  Pa ents  with  BMI  =  30  were 

labeled  as  obese.  In  each  group,  correlates  of  BMI  and  forced  expiratory 

flow,  midexpiratory  phase  (FEF25%-75%)  were  analyzed  with  linear 

regression. 



RESULTS:  The mean ages were 33.9 -/+ 13 years and 33.73 -/+ 10 years in 

Groups  I  and  II,  respec vely.  The  mean  BMI  was  30.2  +/  6  (Group  I)  and 

30.36 -/+ 6 (Group II). BMI = 30 was seen in 56.7% of pa ents in Group I and 

53.3% in Group II. BMI did not correlate with spirometric variables in both 

groups.  FEF25%-75%  correlated  with  FEV1  and  FEV1:forced  vital  capacity 

(FVC) in Group I (P = .003 and .0001, respec vely) and FEV1:FVC in Group II 

(P = .0001). In Group 1, 38% of the pa ents had FEF25%-75% less than 80%. 

CONCLUSION:  Although obesity  was prevalent in asthmatic patients, BMI 

did not correlate with any of the spirometric variables. A significant number 

of pa ents with normal FEV1 had impaired midflow rates that may reflect 

ongoing small airway inflammation. 

 

West Afr J Med. 2006 Jan-Mar;25(1):42-51. 



Standards of Growth and Obesity for Saudi Children (Aged 

3 -18 Years) Living at High Al tudes. 

Al-Shehri MA, Mostafa OA, Al-Gelban K, Hamdi A, Almbarki M, Altrabolsi H, 

Luke N. 

Department  of  Child  Health,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Khalid  University, 

Abha, Saudi Arabia. Fariss2000@yahoo.com 

Abstract 

AIM OF STUDY:   To standardize the growth parameters for Saudi  children 

aged  3-18  years  living  at  high  al tude  and  to  inves gate  the 

appropriateness  of  using  the  National  Center  for  Ilealth  Statistics  (NC(IIS) 

growth  standards  for  the  assessment  of  children's  growth  at  this  high 

attitude area. 

SUBJECTS  AND  METHODS:    The  present  study  follows  a  cross-sectional 

study design. A total of 13,580 na ve Saudi children (7,193 boys and 6,387 

girls) aged 3-18 years living in Abha City (Eleva on: 3,100 meters above sea 

level) constituted the study's sample. All chronically and acutely ill children 

were  excluded.  The  data  regarding  the  children  were  obtained  from  the 

well-baby  clinics  at  primary  health  care  centers  and  nurseries,  as  well  as 

primary,  intermediate  and  secondary  schools.  The  percentiles  for  the 

weight  and  height  and  the  body  mass  index  (BMI)  were  calculated 



567 

 

 



separately for  the  boys  and  the  girls  using  one-year  intervals.  BMI  values 

above  the  95th  and  below  the  5th  percen les  were  considered  as 

diagnostic for obesity and underweight, respectively. 

RESULTS:    Median  values  of  weight  and  height  for  Saudi's  children  (both 

boys and girls)  were lower than their corresponding values for children in 

the  USA.  Median  values  of  the  BMI  for  the  Saudi's  boys  were  almost 

identical to  those  of  the USA's  NCHS  median  values through  all  ages  that 

were  studied.  On  the  other  hand,  the  median  values  for  the  BMI  were 

almost  identical  for  the  Saudi's  and  USA's  girls  aged  3-9  years.  However, 

a er the  age of  9 years  the differences  in the  median values  for the  BMI 

were increased progressively due to the higher values for the Saudi's girls. 



CONCLUSIONS:  The use of the NCHS growth standards is not appropriate 

for the assessment of growth of children that live in the high altitude area 

of Abha and further  studies are needed to  determine the exact impact  of 

high altitude on the growth patterns in children. 

 

Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2006 Fall;4(3):204-14. 



AComparison of the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in 

Saudi Adult Females Using Two Definitions. 

Al-Qahtani DA, Imtiaz ML, Saad OS, Hussein NM. 

Primary Care Physicians, Department of Primary Health Care, Northern Area 

Armed Forces Hospital, King Khalid Military City, Hafr Al-Batin, Saudi Arabia. 



Abstract 

The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  estimate  the  prevalence  of  metabolic 

syndrome in Saudi adult women aged 18 years and above using the criteria 

of  International  Diabetes  Federation  (IDF)  and  modified  National 

Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (mNCEPATPIII). A 

cross-sec onal  survey  was  performed  involving  a  group  of  2577  non-

pregnant Saudi women subjects aged 18-59 years residing in a military city 

in  northern  Saudi  Arabia  recruited  from  a  primary  care  setting. 

Anthropometric data, together with a brief medical history, were obtained 

at  initial  contact,  and  laboratory  investigations  were  performed  on  the 

following day a er fas ng for 12 h. Data on all variables required to define 

the metabolic  syndrome  according  to IDF  and  mNCEP-ATPIII  criteria  were 

available  for  only  1922  subjects  who  a ended  the  laboratory  for 

inves ga ons  (response  rate  of  74.6%).  Non-respondents  were  excluded 

from  data  analysis.  Prevalence  rates  were  estimated  according  to  both 


568 

 

 



definitions. Age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was found to 

be  16.1%  and  13.6%  by  IDF  and  mNCEP-ATPIII  definitions,  respectively. 

Abdominal  obesity  was  the  most  common  component  in  the  study 

popula on (44.1% by mNCEP-ATPIII and 67.9% by IDF cut-off points). It was 

followed by low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (36.0%). About 

two-thirds  of  the  subjects  (66.4%  by  mNCEP-ATPIII  and  67.9%  by  IDF 

definitions) exhibited at least one criterion for metabolic syndrome by both 

definitions.  Mean  values  and  prevalence  of  individual  components  of  the 

syndrome showed a steady rise with increase in age, general and abdominal 

obesity,  and  the  presence  of  diabetes.  Since  the  cut-off  values  for  waist 

circumference  by  IDF  definition  were  lower,  prevalence  rates  by  this 

definition  were  higher  than  those  defined  by  mNCEP-ATPIII.  High 

prevalence rates in this young sample predict a sharp rise in the prevalence 

rates of this syndrome among Saudi women over the next few years. 

 

Saudi Med J. 2006 Nov;27(11):1742-4. 



Osteoarthritis  of  Knees  and  Obesity  in  Eastern  Saudi 

Arabia. 

Ismail AI, Al-Abdulwahab AH, Al-Mulhim AS. 

Department  of  Physical  Therapy,  King  Fahad  Hofuf  Hospital,  Hofuf  31982, 

PO Box 2052, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. abdullahisim@hotmail.com 



Abstract 

OBJECTIVE:  To find out the prevalence and relation between osteoarthritis 

of knees and obesity in Al-Ahsa region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). 



METHODS:    The  study  included  243  male  and  female  pa ents  diagnosed 

with osteoarthri s of knees between June 2001 to March 2003. All pa ents 

were  recruited  from  the  Physical  Therapy  Department,  King  Fahd  Hofuf 

Hospital, Hofuf, KSA. The clinical diagnosis was supported by plain x-rays of 

knees, and  of  other joint  if  needed. The  weight  and height  of  all  patients 

were  taken  using  one  standard  weight  and  height  scale,  and  body  mass 

index was also calculated and recorded. 

RESULTS:  More than 90.53% of the pa ents referred with osteoarthritis of 

the knees were obese or overweight. The mean body weight of all patients 

was 84.61 kg  and the mean  height was 1.59  meters. Osteoarthri s of  the 

knees was more common in obese female than male patients with a female 

to male ra o of 2.37:1. 


569 

 

 



CONCLUSION:  Obesity is a disease. The aim of all health professionals and 

others  in  the  community  should  be  directed  to  the  prevention  of  this 

disease and its risk to develop multiple complications. 

West Afr J Med. 2006 Jan-Mar;25(1):42-51. 



Standards of Growth and Obesity for Saudi Children (Aged 

3 -18 Years) Living at High Al tudes. 

Al-Shehri MA, Mostafa OA, Al-Gelban K, Hamdi A, Almbarki M, Altrabolsi H, 

Luke N. 

Department  of  Child  Health,  College  of  Medicine,  King  Khalid  University, 

Abha, Saudi Arabia. Fariss2000@yahoo.com 

Abstract 

AIM OF STUDY:   To standardize the growth parameters for Saudi children 

aged  3-18  years  living  at  high  al tude  and  to  inves gate  the 

appropriateness  of  using  the  National  Center  for  Ilealth  Statistics  (NC(IIS) 

growth  standards  for  the  assessment  of  children's  growth  at  this  high 

attitude area. 

SUBJECTS  AND  METHODS:    The  present  study  follows  a  cross-sectional 

study design. A total of 13,580 na ve Saudi children (7,193 boys and 6,387 

girls) aged 3-18 years living in Abha City (Eleva on: 3,100 meters above sea 

level) constituted the study's sample. All chronically and acutely ill children 

were  excluded.  The  data  regarding  the  children  were  obtained  from  the 

well-baby  clinics  at  primary  health  care  centers  and  nurseries,  as  well  as 

primary,  intermediate  and  secondary  schools.  The  percentiles  for  the 

weight  and  height  and  the  body  mass  index  (BMI)  were  calculated 

separately for  the  boys  and  the  girls  using  one-year  intervals.  BMI  values 

above  the  95th  and  below  the  5th  percen les  were  considered  as 

diagnostic for obesity and underweight, respectively. 

RESULTS:    Median  values  of  weight  and  height  for  Saudi's  children  (both 

boys and girls) were lower than their corresponding values for children in 

the  USA.  Median  values  of  the  BMI  for  the  Saudi's  boys  were  almost 

identical to  those  of  the  USA's  NCHS  median  values through  all  ages  that 

were  studied.  On  the  other  hand,  the  median  values  for  the  BMI  were 

almost  iden cal  for  the  Saudi's  and  USA's  girls  aged  3-9  years.  However, 

a er the  age of  9 years  the differences  in the  median values  for the  BMI 

were increased progressively due to the higher values for the Saudi's girls. 



570 

 

 



CONCLUSIONS:  The use of the NCHS growth standards is not appropriate 

for the assessment of growth of children that live in the high altitude area 

of Abha and further  studies are needed to  determine the exact impact  of 

high altitude on the growth patterns in children. 

 

 

J R Soc Promot Health. 2006 Jan;126(1):41-6. 



Body  Mass  Index  of  Kuwai   Children  Aged  3-9  Years: 

Reference Percentiles and Curves. 

Al-Isa AN, Thalib L. 

Department of  Community  Medicine  and  Behavioural  Sciences,  Faculty  of 

Medicine, University of Kuwait, P.O. Box 24923, Safat, Code 13110, Kuwait. 

alisa@hsc.edu.kw 

Abstract 

AIM:    The  suitability  of  using  the  standards  for  body  mass  index  (BMI), 

produced  in  the  U.S.  by  the  National  Center  for  Health  Statistics,  for 

assessing  overweight  and  obesity  among  children  in  Kuwait  and  other 

Arabian  Gulf  countries  has  not  been  examined.  These  standards  were 

obtained  from  better-nourished  and  genetically  different  populations  to 

those found  in  Kuwait and  in  other Gulf  region  countries. The  purpose  of 

this study was to develop BMI reference percentiles and curves appropriate 

for children aged 3-9 in these countries. 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling