Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet17/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   25

The Evaluation of Educational Achievement Efficacy Area Outcomes of the 
Third Primary Class Guidance Program 
 
Kasım Karataş 
kasimkaratas@outlook.com
 
İsmet Kaya 
 
One  of  the  competence  areas  described  in  the  Elementary  and  High  School  Classroom 
Guidance  Program  that  is  performed  in  Turkey  is  “educational  achievement”.  The  general 
outcomes  in  the  educational  achievement  competence  area  are;  students  develop  positive 
attitudes towards learning, efficiently plan their time and use their free time in accordance with 
their  interests.  In  addition,  they  review  their  study  habits  and  obtain  the  efficient  ways  for 
learning.  Therefore,  the  outcomes  of  educational  achievement  in  the  classroom  guidance 
program  have  a  great  importance.  In  this  study,  the  aim  is  to  reach  the  information  about  the 
objectives of the program,  classroom  activities and effectiveness  of the program  as  a  whole by 
evaluating  pupils’  achieving  the  goals  of  the  action  program's  objectives  relating  to  the 
competency  area  of  a  third  grade  primary  school  guidance  program.  What  is  the  level  of  the 
students to reach outcomes of educational achievement competence area of a third grade primary 
school  guidance  program?  In  this  study,  the  program  has  been  evaluated  by  using  screening 
model for sample-event (Karasar, 2009) because of the work on a limited group and adhering to 
measure  demanded  by  the  Tyler's  goal-based  approach  programs.  The  study  group  of  the 
research  is  28  third  grade  students  in  Tokat  KOMEC  Village  Primary  School  in  2013-2014 
school  years.  Data  was  collected  with  "Student  Self-Evaluation  Form",  "Observation  Form", 
"Guidance  Activities  Assessment  Form"  in  the  Primary  and  the  Secondary  School  Classroom 
Guidance  Program  and  "Third  Grade  Educational  Achievement  Area  Survey"  which  was 
developed by the researcher. In the analysis of quantitative data, when using the arithmetic mean, 
descriptive  analysis  technique  was  used  for  the  analysis  of  qualitative  data.  According  to  the 
results  of  the  descriptive  analysis  of  "Self-Evaluation  Form",  which  was  applied  in  order  to 
determine whether the student reached the gains related to educational attainment area with this 
program, and which was applied under the program at the end of each event, it was seen that the 
students reached their program goal.  However, in line with guidance of the students' reactions, 
interests and desires, it was demonstrated that the program reached the aim of the activities and 
the activities were appropriate to developmental and educational level. According to the result of 
the  survey  of  "Third  Grade  Educational  Achievement  Field  Survey",  it  was  concluded  that  the 
students reached the permanence of the desired target. As a result, according to the result of this 
study  whose  data  were  collected  by  Tyler's  goal-based  program  evaluation  approach,  it  can  be 
said  that  objectives  and  activities  implemented  under  the  competency  area  of  educational 
achievement of students in classroom guidance program  were qualitative enough to contribute to 
the students and therefore  effective. 
 
Keywords: Guidance, Classroom Guidance Program, Program Evaluation 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
114   
 
 
 
Mentoring and Coaching: The Example of the Aianteio Primary School during 
its Participation in The Network of School Innovation (LDK) 2008-2011 
 
Katerina Boutsi 
katboutsi@yahoo.com
 
Theodora Tsiagani 
 
The  aim  of  the  present  paper  is  to  bring  out  that  coaching  and  mentoring  are  both 
important mechanisms that, despite being quite different,  can be used in education contributing 
to the professional advancement of the participants so as to actively respond to the demands and 
recent  developments  in  their  work  environments.  Both  coaching  and  mentoring  intend  to 
advance  the  best  practices  inside  the  learning  environments  they  are  applied,  aiming  at  a 
Continuous Professional Development, CPD) (Bolam, 1993, Ηawkins & Smith, 2011). Coaching 
and mentoring practices were put into practice at the Aianteio Primary School at Salamina within 
the  framework  of  the  collaboration  between  the  school  and  the  Network  of  School  Innovation 
during the years 2008-2011. My role in this project, resulting from the fact that I worked at the 
Network of School Innovation, was that of the coordinator of the schools where I mainly acted as 
a mentor. As a whole our central aim was the training and the enhancement of the teachers so as 
they  could  become  able  to  implement  innovative  practices  during  their  teaching.  The  kind  of 
mentoring  we  adopted,  (choosing  from  the  existing  kinds,  mentoring  for  induction,  for 
progression and mentoring for challenge), was mentoring for progression, which intended to help 
teachers  with  experience  by  developing  their  professional  aptitude.  In  this  case,  the  mentor 
assists  the  teachers  to  reframe  and  enrich  their  previous  knowledge  and  experience  in  order  to 
understand the policies and philosophy of a new environment and so manage to successfully face 
new information (Bubb, 2005, 2007). That particular process played a crucial part in the school 
identity  and  culture  as  it  created  an  unprecedented  environment  of  change  where  collaboration 
practices developed not only between all the members of the school community (Head-teacher, 
the  school  staff,  students  and  parents),  but  also  between  other  people  and  the  school,  and 
between  other  schools  and  the  school.  Mentoring  functioned  exemplarily  and  strengthened  the 
production  of  critical  discourse  on  the  educational  process;  on  a  further  level  it  assisted  the 
teachers to recognize the fact that despite the limitations posed by their working framework, at 
the same time there exist many opportunities for active intervention and change. 
 
Keywords:  Collaboration, professional  development  and progress,  mentoring  and coaching, the 
development of abilities and skills. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
115   
 
 
 
The Relationship between the Conflict Management Strategies of the Primary Education 
Administrators and Organizational Climate According to Teachers’ Perceptions 
 
Kazim Celik 
kazimcelik@gmail.com
 
Kadir Catakdere 
 
Conflict  management  is  the  way  of  action  taken  by  the  conflicting  sides  or 
another third party. Conflict  management might  need the presence of conflict  which 
stands at a level and the management of this conflict in different conditions with the 
appropriate  strategies.  Organization  climate  is  the  series  of  features  that  gives  an 
identity  to  the  organization  or  affects  the  behaviors  of  the  members  of  the  school 
organization. The organizational climate of a school is the whole of inside features of 
the  institution  which  form  the  behaviors  of  the  members  and  distinguish  that  school 
from  others.  The  aim  of  this  research  which  was  performed  by  the  relational  search 
(scanning)  model  is  to  define  the  relation  between  school  managers’  conflict 
management  strategies  and  the  organizational  climate  based  on  the  teachers’ 
perceptions.  
The  research  was  performed  on  a  total  of  230  primary  and  secondary  school 
teachers who worked in Tire and Bayındır provinces of İzmir in 2013-2014 Academic 
Year.  The data of the research was obtained by Şahin (2007) “Conflict Management 
Strategies  of  School  Principals  Scale’’  and  with  the  help  of  the  translation  of 
“Organizational  Climate  Perception  Scale’’  by  Yalçınkaya  (2000).  The  results 
revealed  that  according  to  the  teachers’  perception,  there  was  not  a  significant 
difference between their type of institutions, the schools which they graduated from, 
the  working  background  in  their  schools  and  their  branches  while  the  directors 
performed  conflict  strategies.  Most  of  the  teachers  in  the  early  years  of  their 
profession  had  negative  thoughts  about  the  conflict  management  methods  of  the 
principals but it was observed that they chose the way of reconciliation by recognizing 
the  institution  and  developing  communication  by  the  time.  However,  it  is  clear  that 
the increase in the school principals’ communication skills affected their perception of 
conflict management strategies in a positive manner. Additionally, the organizational 
climate of the schools had a parallel rise with the principals’ conflict strategies in the 
teachers’ perception.  
Finally,  in  this  study  the  concepts  of  domination  and  avoidance  of  conflict 
management strategies of managing principals’ perceptions of organizational climate 
had a significant effect on the result obtained.  
 
Keywords: Conflict, Conflict Management, Organizational Climate 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
116   
 
 
 
The Music of Measurement and Evaluation Concepts 
 
Kenan Demir 
kenandemirkfe@gmail.com
 
 
In  this  study,  the  concepts  of  measurement  were  taught  by  using  different  ways.  In 
teaching  the  concepts  of  this  course’s  content,  many  different  teaching-learning  ways  such  as 
mainly creative drama, cooperative learning, multiple intelligences, various encodings, analogy, 
games,  music,  dance,  rhythm,  were  used  together  in  coordination.  After  teaching-learning 
activities in the course, students wrote lyrics about the concepts of this measurement-evaluation
set  the  music  of  popular  songs  appropriate  to  these  words  and  presented  these  studies  in  the 
classroom. At the end of study carried out by 2
nd
 year students of music department a total of 33 
songs  on  the  concepts  of  measurement-evaluation  were  comprised.  The  words  written  by  the 
students  to  reflect  the  concepts  of  measurement-evaluation  were  rendered  to  be  presented  in  a 
concert by adapted to  today's popular songs’ music. At the end of the preparatory works done 
throughout  an  academic  year,  a  concert  with  13  songs  was  organized  called  "The  Music  of 
Concepts".  The  concert  was  conducted  by  35  students.  At  the  beginning  and  end  of  the  study, 
conducted with pre/post-test quasi-experimental design without control group, a multiple-choice 
achievement  test  was  used.  In  order  to  ensure  the  scope  of  validity  of  data  collection  tool 
developed  by  the  researcher,  indicator  chart  and  expert  opinions  were  utilized.  The  qualitative 
data  were  obtained  by  taking  written  opinions  and  focus  group  interviews.  For  both  of 
interviews,  an  interview  form  composed  of  open-ended  questions  based  on  expert  opinion  was 
used. In the comparison of the average scores t test was used for associated (dependent) samples. 
These qualitative data  were analyzed descriptively. At the end of the study  carried out  through 
original  activities,  it  was  determined  that  the  difference  between  two  average  scores  of  31 
students,  who obtained them  from  pre and post-test,  was  statistically significant  in  favor of the 
final  test  at  the  0,05  level  of  significance.  Students  participated  in  this  study  stated  that  they 
reinforced  what  they  had  learned  in  the  course  thanks  to  the  concert  preparations  by  repeating 
them  in  different  ways.  Thus  they  learned  permanently  and  in  a  funny  way  by  transferring 
information  to  real  life  and  such  activities  made positive  contributions  to the teaching skills  of 
them. At the end of the study, it was determined that using various educational ways together by 
blending them increased students’ achievements significantly. And again it was determined that 
original  activities  affected  the  students’  various  features  such  as  creativity,  collaboration,  self-
confidence. 
 
Keywords:  Measurement,  evaluation,  creative  teaching-learning,  creative  drama,  concept 
teaching, 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
117   
 
 
 
Supporting Professional Development of Teachers in Classroom Use of ICT via 
Distance Learning Adaptability 
 
Konstantina Kotsari 
conkotsari@gmail.com
 
Michail Kostoglou  
 
This proposal describes the construction of the theoretical framework of distance learning 
training  of  teachers  with  regards  to  the  use  of  ICT  in  classroom  teaching.  Specifically,  it 
discusses the ability of teachers to design and use a logo-like learning environment through the 
construction  of  educational  geometry  scenarios.  At  the  same  time  they  have  the  opportunity  to 
engage  in  experiential  activities  of  meaning  making,  analysis  and  application  of  digital  tools 
(Web  2.0),  and  modeling  artifacts  in  practice.  As  such,  teachers  learn  to  construct  logo-like 
environments,  using  E-slate  software  for  teaching  geometry  or  other  disciplines  in  Elementary 
School. 
Based  on  principles  of  distance  learning  and  adult  education  we  built  specific  activities  in 
accordance  with  the  principles  of  the  “New  Learning”  (Kalantzis  and  Cope,  2013)  and 
personalization  according  to  the  needs  of  the  learner.  We  used  the  platform  INSPIREus,  an 
innovation in the field of distance education, which could be used to train teachers in the use of 
ICT  with  additional  educational  value  in  the  classroom.  However,  as  reported  by  Hanson  & 
Robson  (2003),  the  primary  issue  is  the  parameter  of  the  learning  effectiveness  in  Online 
Learning  and  the  detection  of  the  pedagogical  dimension  of  tools  to  support  learning  norms  in 
conjunction  with  communication  and  interaction.  Nevertheless,  the  fact  that  new  technologies 
are the basis of an evolving socio - economic change, which does not leave out the influence of 
the  educational  system,  could  be  the  framework  of  teachers  professional  development.  In  this 
context,  this  presentation  is  a  proposal  to  implement  distance  teacher  training,  taking  into 
account the strengthening of the role of the teacher. In this framework, the teacher as designer of 
activities  appears  in  the  model  TPACK  through  multiple  interactions  that  apply  the  triple 
dynamic parameters of knowledge: Content Knowledge (CK), Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) and 
Technological  Knowledge (TK). These dynamic  dimensions  of knowledge in  education are the 
mainstay of the planning proposal training scenarios concerning with the pedagogical use of ICT 
in teaching practice through the adaptive learning platform, INSPIREus. 
 
Keywords:  Distance  Learning,  Teacher  training,  Adaptive  learning  platform,  Professional 
development, Design activities 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
118   
 
 
 
Teacher training: Basic Characteristics of the Educator of the 21
st
 Century 
 
Konstantinos Kalemis 
kkalemis@primedu.uoa.gr
 
Anna Kostarelou 
 
Teaching in the 21
st
 century will be profoundly impacted by universal access to information, 
advances  in  neuroscience  that  help  us  better  understand  learning  processes  and  the  development  of 
assessment tools which guide teaching interventions. Contemporary teaching needs to be much more 
than  information  transmission.  Teachers  need  to  respond  to  these  developments  and  integrate  them 
into  their  practice,  working  collaboratively  to  solve  problems  and  share  the  latest  advances  in 
practice.  Just  as  we  require  high  standards  for  entry  into  other  professional  degrees  like  medicine, 
law  and  psychology,  we  should  require  equally  high  standards  for  entry  into  teacher  education. 
Therefore, there needs to be some rationalization of the numbers of school-leavers studying teaching 
at  the  undergraduate  level,  particularly  in  areas  of  over-supply.  Large  scale  education  in  virtual 
worlds is an emerging phenomenon. The subject has been discussed in the literature for almost two 
decades but there is little agreement on how to design an effective virtual environment for learning 
(Cobb  and  Fraser,  2005).  Many  of  the  existing  research  projects  have  taken  a  social  constructivist 
approach  to  learning  in  virtual  worlds.  Social  constructivist  learning  looks  at  the  students  as 
“constructors  and  producers  of  personal  knowledge”  (Jonassen,  1996).  Thus,  schools  of  education 
must  design  programs  that  help  prospective  teachers  to  understand  deeply  a  wide  array  of  things 
about learning, social and cultural contexts, and teaching and be able to enact these understandings in 
complex classrooms serving increasingly diverse students; in addition, if  prospective teachers are to 
succeed at this task, schools of education must design programs that transform the kinds of settings 
in which novices learn to teach and later become teachers. This means that the enterprise of teacher 
education must venture out further and further from the university and engage ever more closely with 
schools in a mutual transformation agenda, with all of the struggle and messiness involved. Distance 
education  is  becoming  increasingly  common  in  higher  education.  Various  network–based  methods 
are  now  used  to  complement  classroom  education  to  reduce  the  effects  of  distance,  making  it 
independent  of  time  and  physical  location.  One  of  the  perennial  dilemmas  of  teacher  education  is 
how  to  integrate  theoretically  based  knowledge  that  has  traditionally  been  taught  in  university 
classrooms with the experience-based knowledge that has traditionally been located in the practice of 
teachers and the realities of classrooms and schools. Traditional versions of teacher education have 
often  had  students  taking  batches  of  front-loaded  course  work  in  isolation  from  practice  and  then 
adding a short dollop of student teaching to the end of the program—often in classrooms that did not 
model the practices that had previously been described in abstraction. By contrast, the most powerful 
programs  require  students  to  spend  extensive  time  in  the  field  throughout  the  entire  program, 
examining  and applying  the  concepts  and  strategies  they  are  simultaneously  learning  about in  their 
courses alongside teachers who can show them how to teach in ways that are responsive to learners. 
Although teacher education is only one component of what is needed to enable high-quality teaching, 
it is essential for the success of all the other reforms urged on schools. To advance knowledge about 
teaching, to spread good practice, and to enhance equity for children, thus, it is essential that teacher 
educators and policy makers seek strong preparation for teachers that is universally available, rather 
than a rare occurrence that is available only to a lucky few. 
 
Keywords: teacher's training, evaluation, e-learning, experience-based knowledge
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
119   
 
 
 
“…and They Lived Happily Ever After!” The Use of Narrative in Researching 
Greek and Turkish Student Teachers’ Perceptions of the Ethnic “Other” 
 
Kostas Magos 
magos@uth.gr
 
 
The use of storytelling and narrative in educational research is not an innovation. Many 
researchers have used narrative as a means for researching perceptions and attitudes of teachers. 
Teachers, through narrative inquiry, can rethink their work and see the changes they make each 
year, whether they are successful or not. Narratives help teachers reexamine and reflect the views 
and positions they have already adopted through a fresh critical eye. The reflection on previous 
perceptions and attitudes constitutes the beginning of a transformative process that is capable of 
leading someone towards the change of these perceptions and attitudes. There are a large number 
of studies in which narrative and storytelling have been used for intercultural training, both  for 
student  and  in-service  teachers.  Overall,  these  studies  agree  that  teachers  who,  through 
narratives,  analyze  and  interpret  their  school  practices  may  gradually  succeed  in  raising 
intercultural  awareness  while  also  achieving  professional  and  personal  improvement.  Many 
researchers  underline  the  importance  of  using  personal  stories  as,  through  such  a  method,  it  is 
possible to demonstrate how teachers use their cultural references to create teaching and learning 
environments  related  to  the  existence  of  intercultural  dimensions.  The  aim  of  the  research 
presented  here  is  to  search  the  perceptions  of  Greek  and  Turkish  female  pre  and  post-graduate 
student  teachers  of  primary  and  secondary  education  concerning  the  ethnic  “self”,  the  ethnic 
“other”  and  the  desired  relationship  between  them.  The  participants  of  the  research  were  102 
Greek female pre-graduate students of the Department of Pre-school Education of the University 
of  Thessaly  and  36  Turkish  female  post-graduate  students  of  School  of  Education  of  Bilkent 
University. The methodology used was the narrative inquiry, which was based on the analysis of 
the sample members’ narratives. Although in most researches the autobiographical narratives or 
life stories of the sample members are used, folk tales, jokes and funny stories or other types of 
speech  coming  from  research  subjects’  narratives  can  be  effectively  used  too.  In  this  specific 
research the narratives analyzed use the motif of a folk tale. A story made for this purpose was 
given to  the  research subjects  where the main heroes represented the  ethnic self and the ethnic 
other.  The  students  who  participated  in  the  research  were  asked  to  finish  the  story  as  they 
wished.  The  findings  of  the  research  highlighted  that  the  narratives  of  both  Greek  and  Turkish 
student teachers often appeared to be the common stereotypes concerning the ethnic “other” but 
at  the  same  time  they  expressed  the  willingness  these  stereotypes  to  be  overcome  through  the 
creation of a fruitful and effective relationship between the ethnic “self” and the ethnic “other”. 
 
Keywords: narrative, storytelling, teacher education, stereotypes, Greece, Turkey 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling