Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet14/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
88 
 
 
 
 
The Importance of Teachers’ Mastery Goal Orientation and Autonomous 
Motivations for Their Professional Development and Educational Innovation 
 
Georgios Gorozidis 
gorozidis@pe.uth.gr
 
Athanasios G. Papaioannou 
 
Theoretical  and  empirical  evidence  suggests  that  the  quality  of  teacher  motivation  is 
essential  for  in-service  training  success  and  the  implementation  process  of  innovative  teaching 
practices.  Motivational  theories  of  Self-determination  and  Achievement  goals  may  provide  a 
useful framework to optimally design professional training aimed at promoting teacher learning 
and innovative curricula. This approach underlines the importance of teacher motivation quality 
for  the  educational  procedure.  Moreover  it  focuses  on  the  formation  of  the  appropriate 
educational  environment  for  the  cultivation  of  teachers’  dispositional  mastery  goal  orientation 
(i.e., the pursuit of personal improvement) and the enhancement of their autonomous motivations 
(i.e., intrinsic & identified regulations) in work. According to theory and findings of our studies 
which  are  presented  here  (e.g.,  Gorozidis  &  Papaioannou  2011,  Teachers’  self-efficacy, 
achievement  goals,  attitudes  and  intentions  to  implement  the  new  Greek  physical  education 
curriculum, European Physical Education Review, 17, 231-253; Gorozidis & Papaioannou 2014, 
Teachers'  motivation  to  participate  in  training  and  to  implement  innovations,  Teaching  and 
Teacher  Education,  39,  1-11;  Papaioannou  &  Christodoulidis,  2007,  A  measure  of  teachers’ 
achievement  goals,  Educational  Psychology,  27,  349-361),  this  can  be  achieved  if  the 
school/work  climate  encourages  teacher  personal  development  and  fulfills  their  innate 
psychological  needs  for  autonomy,  competence  and  relatedness.  This  educational  environment 
must  (a)  put  emphasis  on  personal  improvement,  effort,  and  persistence  with  revised  teaching 
practices,  (b)  deliver  opportunities  for  experimentation  and  sustained  collaboration  with 
colleagues (e.g., teacher networks), officials and experts (e.g., guidance, support, non-threatening 
feedback),  (c)  provide  teachers  the  choice  to  actively  shape  reforms,  and  to  customize  their 
training  programs.  The  practices  outlined  here  are  consistent  with  scholars’  suggestions  for 
effective  teacher  professional  development,  but  they  are  opposite  to  most  current  teacher 
assessment  practices  and  the  top-down  format  of  one-shot  teacher  training.  Policy  makers 
usually  promote  educational  innovations  in  a  controlling  manner,  by  providing  external 
incentives and coercion as the only motivators to get teachers engaged in professional retraining 
and  the  implementation  of  new  practices.  In  addition,  existing  accountability  systems  induce 
social  comparison  between  teachers  promoting  their  performance  goal  orientations.  However, 
these  conditions  have  the  characteristics  that  produce  superficial  and  temporary  educational 
outcomes  through  teacher  controlled  motivation,  which  has  no  positive  impact  on  teachers’ 
motivation  to  get  involved with  training  and innovative pedagogies while decreasing  teachers’ 
quality of motivation. On the other hand, underestimation of postgraduate qualifications and in-
service  education  for  teachers’  career  in  education  might  undermine  teachers’  mastery  goal 
adoption and implementation of innovations in education. 
 
Keywords: Achievement goals theory, Self-determination theory, in-service teacher training 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
89 
 
 
 
 
A Teaching Approach Regarding Presentation of Amplifiers to Future 
Electronic Engineering Educators 
 
Gerasimos Pagiatakis 
gpagiatakis@aspete.gr
 
Nikolaos F. Voudoukis 
 
Though  courses  on  electronic  engineering  usually  aim  at  students  and  future  engineers 
developing  the  necessary  theoretical  and  technical  background  to  face  the  challenges  of  an  ever 
changing  profession,  for  future  educators  it  is  equally  important  the  various  electronic  engineering 
topics to be presented in a generalized, unified and well-structured manner that will enable students 
to  create  the  appropriate  background  for  their  future  teaching  assignments.  A  difficult  topic  in  that 
respect is electronic amplifiers which lie at the core of most analog electronics courses and, indeed, 
most  electronic  engineering  syllabi.  Ιt  has  been  observed  that  the  diversity  in  both,  the  amplifier 
types and the modeling and calculation processes makes it difficult for students to develop a general 
and unified view of the subject. More specifically, it has been noticed that student have difficulties in 
comprehending  the  common  background  of  the  various  amplifier types  which,  in  turn,  could  be an 
obstacle in their future efforts to convert their knowledge to a viable and efficient teaching practice. 
Taking  the  above  observation  into  account,  the  course  in  Electronics  offered  at  the  Electronic 
Engineering Education major of the School of Pedagogical and Technological Education (ASPETE, 
Athens,  Greece)  has  been  partly  re-oriented  in  that,  apart  from  studying  basic  aspects  of  specific 
amplifiers  (such  as  transistor  or  operational  amplifiers),  it  gives  emphasis  to  the  presentation  of 
amplifiers  in  a  general  and  unified  manner.  The  course  follows  an  induction-production  approach. 
The  students  are  first  introduced  to  basic  amplifier  circuits  (e.g.  transistor-based  or  operational 
amplifiers)  before  they  encounter  a  more  general  presentation  of  the  various  amplifier  types 
including  their  modeling  by  means  of  common  Thevenin/Norton  equivalent  circuits  and  low-pass 
and  high-pass  filters.  The  next  step  is  the  application  of  the  general  theory  to  specific  amplifier 
circuits,  including  the  ones  presented  during  the  starting  lectures  of  the  course.  Depending  on  the 
time available and the overall performance of the class, the study may conclude with more advanced 
topics such as the frequency response of amplifiers, active filters etc. An additional advantage of this 
approach is its applicability to audiences with diverse mathematical and/or technical background. In 
an  attempt  to  evaluate  the  effect  of  the  applied  approach  (and,  at  the  same  time,  interconnect  the 
technological and the pedagogical aspect of the presented material) the students are asked to describe 
the content of a thirty (30)-hour module on amplifiers, indicating the exact topics to be examined in 
relation  with  the  required  teaching  time  and  literature  (specific  chapters  from  up  to  four  (4)  books 
available in the School’s library). The students are also asked to fill in a brief questionnaire regarding 
the above assignment. Due to the large size of the class and the fact that the described approach was 
applied for the first time, it was decided that, at least at this stage, it should be combined with rather 
traditional  modes  of  teaching.  However,  the  plan  is  the  amplifier  module  to  be  delivered  through 
more modern teaching practices, such as project-oriented learning or “think-pair-share” activities. A 
simple idea (to encourage students’ active participation) could be the students to start outlining the 
amplifier  module  just  after  introductory  classes  and  also  propose  simple  lab  exercises  that  could 
support the module’s lectures. 
 
Keywords: engineering education, teacher education, electronics teaching
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
90 
 
 
 
 
The Value of the Group in Effective Educational Process 
 
Gerasimos Rentifis 
gerasimosrentifis@yahoo.gr
 
 
The era we live in  is  characterized by strong liquidity, ongoing  changes  and upheavals, 
insecurity  and  disillusionment.  The  following  conditions  are  affecting  the  human  character. 
Modern man is distinguished by intense selfish disposition, with strong introversion, compelling 
him to more and more entrenched in his personal entourage. On the other hand, it is difficult to 
articulate authentic personal reason. If education is able to operate intervention in the course of 
society, reversing undesirable behavior, then we need teaching models that enhance the mood for 
contact and communication, cooperativeness and solidarity, autonomy and action. Such a model 
is collaborative, based on the dynamics of teamwork and harmonious cooperation instructor and 
trainees,  while  respecting  student  relationships  and  maximize  the  learning  potential  of  the 
student. In this paper we will focus attention on how the teaching in working groups can be an 
important teaching proposal and contribute to the fuller elaboration of the curriculum. Teamwork 
as  a  teaching  method,  has  experienced  recent  special  development  because  of  the  growing 
influence  that  the  constructive  and  sociocultural  approaches  to  teaching  and  learning.  The 
pedagogical  literature  suggests  the  composition  of  groups  consisting  of  three  members  or  four 
members  as  well  as  the  network  of  relationships  formed  between  three  or  four  people  is  more 
complex and accelerates deeper treatment of each subject. In this context we will concentrate our 
attention on techniques by which the teacher can use to improve team cohesion. In particular we 
will  look  with  what  methods  can  ensure  communication  between  team  members  and  there  is  a 
positive  interdependence  between  the  members  through  the  fair  sharing  of  the  work  and  the 
commitment of individual and collective responsibility. Finally, we highlight how important the 
trainer to treat each group as unique, with ongoing process, understand the contexts in which it 
operates and exploits emerging every time roles for the benefit of the team, aware of his personal 
approach what it entails. Looking forward, therefore, to form a group of school work as the most 
modern,  creative  and  effective  form  of  school  work,  attempting  to  investigate  the  group 
dynamics.  
 
Keywords: Educational group, techniques, dynamic. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
91 
 
 
 
 
The Effect of Risk Factors Compensation Studies on Disadvantaged Children’s 
Bully Behaviors 
 
Gönül Onur Sezer 
gnlsezer@gmail.com
 
Ömür Sadioğlu 
 
The  term  “disadvantaged  children”  is  used  to  refer  to  those  who  are  economically, 
educationally, linguistically, or socially disadvantaged. Definitely this phrase is used to define as 
children  who  lack  the  basic  necessities  of  life,  who  have  been  denied  the  basic  and  universal 
rights of children, the opportunity to grow normally at his/her own natural rate, who are subject 
to detrimental environmental stresses of any kind and handicapped or disabled because of certain 
conditions of exogenous origin and lastly, who are at risk of future psycho-educational problems. 
The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of compensation program which was held as 
a  University–Sector  Cooperation  Project  “Be  My  Hope  Project”  between  Uludag  University, 
Faculty of Education and Bursa Provincial Security Directorate’s Child Branch on disadvantaged 
children’s bullying behaviors.  Prevention studies and programs aim to prevent the occurrence of 
situations  that  can  place  the  student  at  risk  in  the  future.  Compensation  studies  require  a 
sophisticated  and  comprehensive  study.  Compensation  studies  provide  children  who  encounter 
risk factor and are affected negatively tend to have a deviant behavior, exhibit social disharmony, 
and in  order to  help  him overcome this disharmony social organization and efforts are needed. 
Aim  of  the  Be  My  Hope  Project  is  to  help  disadvantaged  children,  who  are  unable  to  benefit 
from  the  same  opportunities  with  their  peers  due  to  unfavorable  conditions  of  living 
environment,  to  participate  in  academic  and  social  activities  with  teacher  candidates  at  the 
Faculty  of  Education,  to  turn  teacher  candidates  into  role  models  and  to  reintroduce  these 
students  to  society  as  self-respecting,  considerate,  happy,  active  and  productive  individuals. 
Within the scope of this Project study times, social activities and sport activities are held for their 
academic  developments  by  teacher  candidates  and  disadvantaged  children  in  recreational  and 
sports  facilities  provided  by  the  Osmangazi  Youth  Centre.  In  line  with  this  objective  Colorado 
School  Climate  Survey,  which  was  developed  by  Garrity  et  al.,  (2000)  was  used.  The 
questionnaire was designed to measure several aspects of bullying. Several subscales were used 
in  the  questionnaire.  The  subjects  of  this  study  are  40  disadvantaged  children  (35  boys  and  5 
girls)  who  were  selected  after  organizing  interviews  with  counselors  and  directors  of  four 
schools  decided  by  Bursa  Provincial  Security  Directorate’s  Child  Branch.  The  analysis  of  this 
study is still underway. 
 
Keywords: Disadvantaged children, bully behavior, compensation study, risk factor 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
92 
 
 
 
 
According to Holland’s Theory of Careers; the Personality Profiles of Turkish 
Teacher Candidates 
 
Guliz  Sahin 
guliz@balikesir.edu.tr
 
Mehmet Ali Arıcı 
Neslihan Yucelsen 
 
Human who is a social creature tends to live together with other people. Raising qualified 
individuals  in  society  can  take  place  with  education  provided  in  high  quality  educational 
institutions.  An  individual’s  professional  developments  have  a  great  importance  in  providing 
personality  and  social  adaptation.  Some  factors  such  as  teacher’s  candidates’  suitability,  their 
traits, why they choose their professions play a major role in their professions’ achievement. The 
purpose  of  this  work  is  to  search  the  relationship  between  Turkish  teacher  candidates’ 
satisfaction  with  their  professions  and  their  personality.  For  this  purposes,  Holland’s  theory  of 
careers  theoretically  underlines  this  work.  According  to  Holland’s  theory,  there  are  six 
personality  types.  These  are  Realistic,  Investigative,  Artistic,  Social,  Enterprising,  and 
Conventional.  There  are  also  six types of  work environments  in  the same names.  This  study is 
planned  to  carry  out  with  340  Turkish  teacher  candidates  studying  in  three  universities  as 
teaching departments  which are situated in  Turkey’s  east  and west  and are required answers to 
following  questions:  How  is  the  personality  profile  of  students  studying  in  Turkish  teaching 
department?  Is  there  a  relationship  between  Turkish  teacher  candidates’  satisfaction  with  their 
professions and their personality? If so, which personality type is closely related to it? How is the 
relationship among the personality types of Turkish teacher candidates who are studying in the 
western and eastern regions of Turkey? This research planned as a descriptive research, validity 
and  reliability  studies  were  made  as  data  collection  tools  by  Perkmen  and  Şahin.  The  codes 
career test consisting of 30 items in 5 point Likert scale is applied to the teacher candidates and it 
is  analyzed  using  statistical  methods  by  researchers.  It  is  expected  to  use  these  results  of 
relationship between acquisition of the profession and personality relations in the relevant works 
while teacher training programs are preparing. 
 
Keywords:  career  choice,  career  satisfaction,  Holland’s  theory,  Turkish  teacher  candidate, 
teacher training 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
93 
 
 
 
 
Evaluation of Professional Ethics Principles by Pre-Service Teachers 
 
Gülsün Şahan 
gulsunsahan@hotmail.com
 
 
Teaching  as  a  profession  is  a  respected  and  prominent  profession  all  over  the  world. 
Teachers  also  shape  such  ethical  perceptions  of  their  students  as  good,  bad,  right  and  wrong. 
With  their  ethical  behaviors,  teachers  serve  as  a  role-model  to  their  students.  The  members  of 
this profession who shape the future generations do not have a chance to make any mistakes. The 
purpose of this study is to evaluate the opinions of pre-service teachers on the ethical principles 
of  teaching  as  a  profession.  Qualitative  research  method  was  used  in  the  study  and  students’ 
opinions  were  collected  using  semi-structured  interview  forms.  Using  convenience  sampling,  a 
purposive sampling method, 24 senior students at Bartın University Faculty of Education were 
interviewed.  Focus  group  meetings  were  made  with  6  students  from  each  primary  education, 
social studies, science teaching and religious culture and ethics teaching departments. 
 
Keywords: Ethics, teaching, professional ethics, pre-service teachers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
94 
 
 
 
 
According to Ibn Haldun the Needs of Individual for Education and Teacher 
 
Hacer Âşık Ev 
hacerev@gmail.com 
 
This  research  attempts  to  elicit  the  opinions  of  Ibn  Khaldun  about  the  individual  needs 
for  education-teacher  and  the  teaching  profession.  In  this  research,  literature  review,  document 
analysis and content analysis have been used. Literature review has been done to investigate the 
list of published resources on searching topic (Karasar, 1999: 189). Document analysis includes 
analysis  of  written  materials  that  include  information  about  fact  or  facts  that  are  going  to  be 
examined  (Yıldırım,  2011:  187).  Karasar  calls  “document  scanning”  the  method  that  he 
expresses as data collecting technique and he states that this technique is defined as investigating 
systematically as  data source of current  records or documents  by Best  (Karasar, 1999:  183).  In 
qualitative research, document analysis can be a data collecting method alone, but it can also be 
used  together  with  other  data  collecting  methods  (Yıldırım,  2011:  187).  In  content  analysis, 
datum summarized and interpreted by descriptive analysis are subject to a deeper process and in 
this way datum are tried to be defined, possible truths hidden in datum are tried to be discovered 
(Yıldırım, 2011: 227). Some aspects in documents, philosophies, language, expression, etc. can 
be understood with  content  analysis according to  deepness  and some criterions (Karasar, 1999: 
184). In research firstly with literature review documents about the topic were reached and then 
they were analyzed with document analysis and content analysis. This presentation is limited to 
Ibn  Khaldun’s  only  opinions  about  teaching  profession  and  individual  need  for  education  and 
teacher, not his all opinions about education. Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) who was born in 1332 in 
Tunisia, lived in the second half of XIV century that coincided with the last period of the Middle 
Ages in which The Renaissance started to spread in Europe and beginning of XV century (Sâtî 
el-Husrî,  2001:  59).  Ibn  Khaldun  is  considered  and  recognized  not  only  as  the  pioneer  of 
sociology that he called as “İlm-i Tabiat-i Umrâni”, but also as a history philosopher. According 
to  Ibn  Khaldun,  human  consisting  of  flesh  and  soul  differing  from  other  living  creatures  with 
mind (ability to think) and predominates. He defines the mind as an ability that separates human 
from animals and makes him/her superior, a power given to human beings to make a living and a 
tool that reaches science and arts (Ibn Khaldun, no date:42, 490, 517). However, human’s power 
of  mind/consciousness  or  thought  cannot  be  developed  automatically;  there  is  a  need  for 
education  to  develop  that  power.  According  to  Ibn  Khaldun,  as  food  and  nutrition  develop  the 
body,  education  develops  and  matures  human  soul  and  mind.  People,  who  have  tendency  both 
goodness and badness, can separate good from bad, ugly and disordered thanks to education and 
so  they  become  different  from  wild  animals  (Ibn  Khaldun,  trans.  Uludağ,  2004).  If  people  are 
informed and trained  about  what  ugly and disordered things  are, how to  distinguish  them from 
good things and if people repeat good ones, they can produce good and nice things by becoming 
different  from  animals  at  the  end  of  this  training  (Âşık  Ev,  2012).  Khaldun  emphasizes  on 
importance of education at early ages. For him, education, which is given at early ages, is more 
effective  and  builds  a  tough  basis  for  the  next  (Ibn  Khaldun,  trans.  Ugan,  1989).  Ibn  Khaldun 
indicates  that  people  need  religion’s  education  especially  in  development  of  social  and  ethical 
motives. According to Ibn Khaldun, teacher is an obligation as education is for people. He lines 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
95 
 
 
 
 
up  the  reasons  that  people  need  teacher  like  this:  The  first  reason  is  people’s  incentive  of 
curiosity. Second is that all skills are about body and so they need education of teacher. Ability 
becomes  skill  as  using  it;  unused,  undeveloped  abilities  weakened  and  rusted.  When  abilities 
become skills, a teacher’s education is needed. Third reason is that human being is social being. 
A teacher’s help and guidance are necessaries for a social being, human, to both to continue life 
and to learn information and skill. Another reason is a need for a person to whom people can ask 
and learn what they do not know. Ibn Khaldun, taking courses from a great number of teachers is 
one of the factors that determine student success in education. 
 
Keywords: Ibn Khaldun, education, teacher, teaching profession. 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
96 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling