Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet10/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   25

 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
58 
 
 
 
 
Undergraduate Student Teachers’ Views about the Implementation of 
Differentiated Instruction in Primary School Classrooms during a School 
Teaching Practice Program 
 
Diamanto Filippatou 
filipd@uth.gr
 
Evgenia Vassilaki 
Stavroula Kaldi 
 
During  the  last  decade  international  literature  illustrates  the  educational  challenge  of 
serving  academically  diverse  learners  in  regular  classroom.  In  order  to  address  the  educational 
challenge  of  learner  diversity  researchers  have  proposed  the  implementation  of  differentiated 
instruction which is regarded as a philosophy in new pedagogies. Differentiated instruction refers 
to  a  teaching  process  based  on  teaching  routines  that  correspond  to  the  large  span  of  pupils’ 
differences in mixed ability classrooms, such as pupils’ readiness, interests and learning style in 
order  to  maximize  the  learning  opportunities  for  every  pupil.  However,  it  can  be  claimed  that 
many  teacher  education  programs  are  not  adequately  preparing  prospective  teachers  for  the 
inevitable increase in academic and cultural diversity among students. In the Greek context data 
on  how  student  teachers  experience  the  implementation  of  differentiated  instruction  in  the 
primary school classroom have not been reported. Moreover, similar research in the international 
context  is  scarce.  Based  on  the  above  the  aim  of  the  present  study  was  to  investigate 
undergraduate student teachers’ views about the implementation of differentiated instruction in 
primary mainstream  school  classrooms during the component of their school  teaching practice. 
The  present  research  is  qualitative.  Participants  were  180  student  teachers  following  an 
undergraduate four-year university-based course. Three cohorts of student teachers (between the 
academic  years  2009-2010  and  2011-2012)  implemented  a  two-teaching  hour  language  lesson 
under  the  principles  and  appropriate  strategies  of  differentiated  instruction  during  the  last 
component  of  their  school  teaching  practice  in  the  final  year  of  their  studies.  After  the 
implementation phase each student teacher produced a written reflection on this task. Therefore, 
the  research  instrument  used  was  written  texts.  Content  analysis  was  carried  out  in  order  to 
identify the main axes of student teachers’ views on the above issues. From the outcomes of the 
study it appears that although the majority of student teachers reported that it was necessary to 
differentiate  instruction  in  the  classroom,  they  seemed  to  lack  a  universal  concept  of 
differentiated instruction philosophy. As a result, pre-service teachers reported conflicting beliefs 
regarding  planning  and  implementing  differentiated  instruction.  Qualitative  data  revealed  that 
differentiated instruction had a positive impact on all pupils’ participation in the lesson and on 
pupils with low achievement and learning difficulties engagement in the learning process as well 
as on their feelings about learning. 
 
Keywords: student teachers, differentiated instruction, reflecting writing 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
59 
 
 
 
 
The Views of Uludağ University State Conservatory Middle School Students 
about Living Beings and Vitality Attributes 
 
Dilek Zeren Özer 
dzeren@uludag.edu.tr
 
Sema Nur Güngör 
Muhlis Özkan 
 
One of five learning domains in the primary education science and technology course is 
‘Living  Beings  and  Life’.  In  this  learning  domain,  the  concept  of  living  being  has  to  be 
internalized  very  well.  In  learning  this  concept,  students  put  what  they  have  in  their  minds  in 
action to perceive it rather than understanding it based on what they are reading and listening to. 
As a result, confusion comes out, and it becomes difficult to learn concepts (Kılıç et al., 2001). 
Showing  the  development  of  the  concept  of  living  being  in  children,  Piaget  (1929)  found  that 
children regarded anything having a function or an activity as a living being initially (at the age 
of 3 to 7) and started to consider anything that moved as a living being later on (at the age of 7 to 
8).  Some  studies  report  that  activity  is  the  preeminent  vitality  attribute  in  children’s  minds 
(Tamir et al., 1981; Kılıç et al., 2001; Bahar et al., 2002). This study aims to identify the views 
of  middle  school  5
th
,  6
th
,  7
th
,  and  8
th
  grade  students  attending  the  Uludağ  University  State 
Conservatory about living beings and vitality attributes. Developmental research method, which 
is  a  descriptive  research  approach,  was  used  and  it  is  a  cross-sectional  study.  31  students  (23 
females and 8 males) participated in the study. A survey consisting of two chapters was used for 
data collection. In the first part of the survey, 17 living and non-living beings were listed. Then 
the  students  were  requested  to  explain  their  reasons  for  calling  these  things  “living”  or  “non-
living”.  In  the  second  part,  10  open-ended  questions  were  used  in  order  to  allow  students  to 
explain  their  views  about  living  beings  and  vitality  attributes  more  thoroughly.  Consequently, 
students from the 5
th
 grade to the 8
th
 grade had difficulty in making a distinction between living 
and non-living things.  Likewise, the students called bread  yeast non-living and vitamins living. 
To students from all grades (from the 5
th
 to the 8
th
), breathing  was the first attribute associated 
with vitality. When the common features of living beings were questioned, breathing was stated 
first by students from all grades; moving was stated second by the 5
th
 and the 6
th
 grade students 
while living, reproducing, and growing were stated second by the 7
th
 and the 8
th
 grade students. 
To the students, it is a living being because it grows up. Generally, these results of in this study 
indicate that the children don’t have correct understanding and learning about living beings and 
vitality  attributes.  It  is  recommended  to  the  teachers  can  be  used  “real”  living  organisms  that 
provides a concrete and productive context for students to observe and analyze the various types 
of structures in organisms to improve concepts  living beings and vitality attributes that students 
have. 
 
Keywords: Living Beings and Vitality, Middle School Students 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
60 
 
 
 
 
E-Mentoring: Experimental Application of a Modern Model of Support oo 
Students in The Preparation, Design and Implementation of Practical Training 
 
 
Domna – Mika Kakana 
dkakana@uth.gr
 
Katiphenia  
Chatzopoulou  
Vitsou  
Magda 
Χiradaki  
Eleni 
Anastasia 
 Mavidou 
 
Contemporary changes and challenges at all levels of society and education respectively 
require  adaptations  in  the  field  of  initial  teacher  training  that  will  harmonize  with  both  the 
theoretical  and professional  training, in  order to  smoothly introduce prospective teachers in  the 
profession. According to contemporary issues in teacher education, the most effective model to 
achieve this goal is the model of the reflective teacher, the teacher as a researcher. The review of 
the curricula shows that most Pedagogical Departments of Early Education in Greece and abroad 
have  focused  on  developing  this  model.  In  the  international  literature,  teacher  education 
programs promote the model of mentor, oriented in this direction. Until 2012 in Greece, the role 
of the mentor was assigned to supervisor teachers (preschool teachers who had been working in 
the University for a specified period).  Having no further training or post graduate studies they 
had  charge  of  both  the  administrative  and  the  supervisory  duties,  a  quite  multidisciplinary 
activity which caused many difficulties. Apart from the problems described above, the economic 
crisis in Greece enforced new laws that deprived the Pedagogical Departments of the support and 
even  the  presence  of  these  teachers  in  order  to  find  more  financial  resources.  Facing  the 
ineffectiveness  and  in  efficiency  of  this  classical  non  applicable  model  of  mentor,  we  were 
forced  to  propose  an  alternative  approach.  In  this  perspective  the  case  of  e-mentoring 
(Telementoring, Cybermentoring, Virtual Mentoring), which has been used to some universities 
internationally,  is  clearly  more  applicable.  The  e-mentoring  is  defined  as  the  communication 
between  the  student  and  the  mentor,  using  the  computer  in  the  frame  of  the  Information  and 
Communications Technology (ICT), such as e-mail, chat rooms, blogs, Web conferencing, social 
media, Skype etc., solutions based on the internet and propose a new way that the mentors and 
students  interact,  communicate  and  collaborate.  The  present  study  was  motivated  by  these 
concerns  and  attempts  to  present  the  data  collected  through  questionnaires  when  the 
experimental  application  of  the  e-mentoring  model  took  place  to  support  the  students  of  the 
University  of  Thessaly,  Department  of  Early  Childhood  Education  during  their  last  academic 
year  (2014  –  2015).  The  pre  graduate  students  had  all  the  simultaneous  support  from  the  e-
mentors  in  order to prepare, design and finally implement their practical training. The research 
results  which  are  still  under  elaboration,  highlight  issues  related  to  the  improvement  of 
apprenticeship and emerge the importance of e-mentoring in initial teacher education. 
 
Keywords: E-mentoring, Pre-service teacher education, Mentor, Practical training 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
61 
 
 
 
 
The Village Institutes in Turkey as a Teacher Training Model 
 
Ebru Kubat 
ebru-kubat@hotmail.com
 
 
The  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  give  information  about  the  village  institutes  that  were 
founded in 17 April 1940, law number: 3803, which has an important role for Turkish education 
history. In this research, related documents were examined and some interviews were made with 
people  who  had  been  teachers  in  that  particular  period.  According  to  these  interviews,  the 
findings were interpreted. According to the population census in 1935, 12.355.376 people out of 
16.158.018 people lived in rural areas. About 85 percent of the population was illiterate. Also, 77 
percent  of  illiterate  people  lived  in  villages  and  towns.  This  information  can  be  determined  as 
establishment  purpose  of  the  village  institutes.  Between  1940  and  1954  in  Turkey,  the  village 
institutes, located in 21 regions, where they had large arable villages land, were away from the 
city and were close to railway stations, to train people for the village schools as teachers. Hasan 
Ali Yücel, the Minister of Education of that period and İsmail Hakkı Tonguç the primary general 
manager  pedagogue  were  very  well  aware  of  the  importance  of  the  village  institutes.  These 
institutions were adopted student centered, upstream, participatory, democratic, solidarity and art 
education.  Those  institutes  founded  by  the  “education  in  the  job!”  slogan,  the  principle  of  that 
education  was  not  detached  from  life  which  was  supported  by  modern  education  was  applied 
literally.  Children,  learning  by  practicing  and  experiencing  were  allocated  responsibility  and 
authorization in  institutes  jobs  and operations.  Therefore, individuals  who had problem  solving 
ability,  regardful,  searcher,  enactor  and  performer  grew  up.  In  addition  to  theoretical  lessons, 
they  took  lessons  such  as  applied  agriculture  lessons,  carpentry,  building,  and  fishery  and  also 
they  played  an  instrument  whatever  they  want  and  they  grew  up  nested  with  art,  reviving  the 
worldwide known plays in open-air theatres. These institutes which were established for the aim 
that  teacher  training  for  villages  to  being  a  leader  and  revive  the  village,  trained  talented 
children, who came from villages, as fully equipped. After their education, children trained other 
people in their villages.  From this point of view, the village institutes are a model for world in 
terms  of  sociologic  and  pedagogic.  And  also  they  are  an  important  invention.  Most  of  the 
population  of today's  Turkey is  in  the cities. That's  why it is  not  possible to  be rebuilt  of these 
schools but after looking over, it can be benefited from this program by converting them into city 
institutions. 
 
Keywords: The village institutes, teacher training, applied training, in the job training 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
62 
 
 
 
 
Greek Pre-Service Elementary School Teacher’s Practicum Experiences 
 
Efstathios Xafakos 
xafakos@uth.gr
 
Anastasios 
 Maratos 
Lambros  
Papadimas 
Ioanna Tsitsiriga 
 
Becoming a teacher is an ongoing process that is initiated, not completed, in the formal 
pre-service education program (Feiman-Nemser, 2001, In: Choy & Lim, 2013). Practicum is an 
integral  and a very important  part of pre-service  teachers’ education (Haigh  & Tuck, 1999), so 
each  pedagogical  department  focuses  on  their  proper  and  effective  training  and  preparation. 
Barry & King (2002, p.35 as cited in Qazi, Rawat & Thomas, 2012) noted: “Teaching practice 
(practicum)  provides  the  opportunity  to  apply  the  principles  of  teaching  and  learning  that 
students  have  studied  during  course  work”.  Those  pre-service  training  programs  that  link 
theoretical  courses  to  field  experiences  are  more  effective  than  those  which  don’t  do  this 
(National Academy of Education, 2005, In: Ünver, 2014). Many empirical studies show that pre-
service  teachers  hold  positive  attitudes  towards  practicum  and  they  face  their  practicum 
experiences  as  important and essential part for their professional  life (Zeichner  & Gore, 1990). 
Spending  time  in  classroom  is  critical  for  pre-service  teachers  to  become  successful  in-service 
teachers.  It  also  provides  the  ability  to  build  student  teachers’  self-confidence,  which  is  an 
important  factor  of  teaching  efficacy  (Ober,  2013).  The  present  study  investigates  the  Greek 
elementary  pre-service  teachers’  practicum  experiences  (from  the  Department  of  Primary 
Education  –  University  of  Thessaly).  Specifically,  this  quantitative  study  examines  the  pre-
service  teacher’s  perceptions  of  their  support,  motivations,  self-efficacy,  teaching  efficacy  and 
the  practicum  organization.  Also  this  study  examines  if  there  is  an  existing  causal  relation 
between  teaching  efficacy  and  pre-service  school  teachers’  career  decision.  Self-administered 
questionnaire were completed by 140 pre-service Greek elementary pre-service school teachers. 
The questionnaire included a Likert type scale with 62 items measuring different aspects of pre-
service teachers’ experiences (self-efficacy, teaching efficacy, motivations, tutors’ support). The 
scale was mainly based on the instruments, used by Kaldi (2009) and Fernet et al (2008). 
 
Keywords: practicum, Greek pre-service teachers, experiences 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
63 
 
 
 
 
Greek Elementary School Teachers’ Attitudes towards Educational Research in 
relation to Research Experience and Knowledge 
 
Efstathios Xafakos 
xafakos@uth.gr
 
Jasmin-Olga Sarafidou 
 
Educational  research,  as  a  practical  science,  is  an  important  part  of  the  educational 
process  and  its  use  by  teachers  can  lead  to  school  improvement  (Bell  et  al.,  2010).  Recent 
research findings indicate the need to embed educational research within school practice, as this 
is  useful both  for teachers’ work and their professional  development  (Zeichner, 2003). To this 
end the cultivation of a research culture in schools (Ebbutt, 2002; Carpenter, 2007) is needed of 
the  research  engaged  schools  (Handscomb  &  Macbeath,  2003;  Godfrey,  2014).  This  cannot  be 
realized unless school teachers hold positive attitudes towards educational research and have the 
ability  to  use  research  in  their  teaching  practice,  in  order  to  produce  “local  knowledge” 
(Stremmel,  2002).  A  number  of  studies  show  that  school  teachers  are  skeptical  about  the 
applicability  of  educational  research,  so  the  gap  between  research  and  practice  still  remains 
(Broekkamp & van – Hout Wolters, 2007; Vanderlinde & van Braak, 2010). The present study 
focuses  on  factors  associated  with  Greek  elementary  school  teachers’  attitudes  towards 
educational research. Specifically, this quantitative study investigates whether teachers’ attitudes 
are  related  to  their  training  and  experience  with  research  and  school  type.  Self-administered 
questionnaire  were  completed  by  190  primary  school  teachers.  The  questionnaire  included  a 
Likert  type  scale  with  29  items  measuring  different  aspects  of  teachers’  attitudes  towards 
educational research. The scale was mainly based on the instrument, used by Williams & Coles 
(2003). Exploratory factor analysis of the responses suggested four attitudinal components (lack 
of  knowledge  and  interest  in  educational  research,  usefulness  of  educational  research,  lack  of 
reliability  and  applicability  of  educational  research,  difficulties  in  accessing  educational 
research).  Previous  involvement  in  research  activities  was  recorded  by  40%  of  the  teachers. 
Teachers  take  some  interest  in  research  and  think  it  is  rather  useful  but  they  also  think  it  is  of 
limited  applicability.  Teachers,  who  have  a  research  experience  and  they  have  attended 
Methodology  and  Statistics  courses,  hold  more  positive  attitudes  towards  educational  research. 
Also, teachers who work in villages (small schools) take more interest in research. It is necessary 
that teachers have proper training in both reading and conducting research. Findings emphasize 
the need for both research methodology and statistics courses in teacher education, but also for 
in-service opportunities to engage with research. 
 
Keywords:  Educational  research,  Greek  elementary  school  teachers,  attitudes,  research 
experience and knowledge 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
64 
 
 
 
 
Teachers' perceptions on their in-service education 
 
Efterpi Bilimpini 
ebilimpi@edlit.auth.gr
 
 
In-service teacher education in Greece has been in the center of attention, as it is believed 
to  be  strongly  related  to  teacher  quality  and  educational  outcomes.  Policy  reforms  have 
attempted  to  define  it  as  part  of  teachers’  professionalism  and  link  it  to  their  career.  Legal 
documentation professes it to be a rightful claim of every teacher in order to improve its practice 
and seek ameliorated career prospects. Nevertheless, research has shown that the way in-service 
education is designed and materialized has failed to emancipate the professionals and render the 
desired results. On the contrary, recent legal framework seems to be ignoring research findings 
and  motivational  theories  that  apply  to  the  teaching  profession  and  their  commitment  to  the 
educational  goals,  focusing  mainly  on  fully  regulating  the  institution  and  linking  in-service 
education  to  incentive  policy  theories  as  well  as  pay  related  performance  skills,  earmarking  in 
that  way  in-service  teacher  education  as  an  obligation  conforming  to  extrinsic  motivation,  not 
inherent to teachers’ values and attitudes. Moreover, the teachers seem to be excluded from the 
discussion,  as  they  do  not  participate  in  decision-making  related  to  their  in-service  education. 
The implications of this are multiple affecting their professionalism and consequently the quality 
of their teaching. The aim of this paper is to present the findings of a national survey on teachers’ 
opinions and perceptions about the in-service education they receive as well as discern whether 
they  believe  that  this  education  focuses  on  the  promotion  of  their  professional  development. 
Another aspect researched was whether this education forms a part of their professional identity. 
An extensive questionnaire was sent to secondary school teachers practicing the profession in all 
geographical  areas.  The  teachers  were  of  all  age  groups  and  teach  all  subjects,  they  have 
followed  different  routes  into  the  profession  and  had  received  different  forms  of  in-service 
education  prior  to  participating  in  the  survey.  The  questions  to  be  answered  were  mainly  of  a 
quantitative nature and had to do with various aspects of the in-service education they received 
from  the  moment  they  entered  the  profession  and  throughout  their  career.  The  findings  are 
interesting  and  verify  to  a  point  what  has  been  ascertained  in  previous  researches  that  Greek 
teachers  value  their  in-service  education.  They  do  not  seem  to  believe  that  their  in-service 
education promotes their professional identity.  In that way, a gap between policy aspirations and 
actual results seems to be created in need of further research and discussion. 
 
Keywords:  in-service  education,  teachers'  professionalism,  teachers'  commitment,  motivational 
theories 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
65 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling