Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet7/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   25

Continuing Professional Development in Time of Crisis: Greek Early Childhood 
Educators' Perspectives 
 
Athanasios Gregoriadis 
asis@nured.auth.gr
 
Maria Birbili 
Maria Papandreou 
 
The  need  for  the  present  study  has  arisen  from  recent  changes  in  the  professional 
development  of  Greek  early  childhood  teachers.  It  was  also  based  on  the  realization  that  the 
economic  crisis  in  Greece  calls  not  only  for  more  cost-effective  approaches  to  teacher 
professional  development  but  also  for  policies  that  encourage  life-long  learning  and  skill 
development.  More  specifically,  the  study  set  out  to  “capture”  early  childhood  teachers’ 
perspectives  about  professional  development,  during  the  time  of  the  abolishment  of 
“Didaskalio”,  a  university-based  professional  development  program  that  has  been  in  place  for 
more than 90  years. The teachers who participated in the study were the last ‘graduates’ of the 
‘Didaskalio’  of  the  Department  of  Early  Childhood  Education  at  Aristotle  University  of 
Thessaloniki,  which  ended  officially  in  2012.  Data  were  collected  using  a  semi-structured 
questionnaire  given  to  45  participants.  All  participants  were  women  with  their  teaching 
experience ranging from 6 to 20 years. Teachers were asked about the quality of the training they 
had  experienced,  what  professional  development  meant  to  them  and  their  perception  of  CPD 
activities. Data analysis showed that for the teachers of the study professional development was 
still  equated  primarily  with  structured  courses  and/or  programs  run  by  “official”  educational 
institutions or bodies. This kind of professional development practice seems to satisfy teachers’ 
expressed  need  a)  to  have  their  training  certified  by  a  ‘formal’,  ‘recognized’,  ‘respected’, 
‘organized’ provider and b) for formalized knowledge. Although alternative models of CPD, like 
on-line  training,  sharing  good  practice  and  whole-school  development  events  are  not  rejected 
they are not  as  popular as  institution-based expertise. Teachers’ preferences  seem  to  be closely 
linked not only to their professional development experiences until the time of the study but also 
to  the  way  they  define  professional  development.  According  to  the  participants,  professional 
development is mainly about ‘learning what’s new’: New knowledge, new developments in the 
field  of  early  childhood  education,  new  practices  and  teaching  strategies.  The  second  most 
reported definition reveals teachers’ perception of professional development as a process which 
improves  one’s  professional  career  and/or  prospects.  An  interesting  finding  related  to  their 
definition  of  professional  development  is  the  small  number  of  teachers  who  link  professional 
development experiences directly to student learning. The paper will discuss the implications of 
the  findings  in  light  of  the  current  economic  and  social  circumstances  facing  Greek  education 
and suggest directions for future action both for policy makers and universities. 
 
Keywords:  Early  childhood  education,  continuing  professional  development,  professional 
learning, teachers training 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
36 
 
 
 
 
Using Webinars in Lifelong Learning Programs: A Literature Review 
  
Athanasios Sypsas 
sipsas@gmail.com
 
Jenny Pange 
 
The  extended  use  of  ICT  in  all  stages  of  educational  process  empowers  E-learning  to 
offer  innovative  educational  programs  in  new,  engaging  and  finally  effective  ways  to 
heterogeneous learners. Webinars are one of the latest tools used in e-learning. A Webinar is a 
web-based seminar, conference or presentation.  It provides  an interactive  environment  to  share 
information  and  receive  feedback  from  audience  without  place  restrictions.  It,  also,  offers  the 
ability  to  transmit  video  and  audio  simultaneously  enabling  users  to  share  applications,  using 
whiteboard,  communicating  and  finally  supporting  the  collaboration  between  the  presenter  and 
the audience. Additionally, the webinars can be recorded and viewed in later time. The lifelong 
learning  programs  are  using  the  expansion  of  ICT  and  the  growing  availability  of  information 
sources. Many of these programs adopt the available learning sources (Webinars, MOOCs, etc.). 
Lifelong  learning  programs  use  the  Webinars  increasingly,  as  their  learning  advantages  are 
acknowledged.  According  to  resent  studies,  webinars  are  used  in  combination  with  traditional 
traineeships,  professional  conferences,  community  education  courses,  and  workplace  training, 
during lifelong learning  programs.  In lifelong learning programs  about  teacher information and 
communication  competence  development,  one  of  the  main  strategies  was  the  conduction  of 
webinars.  Lifelong  learning  is  used  to  educate  various  audience  groups  in  health  professions, 
because  of  the  continuous  evolution  in  this  sector.  Thus,  webinars  are  used  in  such  lifelong 
learning  programs.  Other  studies  revealed  that  users  in  lifelong  learning  programs  concerning 
digital  curation,  had  a  preference  for  webinars,  among  other  tools  (social  networks,  MOOCs, 
etc.), as they were no-cost solutions. Moreover, Webinars were chosen, among other tools, to be 
used  in  continuing  education  programs  for  social  workers  from  different  geographical  areas. 
Lifelong  learning  programs,  concerning  forestry  education,  adopted  webinars  as  a  solution  for 
the spatially distributed learners. Conclusively, the results of the aforementioned studies showed 
that  participants  in  lifelong  learning  programs  expressed  a  preference  for  programs  using 
webinars among other tools, since they facilitated the distant participation in such programs. The 
purpose of this study is to present the educational uses of Webinars in various lifelong learning 
programs in order to support educators to use Webinars. 
 
Keywords: E-learning, Webinars, Lifelong Learning 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
37 
 
 
 
 
Comparing Three Instruments for Assessing Teachers' Burnout: MBI, BM and 
CBI 
 
Athina Daniilidou 
            
 athina51089@gmail.com
 
Maria Platsidou 
 
Several  studies  conducted  in  the  last  decade  to  assess  burnout  of  Greek  primary  school 
teachers showed that, according to their self-reports, they experienced lower levels of burnout in 
comparison to their peers in Western European and Northern American countries. (Aventisian–
Pagoropoulou, Koumpias, & Giavrimis, 2002· Kantas. 1996· Papastylianou & Polyxronopoulos, 
2007·  Platsidou  &  Agaliotis,  2008).  Most  relevant  studies  have  used  the  Maslach’s  Burnout 
Inventory  (MBI,  Maslach  &  Jackson,  1982)  to  measure  teachers'  burnout.  This  fact  raised  the 
question whether the low burnout of Greek teachers is attributed to the MBI measurement. The 
study  aimed  at  comparing  measurements  of  burnout  of  Greek  primary  education  teachers 
(N=320) obtained by three burnout instruments which reflected different theoretical approaches: 
the  MBI  (Maslach  et  al.,  1996),  the  Burnout  Measure  (BM,  Pines  &  Aronson,  1988),  and  the 
Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI, Kristensen et al., 2005). The last two scales were used for 
the first time in Greek. Also, job satisfaction was used as a criterion variable and assessed using 
the Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS, Warr, Cook & Wall, 1979). More specifically, the study aimed at 
(1)  testing  the  internal  structure  (factorial  validity)  and  reliability  of  the  aforementioned 
instruments and (2) exploring the relations among the different burnout measures obtained by the 
three  instruments  (convergent  validity).  Confirmatory  factors  analyses  performed  in  three 
burnout instruments confirmed their factorial validity, although some reservations were noted for 
the CBI. All subscales were found to have good reliability indexes. CFA performed on the JSS 
did not confirm the two-factor model tested, so a score reflecting teachers' global job satisfaction 
was  computed  (α  =  .87).  Consistent  with  prior  studies  of  Greek  primary  school  teachers, 
participants  reported  moderate  burnout  in  all  measures  and  moderately  high  satisfaction  with 
their  job.  Correlations  between  the  instruments  were  found  to  largely  confirm  the  hypotheses, 
thus  supporting  convergent  validity  of  the  scales,  with  one  exception:  MB-physical  exhaustion 
does not correlate significantly to depersonalization. Overall, the CBI subscales correlated higher 
with  the  other  burnout  measures  as  well  as  the  JSS  than  the  MBI  or  the  MB  subscales  did. 
Results of the present study are discussed in relation to the previous findings of relevant Greek 
and  international  studies.  Also,  the  strong  and  the  weak  points  of  each  of  the  three  burnout 
instruments used in the study are identified and discussed. 
 
Keywords:  Burnout,  Job  Satisfaction,  Teachers,  Greek,  Maslach  Burnout  Inventory,  Burnout 
Measure, Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
38 
 
 
 
 
Learning Experiences Leave Their Mark on Pre-Service Teachers 
 
Aysun Erginer 
aysunerginer@nevsehir.edu.tr
 
Ergin Erginer 
Tuba Acar Erdol 
 
The purpose of the study is to identify what types of learning experiences have the most 
impact  on  pre-service  teachers.  The  study  was  designed  as  a  case  study,  and  the  sample  was 
comprised of 748 pre-service teachers. The researchers devised a data collection tool containing 
items  related  to  the  gender  of  the  pre-service  teacher;  the  gender,  discipline,  and  professional 
experience of his/her teacher; the grade, place, and time in which the incident took place; and the 
peculiarities  and  effects  of  what  the  pre-service  teacher  experienced.  The  pre-service  teachers 
uploaded  the  data  to  the  measuring  instrument  that  the  researchers  had  identified  on  Google 
Drive.  The  data  were  on  the  pre-service  teachers  registered  for  the  Pedagogical  Formation 
Certificate Program offered by Nevsehir Haci Bektas Veli University during the Spring Term of 
the 2013-2014 Academic Year. These data were then subjected to a descriptive content analysis. 
The  preliminary  findings  suggested  that  students  were  more  often  affected  by  negative 
experiences, though they also had their share of positive experiences. Teachers try to establish a 
culture of obedience and fear, largely through the use of corporal punishment, insulting language 
and humiliation, and they imposed degrading punishments to ensure and maintain discipline. In 
addition,  they  exhibit  behavior  that  is  intolerant,  biased,  discriminatory,  threatening, 
incriminating,  distracting  and  discouraging.  Their  behavior  is  characterized  by  lack  of  self-
control  and  echoes  their  private  life,  resulting  in  negative  influences  on  student  achievement. 
They  also  appear  to  lack  the  academic  knowledge  and  skills  required  for  the  practice  of  their 
profession. Attempts to discipline students through punishment lead students to feel themselves 
insufficient.  Teachers’  use  of  physical  violence  following  wrong  answers  by  students  to  any 
given question leads the latter to adopt negative habits throughout the course of their educational 
life, including their reluctance to take the floor, express their ideas, speak in public and go to the 
blackboard.  According  to  the  pre-service  teachers,  such  experiences  make  them  lack  self-
confidence and alienate them from the school, the course and the teacher. The responses by some 
of  the  pre-service  teachers  indicate  that  teachers  come  to  school  drunk  and  in  inappropriate 
clothes  and  are  incited  to  buy  alcohol.  Owing  to  undesirable  teacher  behavior,  students  might 
suffer  from  physical  and  psychological  harm,  and  disagreements  and  factions  can  emerge  at 
school or in the classroom; some students might even drop out or attempt suicide. 
 
Keywords: Teacher education, learning experiences, case study. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
39 
 
 
 
 
Positive Psychology of Teachers 
 
Bahar Çağrı Şan 
baharsan@gmail.com
 
Türkay Nuri Tok 
 
Organizational commitment has become one of the essential needs of the modern world. 
Bayram  (2005)  defines  organizational  commitment  as  loyalty  behavior  of  a  worker  for  an 
organization and showing interest to make the organization successful. Balay (2000) defines the 
importance  of  organizational  commitment  for  organizations  as  dismissal,  job  satisfaction, 
responsibility,  personality  of  the  workers,  knowing  organizational  commitment  breakers  that 
individuals possess. Work engagement increases in situations that organizational commitment is 
strong  and workers  are  devoted to  their job.  Nowadays  many  studies  about  education focus  on 
factors  that  highlight  the  negative  parts  of  employees.  Fatigue,  stress  and  conflict  are  example 
concepts  of  these  studies.  Work  engagement  is  characterized  just  the  opposite  meaning  of 
fatigue. Many synonym words are used for the meaning of Work engagement. Work engagement 
increases in situations that organizational commitment is strong and workers are devoted to their 
job. Esen (2011) defines work engagement as worker's desire, excited and energetic approach for 
organization. Esen (2011) emphasizes that individuals  that have strong work engagement work 
voluntarily, hard, in  long  periods and make  efforts  much above their performance to  live up to 
the aims  of the organization.  Ardıç and Polatcı  (2009) express  that there is "energy"  instead of 
emotional exhaustion, "sense of belonging" instead of desensitization and "proficiency" instead 
of  low  personal  success  that  emerge  in  exhaustion  situations  of  work  engagement.  Ardıç  and 
Polatcı (2009) analyze the work engagement strategies in as individual and commitment levels. 
The  strategies  of  work  engagement  on  commitment  level  are  both  more  permanent  than 
individual  level  and  reinforce  the  idea  of  fatigue  is  an  important  problem  in  organization  and 
should  be  prevented.  The  strategies  of  work  engagement  on  individual  level  are  consisted  of 
increasing  individual  sources  by  changing  the  employees’  position,  developing  solutions  or 
solutions  that  change  the  attitudes  of  employees  towards  their  work.  The  objective  of  the 
research  is  to  examine  work  engagement  levels  of  teachers  in  terms  of  demographic  variables. 
Database  group  of  the  research  is  comprised  of  294  teachers  who  worked  in  Denizli  province 
Kale  country  in  between  2014  and  2015.  To  collect  data  during  research,  Allen  Mayer’s 
Organizational  Commitment  Utrect  Work  Engagement  Scale  is  used  (UWES).  Currently  the 
research is in the process of data collecting. At the end of the study, the data will be analyzed by 
SPSS 16.0 program. The analysis of the study is still going on. Therefore, the finding, results and 
discussion sections haven’t been completed yet. 
 
Keywords:  Organization,  Organizational  Commitment,  Work  Engagement,  Demographic 
Variables 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
40 
 
 
 
 
Prospective Teachers’ Beliefs about Teaching Mathematics Through Tasks 
 
Bilge Yurekli 
bilgeyurekli@gazi.edu.tr
 
Mine Isiksal-Bostan 
 
Reform-oriented  mathematics  teaching  requires  teaching  mathematics  through  tasks,  in 
order to support the development of students’ mathematics learning with  an understanding and 
their higher-order thinking skills. Teacher beliefs, as a strong determinant of teaching practices, 
influence  the  effectiveness  of  mathematics  teaching  through  tasks.  Therefore,  it  is  the 
responsibility of teacher education programs to help future teachers establish strong and positive 
beliefs  related  to  using  tasks  in  mathematics  classrooms.  The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to 
examine the power of a mathematics teaching methods course focusing on teaching mathematics 
through tasks  in  order to  contribute to  the development of prospective teachers’ beliefs.  In this 
qualitative  case  study,  9  prospective  teachers  enrolled  in  Elementary  Mathematics  Education 
program  at  a  large  public  university  in  Ankara,  Turkey  were  interviewed  after  completing  a 
mathematics  teaching  methods  course.  Findings  showed  that  methods  course  had  the  major 
impact  on  participants’  beliefs,  since,  as  students  of  traditional  classrooms,  their  previous 
experiences with mathematical tasks were limited. Participants stated that in methods class they 
were  introduced  to  mathematical  tasks  for  the  first  time.  Thus,  they  believed  methods  course 
should have been offered earlier than third year in the program so as to provide them with more 
opportunities to learn and practice using mathematical tasks. In general, the influence of methods 
course  was  mainly  positive,  and  at  the  end  of  the  methods  course,  participants  believed  that 
through mathematical tasks, students could learn mathematics with an understanding, instead of 
memorizing  procedures  and  rules;  overcome  misconceptions;  be  responsible  for  their  own 
learning;  feel  confident  about  their  capabilities;  and  finally  enjoy  learning  mathematics.  Their 
beliefs about disadvantages of tasks were that using mathematical tasks could be time consuming 
and cause classroom management issues. As a result, prospective teachers believed that teaching 
mathematics  only  through  tasks  was  not  possible,  that  teachers  should  integrate  both 
mathematical tasks and traditional methods in their teaching. 
 
Keywords: mathematical tasks, prospective teachers, beliefs 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
41 
 
 
 
 
Using Children Drawings as a Reflective Technique: Example Of Artist Concept 
 
Burçin Türkcan 
burcint@anadolu.edu.tr
 
 
Executing educational activities efficiently is based on the teacher’s professional quality 
to  a  large  extent.  Teachers  not  only  have  responsibilities  such  as  regulating  the  settings  in  the 
classroom,  making  plans  and  servicing  an  efficient  teaching,  but  also  recognizing  and  guiding 
the  students  effectively.  One  of  the  techniques  that  can  be  used  by  teachers  to  recognize  the 
students  is  children  drawings.  It  is  because  children  intimately  reflect  the  perceptions  of  their 
inner  world  and  their  environment.  Perception  which  is  formed  by  combining  both  individual 
experiences  and  meanings  given  to  cultural  codes  constitutes  creating  the  impression  of  the 
environment through the senses of the individual and the process of reacting to the environment 
by  created  meanings.  As  a  reflective  technique,  children  drawings  are  a  language  by  which 
children can express  their perception and meaning systems  intimately. Specifying what  kind  of 
perception  a  student  has  on  various  issues  helps  the  teachers  recognize  their  students  better. 
Because  of  this,  in  the  study,  analyzing  the  meanings  that  children  give  to  a  concept  and  the 
clues given to teachers by using what kind of perceptions that children have at their inner worlds 
is  exemplified  through  a  concept  selected.  We  choose  a  sample  concept,  whose  integrity  of 
meaning  has  been  changed  by  the  multiple  stimulants  of  today’s  world  which  consists  of 
communication, media and technology-intensive life. As the emphasis of postmodern era on the 
visuals  has  increased,  singularism  has  taken  the  place  of  pluralism  and  the  concepts  of  art 
through the influence of popular culture have changed, we have chosen the “artist” concept. The 
purpose of this research is to present primary school students' perceptions about the concept of 
artist.  The  study  was  conducted  with  art-based  research  method.  Sampling  criteria  was  used  to 
determine  the  sampling  criteria  and  103  students  from  lower  socio-economic  and  upper  socio-
economic  schools  participated  in  the  study.  For  the  collection  of  research  data,  the  document 
analysis of the pictures that the students drew and the structured interviews by which the students 
expressed  their  opinions  about  these  pictures  were  used.  The  data  obtained  were  analyzed 
through  descriptive  analysis.  According  to  the  findings,  it  was  found  out  that  primary  school 
students  mostly  perceived  artist  concept  as  pop  music  artists  or  artists  who  drew  a  picture  in 
front  of  the  canvas.  While  the  students  from  upper  socio-economic  schools  associated  artist 
concept to pop music artists, a significant proportion of the students from lower socio-economic 
schools associated artist concept to painters. Based on these findings, in the research, the impacts 
of  popular  culture  on  varied  socio-economic  status  students  were  discussed  and  the 
diversification of diagnostic techniques used by teachers was exemplified. 
 
Keywords: Primary school, children drawings, perception, artist, popular culture. 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
42 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling