Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet4/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25

 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
11 
 
 
 
 
International Educational Discourse on Teacher’ Performance: Between Global 
Doctrines and Personal Postulates 
 
Alexandra-Styliani Karagianni 
alexandrakaragianni@gmail.com
 
Aristotelis Zmas 
 
International  organizations,  such  as  European  Union,  World  Bank  and  OECD,  promote 
teacher policy agendas globally. Their agendas focus on identifying what constitutes the profile 
of an ‘effective’ teacher in the era of knowledge-based societies. This development challenges 
the traditional position which suggests that teacher policy agendas are shaped only in the frame-
work  of  national  and  local  contexts.  The  present  paper  argues  that  the  diffusion  of  the 
international discourse regarding teachers’ performance is a complex process. As this discourse 
flows  across  countries,  it  interacts,  amongst  others,  with  existing  policy  visions,  cultural 
traditions and the personal beliefs of teachers, whose priorities may differ from those manifest in 
the equivalent inter-national ‘doctrines’ about teachers’ performance. This argument is discussed 
by  focusing  on  the  views  of  fifteen  Greek  teachers  who  worked  in  primary  schools  during  the 
years 2013 and 2014. The paper examines whether the teachers, who were interviewed, adopted 
basic  principles  and  values  permeating  the  international  discourse  on  teachers’  professional 
performance. According to the research, teachers are not sufficiently aware of the role of inter-
national  organizations  as  significant  players  in  the  transnational  arena  of  educational  policy 
making.  Furthermore,  they  express  their  reservations  about  the  development  of  cross-national 
standards relating to their work. However, teachers recognize the importance of some proposals 
that  international  organizations  make  regarding  the  desired  requirements  for  their  professional 
performance. They realize, for instance, the complexity of their work, accepting the necessity for 
lifelong learning for their professional development. 
 
Keywords:  international  organizations,  educational  discourse,  teachers’  performance,  personal 
postulates 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
12 
 
 
 
 
Rethinking Teacher Education: The Case of the EFL Primary School Teachers 
CoP in Delta School District of Athens 
 
Alexia Giannakopoulou 
alexiagiannakopoulou@gmail.com
 
 
This  paper  examines  the  effectiveness  of  teacher  professional  development  through 
participation in an online Community of Practice (CoP). The specific CoP is a group of English 
primary school teachers in Delta School District of Athens who wish to deepen their knowledge 
and practice on a specific topic, that of Differentiated Instruction (DI). The paper will attempt to 
throw  light  on  how  the  teachers  become  more  expert  through  participation  in  this  learning 
environment.  It  will  present  the  development  of  the  specific  CoP,  assess  its  effectiveness  as  a 
teacher  education  tool,  investigate  the  nature  of  the  activities  carried  out  by  the  active  CoP 
members,  and  their  interactions  (both  trainer-trainee  and  peer-peer  interactions)  during  a  six-
month  period.  The  measure  of  the  impact  of  participating  in  a  CoP  on  individuals  and 
organization (school) will take place in three areas: a) nature of activity (types of tasks, relevance 
of  activities  to  the  CoP’s  aims),  b)  quality  of  interactions  (quality  of  responses,  quality  of 
outputs, types of feedback by expert and peers) c) level of motivation and engagement (number 
of  members  involved  in  discussion,  number  of  posts,  length  of  posts  and  threads),  attitudes 
(expansion  of  knowledge  based  on  trainees’  perceptions,  potential  and  applied  value  based  on 
trainees’  perceptions,  feelings  of  belonging,  feelings  of  identity,  attitudes  towards  this  kind  of 
teacher  professional  development  tool).  The  data  will  be  harvested  from  questionnaires,  semi-
structured interviews with teachers, direct observation (based on the trainer) and the analysis of 
the  members’  outputs/contributions.  The  paper  will  also  give  an  overview  of  recent 
developments  linked to  CoPs  with  a focus  on  a  social-cognitive and a knowledge-management 
perspective.  What  this  paper  aims  to  contribute  is  an  enhanced  understanding  of  this  model  of 
teacher  professional  development  and  evaluation  concerning  expansion  of  knowledge,  social 
interaction and the formation of metalinguistic awareness in language teaching. 
 
Keywords: Teacher education, online Communities of Practice 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
13 
 
 
 
 
Investigation of the Development Process of Qualitative Researcher 
Competences of PhD Students as Teacher Educators 
 
Ali Ersoy 
alersoy@anadolu.edu.tr
 
 
As  teacher  educators  at  the  beginning  of  their  careers,  doctoral  students  prepare 
themselves  not  only  for  academic  life  but  for  professional  one  as  well.  In  this  sense,  doctoral 
students  are  expected  to  achieve  generic  competence  and  scientific  competence  at  the  highest 
level. Generic competence involves everyday communication, cognitive and interpersonal skills 
while scientific competence deals with skills related to academic life such as academic writing, 
research  methodology,  making  presentations,  and  creating  conceptual  and  theoretical 
frameworks. As a prospective faculty member/researcher, the capacity of a doctoral student both 
to  conduct  more  quality  research  and  to  equip  their  students  with  research  methodology 
competence is closely related to the nature of their own experience about acquiring generic and 
scientific competence during their doctoral education. Therefore, in doctoral programs, students 
should  be  offered  opportunities  to  improve  their  scientific  competence  in  particular.  These 
opportunities might include research methodology courses offered in a doctoral degree program 
based  on  quantitative,  qualitative  and  mixed-method  paradigms,  pilot  study  experiences  within 
these  courses,  and  activities  such  as  giving  presentations  about  academic  or  course  studies.  In 
this way, doctoral students can actively gain scientific competence through hands-on experience 
and  with  an  integration  of  theory  and  practice.  This  is  a  case  study  that  aims  to  explore  the 
development process of qualitative research competences of doctoral students. The study is being 
conducted with 10 doctoral students doing a qualitative research methods course in educational 
sciences  field  for  the  first  time.  The  course  is  designed  as  14  weeks  of  project-based  work  in 
which students theoretically learn about  and discuss the essentials of qualitative research, basic 
qualitative  research  designs  and  data  collection  and  analysis  techniques,  they  conduct 
observations and interviews based on qualitative design by which they can apply the theory into 
practice,  and  they  review  articles.  The  course  topics  are  extended  through  discussions  on 
Facebook,  the  reading  materials  and  students’  interview  questions  and  journals  are  shared  on 
Facebook, and guest speakers with expertise on qualitative research are invited to lessons from 
time  to  time.  Facebook  is  effectively  used  as  a  peer-mentoring  meeting  environment.  Data  are 
collected  using  individual  reflective  journals,  semi-structured  interviews,  Facebook  discussion 
scripts  and  student  self-assessment  reports.  The  primary  data  analysis  method  is  a  thematic 
analysis technique. The qualitative research methods course and data collection process are still 
in progress. 
 
Keywords: PhD Students, Qualitative Researcher Competences, Teacher Educators 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
14 
 
 
 
 
Teacher Educators’ Preparedness for the New Trends in Teacher Education: 
Experiences from Kyambogo and Makerere Universities, Uganda 
 
Alice Merab Kagoda 
musano2009@gmail.com
 
Betty Akullu Ezati 
 
Teacher quality has been shown to  be the “single most important” variable influencing 
student achievements (Vespoor 2008, p.217). Teachers’ qualification and experience, knowledge 
of  subject  areas  and  pedagogical  skills  influence  student  learning  in  profound  ways 
(Vavrus,Thomas and Barlett 2011). Improving quality of instruction depends to a large extent on 
pedagogical training and support provided to teachers during training. Teacher educators have a 
key  role to  play in  helping teacher trainees  develop  the knowledge  and skills  necessary for the 
21
st
  century.  However,  teacher  educators  are  not  often  specifically  trained  as  teacher  educators 
since  it  is  assumed  that  anyone  graduating  with  an  education  certificate  would  be  capable  of 
teaching  at  the  University.    Using  data  collected  from  teacher  educators  at  Makerere  and 
Kyambogo Universities, this paper analyses teacher educators’ preparedness to support teacher 
trainees  to  acquire to  acquire 21
st
  century skills.  Findings  reveal  that 21
st
  century skills  are not 
passed  on  to  teacher  trainees  in  the  two  institutions,  specifically  students  graduate  without 
knowledge and skills in the following skills; information and  ICT literacy, information literacy, 
community  based  education,  project-based  investigations,  safe  and  trusting  learning,  system 
based  learning,  reflection  on  instructional  issues,  accountability,  personal  productivity, 
adaptability,  among  others.  The  researchers  conclude  that  teacher  educators  are  not  adequately 
preparing teachers for the 21
st
 century. This, in turn, makes it difficult for teachers to adapt and 
adopt to the fast changing information landscape. 
 
Keywords: 21st century knowledge, skills, values and attitudes, teacher educators and new trends 
in teacher education 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
15 
 
 
 
 
WebQuests as a Training Technique of in-Service Teachers 
 
Anastasia Fakidou 
afakidou@uth.gr
 
Maria Gotzia 
 
Our  study  concerns  a  proposal  for  the  training  of  in-service  teachers  utilizing  the 
structured  formula  of  WebQuests  as  an  active,  collaborative  training  technique  that  develops 
research skills, empowers teachers, promotes their professional development and shapes actively 
their teacher-identity. It could be used during in situ or distance learning. The theoretical context 
involves  principals  of  the  training  archetype  about  the  three  conceptions  of  teacher  knowledge 
and  learning,  the  Mezirow’s  theory  of  Transformative  Learning,  the  application  of  new 
technologies  (ICT)  as  a  method  of  training,  and  the  working  methodology  of  WebQuests.  A 
scheme  of  work  of  a  training  program  on  a  specific  theme  is  presented  as  a  template  of  the 
training  technique.  Its  aim  is  the  development  of  teachers’  skills  to  integrate  ICT  to  teach 
concepts  or  themes  via  the  WebQuest  learning  environment  –namely,  they  are  trained  about 
WebQuest teaching practices by WebQuestioning. The program begins with the discussion of a 
disorienting dilemma, critical reflections on assumptions for the benefits/problems of Internet’s 
usage  and  self-examination  of  feelings  for  the  ICT  usage  in  class.  Tasks  refer  to  colleagues’ 
education in an intrascholastic context by the teachers who have developed expertise due to their 
participation to the program, and the designing, self-assessment and peer-assessment of a project 
based  on  WebQuest  in  a  discipline  of  their  choice.  All  training  activities  are  cooperative, 
experiential,  structured  around  problem  solving  and  project-based  inquiry.  They  involve  the 
study of internet resources–information retrieved from websites, the analysis and assessment of a 
project  available  in  a  database-  and  their  elaboration  by  digital  tools  (Word  Processor,  Power 
Point  presentation,  Inspiration/Kidspiration  software),  given  strategies  (concept  maps,  data 
assembling  tables,  assessments  check  lists),  role-play  (ICT  skeptic/ICT  enthusiastic)  and 
simulation  of  a  intrascholastic  training  context.  At  the  end,  teachers  reflect  on  their  previous 
assumptions and on the new discoveries and events that influenced this transformation. Finally, 
they  create  a  supportive  on  line  learning  community  for  further  study  and  interaction  in  an 
interscholastic context. Tasks and activities are organized and presented according to WebQuest 
formula by the teachers’ educator. S/he is facilitator or change agent, transfers authority to the 
teachers, encourages reflection, motivation. S/he promotes social interaction, so as they could re-
craft professional identities as members of a team of practitioners. 
 
Keywords: Transformative Learning, experiential learning, WebQuest structure, in situ/distance 
training, in-service teachers 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
16 
 
 
 
 
Myths and Stereotypes in Language Teaching and How to Help English and 
Greek School Teachers to Dispel Them 
 
Anastasia Georgountzou 
anny_ph@yahoo.com
 
Natasha Tsantila 
 
The various social, political and economic changes that have taken place in most parts of 
the world over the last century have dramatically affected all scientific disciplines. In reference 
to the teaching profession, globalization has played a catalytic role enabling teachers of the first 
and  second/foreign  language(s)  to  reconsider  and  modify  their  teaching  practices  in  order  to 
better  respond  to  the  needs  of  their  multilingual  and  multicultural  teaching  contexts.  The 
unprecedented  spread  that  the  English  language  has  undergone  during  the  last  decades  as  a 
widely  and  -  in  most  cases  -  almost  exclusively  used  transactional,  contact  language  has  led 
English  instructors  and  educators  to  a  'reconceptualization'  (Seidlhofer,  2011)  of  their  hitherto 
approaches  and  teaching  methods.  In  this  respect,  well  known  dichotomies  such  as  'native 
speaker'  vs  'non-native  speaker',  'learner'  vs  'user'  (Cook,  2000)  and  'target  language'  vs 
'interlanguage' were highly questioned (Firth & Wagner, 1997) and, as a result, new tendencies 
in English language teaching have emerged pinpointing a non-monolithic, non- norm dependent 
approach  and  the  necessity  to  expose  learners  to  multiple  varieties  of  the  English  language  so 
that  they  can  be  better  equipped  to  communicate  with  native  and  non-native  English  speakers. 
The traditional approach favoring a standardized, homogeneous form of a model language to be 
imposed  over  linguistic  varieties  also  begs  rethinking  in  the  Greek  setting  since  the  latter  is 
becoming  increasingly  multicultural  nowadays  given  the  influx  of  a  big  number  of  economic 
immigrants  who  are  currently  working  and  raising  their  families  in  Greece.  By  drawing  on 
experimental  data  of  spoken  speech  obtained  from  Greek  native  speakers  of  English  who  are 
learning  Modern  Greek  and  English,  the  present  paper  aims  at  underlining  the  need  to  educate 
pre-service  and  in-service  teachers  of  the  above  two  languages  in  order  to  liberate  themselves 
from clinging to a single, norm dependent language variety and acquire multicultural awareness 
(Issari,  2006)  by  realizing  the  need  to  apply  a  pluralistic  (Jenkins,  2006)  and 
egalitarian'(Canagarajah,  1999)  approach  to  language  learning  according  to  which  language 
varieties  should  not  be  underestimated  and  stigmatized  but  encouraged  in  the  language 
classroom  as  they  effectively  contribute  to  attaining  interlanguage  and  intercultural 
communicative competence. 
Keywords:  first,  second/foreign  language  learning,  native  vs  non-native  language  user,  norm 
dependent variety, language pluralism, intercultural awareness. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
17 
 
 
 
 
Classroom Management Techniques: Views of Primary School Teachers in 
Greece 
 
Anastasia Papanastasiou 
natasa_papanastasiou@hotmail.gr
 
 
This  research  aims  to  highlight  how  teachers  of  primary  education  in  Greece  run  their 
classroom  as  well  as  the  techniques  they  use  most  commonly  in  classroom  management. 
Moreover,  the  positions  of  the  teachers  towards  their  cooperation  with  the  school  environment 
(colleagues  and  school  principal)  and  the  students’  parents  are  being  investigated.  The 
standardized  questionnaire  «Teacher  Classroom  Management  Strategies  Questionnaire»  was 
used for this research. The survey involved a total of 95 teachers from the counties of Magnesia, 
Trikala  and  Thessaloniki  both  from  urban  and  non-urban  areas.  The  findings  indicated  that 
teachers had great confidence in their ability to manage problems in the classroom. Furthermore, 
it  was  found  that  the  frequency  of  use  of  the  techniques,  concerning  classroom  management, 
agreed with their utility. 
 
Keywords: classroom management, Greece, teachers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
18 
 
 
 
 
Professional Identity in Early Childhood Care and Education in Greece: 
Perspectives of Student Teachers 
Anastasia Psalti 
psalti.anastasia@gmail.com
 
 
Becoming  a  teacher  –that  is,  developing  a  teaching  identity  -  is  a  complex  process  that 
takes place in specific context overtime and involves knowledge, skills, and values required and 
practiced within the profession. This process begins quite early, even before the student teachers 
attend the first lecture in their undergraduate studies. They bring with them their personal beliefs 
about teaching which have been shaped by their own schooling experiences and continue to be 
influenced  by  the  teacher  preparation  program  they  undergo.  Early  childhood  education  in 
Greece is offered in Pre-primary schools (Nipiagogeia) under the competence of the Ministry of 
Education  and  Religious  Affairs  and  in  Child  (Paidikoi  Stathmoi)  and  Infant/Child  Centers 
(Vrefonipiakoi  Stathmoi)  under  the  auspices  of  Municipalities  as  well  as  in  respective  private 
pre-school education centers (Eurydice, 2010). Teachers for the Pre-primary schools are trained 
in the Departments of Early Childhood Education in universities and teachers for the Child and 
Infant/Child  Centers  are  trained  in  the  Departments  of  Early  Childhood  Care  and  Education  in 
Technological  Educational  Institutions.  In  2013  the  Greek  Ministry  of  Education  changed  the 
titles  of  the  Departments  of  Early  Childhood  Care  and  Education  of  the  Technological 
Educational  Institutions into the Departments of Early Childhood Education without modifying 
the professional rights of their graduates. This change and the confusion it has created along with 
the  growing  interest  worldwide  in  Early  Childhood  Education  may  have  had  an  impact  on  the 
professional identity of the students in these Departments. Using a qualitative methodology, this 
study  attempts  to  garner  personal  perspectives  and  insights  into  the  developing  professional 
identity  of  the  student  teachers  of  the  Department  of  Early  Childhood  Education  of  the 
Alexander Technological Educational Institute in Thessaloniki, the second largest city in Greece. 
Three groups of student teachers (N=18, 16 women and 2 men) who were at the beginning, the 
middle, and the end of their teacher education participated in focus groups and discussed issues 
pertaining  to  their  professional  identity,  as  this  was  being  shaped  by  their  past  and  present 
teaching  experiences,  their  personal  beliefs  as  well  their  expectations  for  the  future  and  career 
plans.  Data  from  the  focus  groups  are  analyzed  using  IPA  (Interpretative  Phenomenological 
Analysis); they provide insights into the student teachers’ views and expectations regarding their 
professional role and future career and highlight the ‘confusion’ felt by most professionals in the 
Early  Childhood  Education  field  regarding  their  roles  and  responsibilities.  Implications  for 
teacher preparation programs and policies will be also discussed. 
 
Keywords: professional identity, student teachers, Early Childhood Education 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
19 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling