Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet9/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   25

(Re) Construction of Identities in Digital Learning Environments: A Case of 
Luganda Language Education Teacher-Trainees at Makerere University 
 
David Kabugo 
kabugodavids@gmail.com
 
      Fred Masagazi Masaazi 
      Anthony Muwagagga Mugagga 
 
At  various  educational  institutions  in  Uganda  and  beyond,  the  use  of  digital  learning 
environments  is  on  the  rise  with  the  intent  to  transform  students’  learning.  One  of  the  key 
indicators  of  transformation  in  students’  learning  is  the  ability  of  students  to  utilize  digital 
learning  environments  to  produce  learning  artefacts  that  embody,  enact  and  perpetuate  their 
identities. Although digital  learning environments  have potential to  retain  artefacts  of  students’ 
learning,  questions  regarding  the  nature  of  identities  that  such  artefacts  enact  and  perpetuate, 
remain underexplored. In this chapter, we report on how we utilized Critical Discourse Analysis 
(CDA)  to  analyze  the  learning  artefacts  that  Language  Education  teacher-trainees  at  Makerere 
University created in a semester-long course that was mediated by Wikispaces. Results show that 
engagement  in  production  of  learning  artefacts  using  Wikispaces  enacted  and  perpetuated 
trainees’ cultural, natural, institutional, professional, affinitive, and discursive identities. 
 
Keywords:  Emerging  Technologies  (ETs),  Online  Learning  Artefacts,  Digital  Identities,  and 
Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
51 
 
 
 
 
Student Teachers’ and Teacher Educators’ Reflections on Foreign Language 
Listening Anxiety 
 
Demet Yayli 
demety@pau.edu.tr
 
 
Listening  comprehension  plays  an  unarguably  huge  role  in  communication.  Since 
listening comprehension is at the heart of L2 learning, the development of second language (L2) 
listening  skills  influences  the  development  of  other  skills  (Dunkel,  1991).  In  spite  of  the  huge 
role listening plays in communication, L2 listening comprehension is “the least researched of all 
four language skills” (Vandergrift,  2007, p. 191).  In order  to  provide  an  effective  L2 listening 
instruction, teachers must  have a meticulous  understanding of different  dimensions  of listening 
skill.  As  we  all  know  “[a]  narrow  focus  on  the  right  answer  to  comprehension  questions 
(product) does little help students understand and control the process leading to comprehension” 
in  listening  (Vandergrift,  2007,  p.  191).  The  ubiquity  of  anxious  learners  in  foreign  language 
(FL) classes and potentially detrimental effects of anxiety on learners deserve a strong concern 
by  teachers.  Language  anxiety  is  described  as  “the  feeling  of  tension  and  apprehension 
specifically  associated  with  second  language  contexts,  including  speaking,  listening  and 
learning” (MacIntyre & Gardner, 1994). Teachers and students generally feel that anxiety is an 
obstacle  to  L2  learning.  Therefore,  some  foreign  language  teaching  methods  like  Community 
Language  Learning  and  Suggestopedia  provide  ways  to  reduce  learner  anxiety  in  language 
classrooms. According to MacIntyre and Gardner (1989), language anxiety develops if students 
experience  negative  emotions  and  attitudes  in  FL  learning  environments.  And  when  these 
negative  experiences  persist,  students  perform  poorly  and  this  causes  a  negative  impact  on 
students’  learning.  The  present  research  is,  therefore,  intended  to  report  on  listening  anxiety 
experienced in language classes. A group of student teachers and teacher educators participated 
in  this  study  to  reflect  on  their  own  and  their  students’  listening  anxiety.  Possible  causes  and 
effects of listening anxiety and ways of dealing with it were searched through a semi-structured 
interview with  a  group of student  teachers studying in an ELT program  at  a state university in 
Turkey.  Also,  I  interviewed  a  group  of  volunteering  teacher  educators  who  worked  in  an  ELT 
program  and  instructed  listening  classes  to  capture  their  views  on  their  students’  listening 
anxiety.  The  views  gathered  will  be  discussed  in  the  light  of  the  existing  research  and  some 
implications will be provided. 
 
Keywords: Foreign Language Education, Foreign Language Listening Anxiety, 
English Language Teaching, Teacher Education 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
52 
 
 
 
 
The Effect of Performance Tasks on Teaching English Vocabulary 
 
Derya Kılıç 
deeniiz4@hotmail.com
 
 
This  study  was  carried  out  to  investigate  the  effect  of  performance  tasks  on  teaching 
English vocabulary. It was conducted with the participation of 7
th
 grade students.  In this study, 
quasi experimental design with control group and qualitative data were collected by conducting 
interviews  with  students  and  teacher  observations.  The  teaching-learning  process  in  the 
experimental  group  was  carried  out  by  introducing  performance  tasks.  In  this  test,  the  students 
were  asked  to  find  out  Turkish  meanings  and  word  classes  of  English  vocabularies.  Their 
answers  were  scored  separately  including  their  Turkish  meanings  and  word  classes.  In 
comparison  of experimental and control  groups’ success  points, dependent  and unrelated t-test 
was  used.  The  research’s  qualitative  data  obtained  from  students’  opinions  and  teacher 
observations were analyzed descriptively. In this examination, units with the same meaning were 
grouped  under  a  common  code  by  bringing  them  together.  Data  obtained  from  teacher’s 
observation  were  recorded  by  writing  them  individually  and  they  were  analyzed  descriptively, 
too. The study was carried out within the creating ‘classroom vocabulary notebook’ performance 
task and limited to the vocabulary items in unit ‘computers’. Experimental group consisting of 
29 students were divided into 3 groups and these words were distributed to each group equally. 
Students were asked to learn their own words and teach them to other students. The aim was to 
enable  students  learn  and  teach  vocabulary  extracurricularly.  27  students  were  involved  in 
control  group  of  research  and  traditional  teaching  methods  were  used  in  the  teaching-learning 
process  of  this  group.  Students  in  the  experimental  group  reached  5.62  average  score  at 
beginning of the study and 22.14 average score at the end of the study. At the end of the study, 
the pre-test and post-test scores were compared by t-test and it was indicated that such activities 
were  more  effective  in  students’  learning  Turkish  meanings  and  word  classes  of  English 
vocabularies.  Traditional  teaching-learning  activities  performed  in  the  control  group  increased 
the  students'  average  score  from  8.78  to  9.22.  In  addition,  students’  views  suggested  that 
performance  tasks  contributed  positively  to  students’  developing  collaboration  skills  and  their 
learning  in  an  effective  and  enjoyable  way.  On  the  other  hand,  according  to  teachers’ 
observations,  it  was  noted  that  students  had  difficulty  in  group  work  activities  such  as 
performance tasks in terms of collaboration, taking the responsibility of their own learning and 
teaching, and task sharing. 
 
Keywords:  Performance  task,  teaching  vocabulary  techniques,  cooperative  learning,  teaching 
vocabulary, peer teaching 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
53 
 
 
 
 
ELT Student Teachers' Perceptions about Learner Autonomy in a Turkish State 
University 
 
Derya Oktar Ergür 
ergurderya@gmail.com
 
 
Learner  autonomy  has  grown  fast  over  the  last  three  decades  as  an  area  of  interest  in 
language  learning  and  teaching  process  with  a  change  from  teacher-centeredness  to  learner-
centeredness  in  education.  Benson  (2001:7)  suggests  that  learner  autonomy  has  become  a 
precondition for effective learning. Based on this idea, it is imperative that teachers and foreign 
language  curriculum  designers  benefit  from  the  implementation  of  learner  autonomy  in  their 
actual  classroom  environments  to  help  their  students  take  more  responsibility  for  their  own 
learning process. However, in-service language teachers still struggle with the ways to promote 
learner  autonomy  or  at  least  to  encourage  their  students  to  grasp  the  meaning  of  autonomy  in 
their learning environments  (Dickinson,  1992;  Nunan, 1997;  Littlewood,  1997;  Brajcich, 2000; 
Hurd, Beaven and Ortega, 2001). There is evidence in research studies to support the claim that 
increasing  the  level  of  learner  control  will  increase  the  level  of  self-determination,  thereby 
increasing overall motivation in the development of learner autonomy. Therefore it is vital that 
students  be  involved  in  making  decisions  about  their  own  learning  process.  In  this  process  as 
Barfield  (2001:3) argues,  teachers have  a crucial role since the ability to  behave  autonomously 
for students is dependent upon their teachers’ creating a classroom where autonomy is accepted 
as  a  culture.  Therefore,  without  any  autonomy-oriented  training,  language  teachers  may 
experience  difficulties  in  creating  such  a  classroom  culture.  On  the  basis  of  this  framework,  it 
can  be  easily  said  that  language  teachers  need  to  experience  autonomous  skills  during  their 
teacher  training  so  that  they  will  be  equipped  with  the  necessary  skills  of  learner  autonomy 
before  they  graduate.  The  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  get  an  understanding  of  ELT  student 
teachers’  perceptions  about  learner  autonomy  in  Hacettepe  University  context  and  to  provide 
some suggestions  to  the  teacher educators at  ELT Departments.  The study  employed  a survey-
based  collection  on  94  senior  student  teachers  at  Hacettepe  University,  Ankara,  Turkey.  The 
quantitative  data  were  derived  by  a  questionnaire  developed  by  Camilleri  (1997)  consisting  of 
fifteen items on a five-point scale of agreement. A demographic information form was included 
to get some data about the student teachers’ gender, proficiency level in English and cumulative 
academic average. In addition, to strengthen the study design, the respondents were also asked to 
share their insights and views regarding their perceptions of learner autonomy, the importance of 
autonomy, strategies that can be used in and outside the classroom and the teaching and learning 
environment  in  Turkey.  Quantitative  data  was  presented  by  using  descriptive  statistics  (the 
percentages of responses) and the results of the statistical analysis were found using SPSS 15 for 
Windows.  Qualitative  data  was  analyzed  by  representing  the  frequencies.  In  the  light  of  the 
findings,  some  recommendations  about  the  various  components  of  learning-  teaching  process 
were given to the teacher educators. 
 
Keywords: ELT student teachers, learner autonomy, perceptions, Turkey 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
54 
 
 
 
 
A Study on Pre-Service Teachers’ Emotions in a Turkish Context 
 
Derya Yayli 
dyayli@pau.edu.tr
 
 
The issue of identity formation in teacher education research has recently grown interest 
in teacher emotions. The individual and professional development of teachers is now believed to 
have  a  lot  to  do  with  positive  and  negative  emotions  as  emotions  account  for  commitment  to 
change. Thus studying emotions could provide us with a deep insight into the procedures through 
which  in-service  and  pre-service  teachers  change,  construct  and  co-construct  their  identities. 
With  this  asset  in  mind,  this  study  aims  to  investigate  the  emotions  of  pre-service  teachers  of 
Turkish  language at  a  state  university in  Turkey. Despite numerous studies in  the literature, no 
studies have been carried out in the Turkish context. Some research to be conducted in different 
settings  like  Turkey  could  make  a  contribution  to  the  field  of  teacher  education.  This  study, 
therefore, looks into the emotions of 11 pre-service teachers in the spring term as they perform 
their teaching at schools. Participants have an age average of 21.65, and 7 of them are female and 
4 are male. The data were collected through journals and face to face semi-structured interviews. 
They  volunteered  to  keep  journals  throughout  the  spring  term  and  were  interviewed  at  the 
beginning and at the end of the term. In their journals, they made weekly entries about how their 
emotions  changed  and  developed  during  the  period  of  faculty-school  collaboration.  They  were 
asked to make their reflections and stances as critical as they could. For the rest of the study, a 
content  analysis  will  be  used  to  analyze  the  qualitative  data.  The  codes  and  themes  will  be 
obtained from the analysis and comments will be made with reference to  the literature. For the 
reliability  of  the  study,  another  researcher  from  the  field  will  be  consulted.  If  there  is  any 
disagreement about the coding, the related points will be negotiated. The findings from the study 
will be discussed and implications for teacher education and further research will be made. 
 
Keywords: pre-service teacher educations; identity development; emotions 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
55 
 
 
 
 
Questioning in Primary School Mathematics: An Analysis Of Questions 
Teachers Ask in Mathematics Lessons 
 
Despina Desli 
ddesli@eled.auth.gr
 
Elisavet Galanopoulou 
 
Research  examining  teacher  questioning  has  shown  the  importance  of  the  kinds  of 
questions  teachers  ask.  In  particular,  effective  questioning  has  been  linked  with  argumentation 
and classroom communication as well as with promoting students’ understanding and learning, 
extending students’ ideas and helping them to construct scientific knowledge. The purpose of the 
present study was to examine the place and frequency of questions addressed by primary school 
teachers  to  children  when  teaching  mathematics.  For  this  purpose,  observation  took  place  with 
two experienced in-service primary school teachers in the course of four mathematics lessons in 
order:  a)  to  identify  whether  three  types  of  questions,  namely  probing,  guiding  and  factual 
questions, were implemented in their classes and b) to study the frequency of these three types of 
questions.  Interviews  were  also  conducted  to  further  investigate  teachers’  perceptions  of 
questioning  in  mathematics  as  well  as  issues  related  to  reasons  for  asking  particular  types  of 
questions in mathematics lessons. Observation data showed that probing questions (‘How do you 
know that…?’, ‘Can you explain why..?’) were rarely used by either teacher. One of the teachers 
asked more factual questions (‘What is the definition of …?’, ‘What number did  you get to?’) 
overall than the other teacher who mostly posed guiding questions (‘What was  your strategy?’, 
‘What will you do next?’). In the interviews, both teachers recognized that particular parts of a 
lesson -in relation to the mathematical content involved- allow for particular types of questions 
asked by teachers. For example, asking probing questions were considered more appropriate for 
the  summary  part  of  a  lesson,  whereas  factual  questions  for  the  introduction  part  of  a  lesson 
when checking previous knowledge was needed. Probing questions were highly valued by both 
teachers  who  believed  that  this  type  of  questions  gave  children  the  opportunity  to  justify  their 
ideas  and  improved  their  thinking,  thus,  they  should  be  addressed  more  frequently  in 
mathematics lessons. However, observation data revealed that the opposite really happened. As 
both  teachers  realize,  the  act  of  asking  a  question  with  specific  indicators  is  cognitively 
demanding and requires that they know their learners’ mathematical knowledge well. Findings of 
the  study  reveal  the  importance  of  questioning  in  mathematics  teaching  and  learning  in  the 
primary school. 
 
Keywords: Primary school mathematics, questions, teachers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
56 
 
 
 
 
Teacher Training and the Case of International Baccalaureate Organization: 
The Emergence of a New Teachers’ Professional Identity in Light of New Modes 
Of Global Governance in Education 
 
Despina Tsakiri 
tsakiri.despina@gmail.com
 
Sofia Smyrni 
Dimitra Pavlina Nikita 
 
The  modern  competitive  society  seems  to  be  dominated  by  a  constant  struggle  for 
accumulation of knowledge, higher aims and achievements. Education plays the role of catalyst 
in this context. The commodification of knowledge at a global level not only by the nations but 
also  by  the  international,  economic  and  educational  organizations  appears  to  be  a  strong  and 
sufficient condition that ensures participation in the globalized educational field. In that regard, 
International Baccalaureate (IB), which was the research topic of the present proposal, seems to 
be one of the key components of this field. The data collection included annual reviews retrieved 
from the IB Organisation (IBO) covering the period 2007-2013 which were put in the center of a 
documentary analysis. The overarching aim was to study the evolution of IB as an institution, to 
adumbrate  the  profile  of  the  organization  which  is  responsible  for  the  implementation  of  the 
program  and  to  investigate  the  role  of  IB  in  the  current  global  educational  field.  A  set  of 
qualitative  and  quantitative  data  helped  to  shed  light  on  various  issues  regarding  international 
education  and  IB  schools.  However,  of  particular  interest  and  with  regard  to  the  scope  of  this 
proposal is the profile of the teacher of IB schools as it emerged through the data analysis. The 
teacher seems to be considered as an invaluable component within the context of IB schools in 
their  attempt  to  take  the  lead  role  in  the  context  of  international  education.  As  a  result,  the 
continuous  professional  development  (CPD)  of  teachers  is  a  pivotal  issue.  In  light  of  above, 
teacher  training  appears  in  the  texts  of  all  the  reviews,  particularly  in  the  one  of  2013  as  a 
strategic priority for the IBO. Neoliberal ideas that foster a culture of competitiveness, the need 
to  perform better, improve and be more effective, tend to infiltrate the CPD of teachers, which 
has become a tool to promote new forms of governance in education. Local and in-house training 
are waning and other types of training are reinforced, i.e. training that embodies the features of 
international  education  and  which  is  delivered  through  networks  and  co-operations  with 
governments  and  other  international  organizations.  In  the  aftermath  of  this  new  dimension 
attributed to teacher training by IBO and within the new context for the CPD of teachers, a new 
teachers’ professional identity seems to rise which is aligned with and governed by the principles 
of the globalized educational field. 
 
Keywords:  Teacher training, Continuous  professional  development,  International  Baccalaureate 
Organization, Professional identity, Global governance, Global Education Field 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
57 
 
 
 
 
In-Service Teacher Continuing Training in Greece: An Overview of Institutional 
Training 
 
Despoina Styla 
dstyla@uth.gr
 
Aikaterini Michalopoulou 
 
Continuing  training  activities  seek  to  update,  develop  and  broaden  the  knowledge 
teachers  acquired  during  the  initial  teacher  education  and  provide  them  with  new  skills  and 
professional  understanding.  It  is  necessary  for  teachers  to  update  their  skills,  especially  in  the 
context in which the school situation has changed (introduction of new curriculum, new research 
on teaching, and adaptation to the changes in student needs due to socio-economic evolutions). 
Legislation,  concerning  teacher  training  in  Greece,  can  be  traced  back  to  1910  with  the 
establishment  of  the  “Didaskaleion”,  a  training  institute  for  Secondary  Education  teachers 
(Official Gazette A152/22-4-1910), while in 1922, Law number 2857 (Official Gazette, A133/1-
8-1922)  introduced  training  programs  for  Primary  Education  teachers  at  the  University  of 
Athens.  The  education  reform  of  1976  created  professional  teacher  training  schools  for 
elementary and secondary teachers, called “SELDE-SELME”, which offered in-service training 
for one year. An attempt to improve the above teacher training system led to the setting up of a 
network of regional centers for professional training (known as PEKs). Their establishment was 
proposed in 1981, enacted in 1985 and implemented in 1992, for newly appointed teachers. Their 
training  aimed  to  provide  knowledge  about  the  use  of  teaching  methods,  assessment  and  class 
management.  A  major  innovation  was  the  implementation,  under  Law  number  2986  (Official 
Gazette,  A24/13-2-2002),  of  the  Teacher  Training  Agency  (OEPEK),  supervised  by  the  Greek 
Minister  of  Education,  responsible  for  setting  training  policy,  coordinating  and  implementing 
training  activities.  This  paper  aims  to  present  and  analyze  the  above  training  institutes  and 
compare them, in order to examine the problems teachers faced all those years throughout their 
training,  within  the  framework  of  those  institutes,  and  the  progress  (made  or  not)  in  the 
organization of Greek in-service training by those institutes. The results seem to be encouraging 
as  far  as  the  quality  of  the  offered  training  is  concerned  and  this  is  very  important  because 
teacher training has a significant impact on teachers’ behaviors, teaching skills and most of all on 
the students’ outcomes.  
 
Keywords:  Greece,  in-service,  continuing,  training,  training  institutes,  problems,  progress, 
quality. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling