Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet8/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   25

Evaluation of Origami Activities Created by Prospective Class Teachers 
 
Burcu Sezginsoy Şeker 
sezginsoy@balikesir.edu.tr
 
 
The aim of this study was to determine the opinions of the prospective class teachers who 
prepared  origami  for  different  discipline  areas.  Origami  is  the  art  of  paper-folding  in  Japan. 
Figures  created  from  folded  a  paper,  leaving  a  concrete  impact  on  the  learning  of  individuals. 
This situation raises the use of origami in teaching classes consisting of abstract concepts to the 
forefront. Class teachers can create limitless and different figures with origami materials such as 
concrete figures like animal or stuff, three dimensional geometric figures and fragmental origami 
as  using same pieces.  In this  research, prospective class teachers created  origami activities that 
could be used in different discipline areas within the scope of visual arts education. This research 
was  carried  out  with  thirty-five  undergraduate  students  at  Balıkesir  University,  Faculty  of 
Necatibey  Education,  Primary  School  Teaching  Undergraduate  Program.  A  form  was  given  to 
the  students  in  the  research  that  included  open-ended  questions  requiring  consideration  of 
origami activities which they had prepared. The answers that students provided to the questions 
in  consideration  form  were  recorded  and  expression  in  the  answers  were  summarized  and 
interpreted with descriptive analysis technique.  
 
Keywords: Origami, prospective class teachers, art activities 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
43 
 
 
 
 
The Perceived Effects of Career Progression Barriers of Female Teachers 
 
C. Ergin Ekinci 
eekinci@mu.edu.tr
 
 
As  it  is  the  case  in  many  countries,  although  women  represent  the  majority  of  the 
teaching workforce (55,5%) in schools in Turkey, they are disproportionately under-represented 
in  school  management  positions  (about  3%).  Therefore,  it  is  important  to  identify  the  factors 
hindering  the  career  development  of  women  teachers  in  schools  in  order  to  contribute  into  the 
development of activities and policies enabling them to access management positions. The study 
aims to be useful within this respect. The main purpose of the study is to identify the perceived 
effects of career progression barriers (related with gendered home responsibilities, social gender 
stereo-types,  school  setting  and  its  environment,  education,  working  hours,  economy,  age  and 
marital  status)  of  female  teachers  based  on  male  and  female  teachers`  perceptions.  Within  this 
general frame, the following questions were addressed; 1. To what extend the above mentioned 
barriers  hinder  the  career  advancement  of  female  teachers?;  2.  Are  there  any  significant 
differences between the perceptions of teachers about the barriers hindering career progression of 
female  teachers  by  gender,  school  type  and  seniority?  The  data  of  this  descriptive  study  were 
collected  through  the  administration  of  a  five  point  Likert  scaled  questionnaire  to  randomly 
selected 446 elementary and lower-secondary education teachers in the city of Van, Turkey. The 
mean  scores  of  career-related  barriers  were  calculated.  One  way  ANOVA  and  t-test  for 
independent  groups  were  used  to  test  whether  mean  scores  were  significantly  different  on  the 
basis of gender, school type and seniority. Significance value less than 0.05 stipulates that there 
is  a  significant  differentiation  among/between  the  perceptions  of  diverse  groups  of  a  variable. 
The major results of the study indicate that the teachers find (1) gendered home responsibilities 
related  reasons  as  a  very  highly  hindering  barrier  of  career  progression  of  the  female  teachers 
with  3,72  mean  score,  and  (2)  social  gender  stereo-types  related  reasons  with  2,89  mean  score 
and education, working hours, economy, age and marital status related reasons with 2,75 mean 
score  as  moderately  hindering  barriers  of  career  progression  of  the  female  teachers.  The  mean 
scores  of teacher perceptions  on home responsibilities  (t=4,409, p= ,000), social gender stereo-
types (t=2,739, p=,006) show significant difference by gender in favor of female teachers. There 
is  also  significant  difference  between  the  mean  scores  of  teacher  perceptions  on  gender  and 
stereo-types  (t=  444,  p=  ,029)  in  Cavour  of  lower-secondary  school  teachers.  Seniority  is  not 
influential on the perceptions of teachers. 
 
Keywords: Career development, barriers of career development of female teachers. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
44 
 
 
 
 
The Relationship between Prospective Teachers’ Educational Beliefs and their 
Views about Critical Pedagogy 
 
Çağlar Kaya 
caglarkaya@mu.edu.tr
 
Sinem Kaya 
 
The main idea of this research is to determine prospective teachers’ educational beliefs 
and their views about critical pedagogy. Therefore the purpose of this research is to analyze the 
relationship  between  prospective  teachers’  educational  beliefs  and  their  views  about  critical 
pedagogy.  In  this  study,  “Educational  Beliefs  Scale”,  developed  by  Yılmaz,  Altınkurt  and 
Çokluk  (2011)  is  used  with  the  “Principals  of  Critical  Pedagogy  Scale”  developed  by  Yılmaz 
(2009).  Based  on  the  Educational  Beliefs  Scale,  five  theories  on  educational  philosophy 
including: Perennialism, Essentialism, Progressivism, Reconstructionalism, and Existentionalism 
are  examined.  Besides,  Education  System,  Functions  of  School  and  the  Emancipator  School 
dimensions of the Principals of Critical Pedagogy Scale are analyzed. The research is conducted 
as  a survey model study. The sample of the research comprises  of last  grade  graduate students 
from the different departments of the Faculty of Education in Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University. 
The data analysis is still in progress. Descriptive statistics, t-tests and ANOVA analysis will be 
applied  to  the  data  collected  in  the  data  analysis  process.  The  findings  will  be  presented 
according to the research questions of the study. In addition the findings will be discussed with 
the related literature at the end of the paper.  
 
Keywords: Prospective teachers, educational beliefs, educational philosophy, 
critical pedagogy, critical thinking 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
45 
 
 
 
 
Prospective Middle School Teachers’ Perspectives about Model Eliciting Tasks 
 
Celil Karabaş 
celilkarabas55@gmail.com
 
Osman Bağdat 
H. Bahadır Yanık 
Yasin Memiş 
 
 
Mathematical modelling may be defined as a process of analyzing real life or realistic life 
situations  mathematically. The steps of this process  constructed differently  by different  authors 
and  in  any  way,  while  struggling  with  model  eliciting  tasks,  there  may  happen  turn  backs  and 
transitions through the steps. With group activities, carried on with 3 or 4 students, abilities such 
as organizing data, communication, using mathematics and verification may be developed. The 
purpose of the study was to define the views of prospective middle school mathematics teachers 
who  solved  model  eliciting  tasks  in  a  mathematical  modelling  course.  The  data  was  collected 
from 27 prospective teachers through open ended questions. The findings discussed under three 
headings: (1) the definitions of prospective mathematics teachers about model eliciting tasks, (2) 
positive and negative views of prospective mathematics teachers to model eliciting tasks and (3) 
attitudes  about  using  model  eliciting  tasks  in  their  mathematics  classrooms.  The  prospective 
mathematics  teachers  generally  stated  that  model  eliciting  tasks  were  away  from  rote 
memorization  approach,  combined  the  abstract  part  of  mathematics  with  real  life,  didactic  and 
enjoyable. They stated that model eliciting tasks developed various mathematical skills such as 
problem  solving,  functional  and  relational  thinking,  algebraic  thinking,  mathematical  thinking, 
making  generalizations,  questioning,  analyzing  and  interpreting,  They  indicated  that  model 
eliciting  problems  provided  opportunities  to  transfer  real-life  information  to  the  problems  and 
vice  versa.  The  negative  views  of  prospective  mathematics  teachers  were  that:  Model  eliciting 
problems were generally scary at first glance, long, challenging and difficult to define variables 
and they had no definite answer. The prospective teachers mostly indicated that they might use 
model eliciting problems in their classrooms. However, because of model eliciting tasks couldn’t 
be  applied  to  any  subject,  they  might  use  them  mostly  in  elective  courses.  While  a  few 
prospective  teacher  argued  that  because  of  tiring  and  taking  time,  model  eliciting  tasks  caused 
negative attitude to mathematics so it shouldn’t be used in mathematics classes. In conclusion, 
there  were  many  different  views  about  model  eliciting  problems.  The  prospective  teachers 
generally  agreed  that  model  eliciting  tasks  provided  various  skills  to  students.  However,  the 
negative  views  generally  focused  on  the  challenge  of  the  implementation  process  of  model 
eliciting tasks. 
 
Keywords: Prospective middle school mathematics teachers, mathematical modeling 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
46 
 
 
 
 
A Teacher Perspective on Using Model Eliciting Tasks 
 
Celil Karabaş 
celilkarabas55@gmail.com
 
Osman Bağdat 
H. Bahadır Yanık 
 
The  process  of  finding  out  mathematical  rules  embedded  in  real  life  or  realistic  life 
situations  is  defined  “mathematical  modelling”,  and  the  physical  and  symbolic  expression  of 
these rules is defined as “model”. Model eliciting tasks provides opportunities to students to be 
aware of mathematical concepts and to develop the ability of overcoming these problems faced 
in  real  life.  The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to  explore  a  middle  school  mathematics  teacher’s 
experiences about using model eliciting tasks in his fifth grade class. The data collected through 
interviews  and  document  analysis.  The  findings  of  the  study  suggested  that  initially  while  the 
teacher  faced  with  various  challenges  in  implementing  model  eliciting  tasks  in  his  classroom, 
later he was able to transform his classroom’s environment into model exploration. The teacher 
stated that the most challenging issue he had to  deal  with  was  about  transferring his  classroom 
environment in a way that students’ explore mathematical models. Also, because of getting used 
to the problems which had definite answers, it was difficult to perceive model eliciting problems 
with  multiple  solution  paths.  Furthermore,  sometimes  it  was  hard  to  keep  down  the  student 
groups who were in interaction. Although the teacher faced various challenges, he indicated that 
if these challenges were overcome, applying model eliciting tasks might provide utilities. A well 
prepared context and group interactions might even provide uninterested students to involve in a 
problem.  Furthermore,  group  interactions  might  uncover  several  creative  ideas.  He  also  stated 
that  with  model  eliciting  tasks,  students  would  use  mathematics  in  real  life  and  they  would  be 
aware the need of mathematics in different disciplines. The mathematics teacher proposed to the 
teachers who wanted to apply model eliciting tasks in their classrooms that they should combine 
theory and practice of model eliciting tasks and use technology. As a result, although it is hard to 
get  a  habit  of  applying  model  eliciting  tasks  in  classrooms,  if  accomplished,  the  students  may 
acquire various skills at the end of this process. 
 
Keywords: model eliciting tasks, mathematics teacher, view 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
47 
 
 
 
 
Teacher Improvement through the Design, Implementation and Evaluation of a 
Flipped Classroom 
 
Christina Bourlaki 
geotina6@gmail.com
 
Domna-Mika Kakana 
 
An effective teacher, who is confronted with daily challenges in education, experiments 
on  new  teaching  approaches  in  order  to  improve  him/herself,  as  well  as  his/her  work  and  its 
effectiveness,  which  of  course  is  directly  linked  to  the  learners’  learning  benefits  in  parallel  to 
the satisfaction they acquire from the learning process. Flipped Instruction (FI) is an innovative 
teaching  method  applied  by  a  teacher–  researcher  in  the  5
th
  grade  of  a  Primary  School.  FI  is  a 
kind of blended learning, which involves the learner in watching video recorded lessons at their 
own, private space prior to entering the class, with an eye to exploiting the teaching session for 
cooperative  activities.  The  aim  of  this  research  has  been  to  design  FI  for  the  subject  of 
Geography and explore its effectiveness in learning, as well as the effectiveness of the teacher–
researcher.  A  semi-experimental  design  has  been  developed  for  two  different  5
th
  grade  classes, 
which have approached the same concepts in the subject of Geography with a different teaching 
approach, in order to be able to obtain comparable data. The experience of teaching Geography 
through FI for the first time has been quite demanding in the preparation of each one of the ten 
teaching sessions and their execution via LAMS, in order to ensure that the content of the video 
recorded  lesson  was  adequately  comprehensible  and  the  activities  in  the  classroom  were 
supportive in the consolidation of the various concepts. However, it has been estimated that the 
time required is not a lot more than the time dedicated in the preparation for traditional teaching 
for the delivery of a lecture and the preparedness to answer the learners’ emerging questions. By 
means  of  the  Flipped  Classroom,  the  role  of  the  teacher  who  holds  the  knowledge  has  been 
transformed  to  the  one  who  facilitates  it.  Upon  teaching  in  the  classroom,  the  researcher  – 
teacher  has  assumed  the  role  of  the  coordinator  and  facilitator.  The  other  group,  which  has 
operated  as  a  Control  Group,  has  followed  a  traditional  teaching  course.  Pre-testing  and  post-
testing  have  been  applied  in  order  to  assess  the  performance  of  the  learners.  The  integrated 
analysis has  shown that FI is  an effective teaching method for the subject of Geography of the 
5th grade. To be more precise, it has been observed that the average performance of the learners 
of  the  First  Group  has  steadily  increased,  but,  what  is  more,  compared  to  the  Control  Group, 
there  has  been  significant  increase  in  the  degree  of  satisfaction  derived  from  the  teaching 
approach  and  the  degree  of  willingness  to  cooperate  in  the  First  Group.  Finally,  according  to 
some  of  the  most  significant  findings,  we  believe  that  this  particular  model  has  improved  the 
teacher not to be afraid to experiment with new approaches and that the traditional lesson is not 
always more effective. 
 
Keywords:  Flipped  Classroom  Flipped  Teaching,  Video  Recorded  Lessons,  Collaborative 
Learning, Performance, Satisfaction 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
48 
 
 
 
 
The Academic Teacher as a Practical Training Supervisor: Towards a Quality 
Guide of Good Practices 
 
Christina  
Roussi – Vergou 
xroussi@uth.gr
 
Faye 
 Garagouni – Areou 
Anastasia  
Mavidou 
Domna – Mika Kakana 
 
As  the  literature  recognizing  the  practical  training  (internship)  as  a  valuable  step  in  the 
transition from education to professional life (European Youth Forum, 2013) flourishes, the lack 
of clear quality guidelines concerning the role of the academic supervisor becomes more evident, 
resulting in  undermining the main purpose of internships as  educational  opportunities  that give 
practical  skills  to  young  people.  In  Greece,  the  Practical  Training  (or  Internship  Program)  is 
already  an  embedded  procedure  in  the  academic  curricula  of  the  Greek  Universities.  Practical 
Training programs are currently supported by the co-funded European Programs “EDULL 2007-
2013”  since  the  practical  training  programs  are  becoming  an  organic  part  of  the  academic 
curriculum of the Universities in Greece, the role of the academic supervision on how the goals 
of  the  practical  training  will  be  accomplished,  evolves  more  critical.  Yet,  very  little  is  known 
about the role of the academic supervision and each performance and it is a misconception that 
academic  supervision  can  be  delivered  by  anyone  who  has  academic  teaching  experience 
(Anderson, Major, & Mitchell, 1992). The purpose of our study is to cast some light on the role 
of the academic supervisor, according to the evaluations of about 3,000 university students who 
participated  in  the  practical  training  program  of  the  University  of  Thessaly,  during  the  period 
2011-2014.  Qualitative  thematic  analysis  with  the  use  of  the  NVivo  program  was  performed. 
According to students, the supervisor should have a more active role, be more available and offer 
more  extended  guidance.  As  no  academic  supervisors’  guidelines  are  available  so  far,  our 
discussion  of  the  findings,  with  special  focus  on  the  good  practices,  shall  pursue  the  ultimate 
goal of the proposal of a “manual” which shall include all the good practices, a kind of a Quality 
Guide of Academic Supervisors. 
 
Keywords: Academic Supervision, Practical Training, Internship 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
49 
 
 
 
 
Primary Teachers' Professional Development in Instructional Design:  Blending 
Formal and Non-Formal Settings 
 
Christina Tsaliki 
tsalikix@gmail.com
 
Georgios Malandrakis 
Petros Kariotoglou 
 
The  present  study  is  part  of  a  larger  professional  development  (PD)  program  regarding 
in-service  science  teachers’  education  (STED)  aiming  to  broaden  their  teaching  and  inquiry 
views and practices.  In this participatory design research a mixed group approach was adopted. 
In particular, two primary and two secondary teachers were engaged, in order to be familiarized, 
in  cooperation  with  researchers  group,  to  the  instructional  design,  putting  emphasis  on  the 
development  of  Teaching  Learning  Sequences  (TLS)  and  on  the  incorporation  of  informal 
settings into their teaching. STED is consisted of three phases: In first phase, participants’ initial 
teaching  profile  was  outlined,  and  a  TLS  concerning  materials  used  in  telecommunications, 
along with a site visit to Greek telecom were also prepared. In the second phase, teachers were 
trained  in  current  trends  of  Science  Education  and  they  familiarized  with  the  given  TLS. 
Following  this,  they  adapted  and  implemented  the  given  TLS  to  the  particular  teaching  and 
learning conditions of their class. In 3
rd
 phase, teachers developed their own TLS within the topic 
of  renewable  and  non-renewable  energy  sources  and  Electromagnetism  applications  for  energy 
generation. They also organized a site visit to a local power station plant. In the present study we 
record, analyze and discuss changes observed only to primary teachers during the 3
rd
 phase of the 
program.  Throughout  all phases,  changes  in  teachers' profile were captured using multiple data 
sources (i.e. classroom observations, teachers' interviews, teachers and researchers' diaries). Data 
was gathered and independently analyzed by two researchers using standard qualitative analysis 
methods.  Results  indicate  progressive  broadening  in  teachers’  practices  during  the  project’s 
phases.  Starting  from  a  teacher-centered  teaching  approach  they  gradually  progressed  towards 
more guided discovery (2
nd
 phase), while during the 3
rd
 phase they created their own worksheets 
and  applied  inquiry  teaching  combined  with  jigsaw  type  group  work.  Progression  was  more 
evident in relevance to teaching, where more open inquiry methods were implemented, as well as 
to  verbal  communication,  use  of  ICT  and  experimenting  skills.  Teachers  noted  that  the 
scaffolding  design  of  the  participatory  research  enabled  them  to  be  familiarized  with  inquiry-
based instructional design and felt more confident and motivated to adopt similar approaches in 
the  future.  Other  professional  development  gains  were  also  mentioned,  mainly  concerning 
teacher  reflection,  handling  student  group-work  and  organizing  site  visits  with  focused  pre, 
during and post visit activities. Students’ progress was also reported as an encouraging factor, as 
they became more creative through inquiry, improving their searching and metacognitive skills. 
 
*This paper is made under the project "ARISTEIA II", action: "SCIENCE TEACHERS EDUCATION" which was 
implemented within the framework of the European Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and co-funded by 
the European Union and national resources. 
 
Keywords:  Professional  development,  science teacher education, instructional  design, Teaching 
Learning Sequences (TLS), non-formal education. 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
50 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling