Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet20/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25
Participating Teachers 
 
Nikolaos Yfantopoulos 
yfantopoulosn@gmail.com
 
Antigoni-Alba 
Papakonstantinou 
Anastasios Emvalotis 
 
In  response  to  teachers'  constant  demands  and  taking  under  consideration  results  from 
scientific research regarding in service education of primary teachers, the Institute of Educational 
Research  and  Studies  launched  a  series  of  free  of  charge  seminars  addressed  to  teachers  of 
Epirus, West Macedonia and Thessaly. The main aim of these seminars was to provide teachers 
with knowledge and skills that would help them to effectively respond to social, educational and 
didactic  changes.  A  number  of  topics  were  proposed  and  groups  were  formed  in  several  cities 
according  to  the  teachers'  choices.  The  present  study  focuses  on  the  profile  of  teachers  who 
chose  to  follow  the  seminars  on  Information  and  Communication  Technologies.  More 
specifically, our goal  can be considered to be dual: On the one hand, we will try to investigate 
the characteristics of teachers who choose to receive in service education on ICT. On the other 
hand, we will examine the reasons that lead to this choice, as well as their plans and initiatives 
concerning  introduction  of  ICT  in  their  courses.  Thus,  we  decided  to  follow  a  quantitative 
approach  and  created  a  questionnaire  that  was  distributed  to  all  teachers  participating  in  ICT 
seminars. In fact, more than 100 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Preliminary results 
reveal  the  profile  of  participating  teachers  who  are  mainly  40-50  years  old,  with  more  than  15 
years of working experience and just basic knowledge on ICT, even though several of them have 
attended  similar  in  service  seminars  in  the  past.  As  the  analysis  of  the  answers  reveals,  the 
teachers  recognize  the  importance  of  ICT  in  the  education  process  and  wish  to  acquire  more 
practical  knowledge  on  specific  software  applications.  They  would  like  to  receive  training  in 
programs that would facilitate their teaching, learn how to use the technical equipment offered in 
schools, as well as enhance their social media skills. Their intention is to establish the use of ICT 
in their everyday teaching and transfer the obtained knowledge to their students. 
 
Keywords: in service education, ICT, primary school teachers 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
150   
 
 
 
Surveying Information and Communication Technology Skills and Perceptions 
of Greek Student Teachers: The Results of a Small Scale Study 
 
Nikoletta Avgerinou 
nikoletta_avg@hotmail.com
  
Maria Giakoumi 
Aikaterini Kyriakoreizi  
Helen  
Drenoyianni 
 
Over  the  past  20  years,  it  has  become  evident  that  ICT  represents  an  indispensable 
component  of  the  initial  teacher  education  program  of  studies.  The  nature  and  the  form  of  ICT 
inclusion  is  variable  across  countries  and  dependent  upon  a  range  of  factors,  but  many  teacher 
preparation  programs  are  still  struggling  to  achieve  a  balance  between  the  pedagogical  use  of  ICT 
tools and the development of ICT skills. Research indicates that technical proficiency is not sufficient 
for  using  ICT  as  a  pedagogical  tool,  yet  lack  of  ICT  skills  may  impede  the  employment  of 
technology  in  a  learning  context  and  inhibit  classroom  use  of  ICT.  On  the  other  hand,  nearly  all 
European  and  OECD  countries  have  included  ICT  as  an  integral  part  of  their  secondary  school 
curriculum,  rendering  the  development  of  ICT  skills  a  requirement  and  a  responsibility  of 
compulsory  education.  Nevertheless  and  despite  these  initiatives,  it  appears  that  students’  level  of 
ICT  competence  is  still  considerably  variable,  while  many  may  not  be  adequately  fluent  in  ICT. 
Within this framework, the study reported here aims at examining Greek student teachers’ ICT skills, 
as well as their perceptions on the use of ICT on their entry to a primary teacher education program 
offered  by  a  Greek  university.  Student  teachers’  skills  and  perceptions  were  surveyed  through  the 
administration  of  a  questionnaire.  128  student  teachers  have  participated  in  the  study,  and  the 
questionnaire  used  consisted  of  17  questions.  Five  of  them  collected  background  information 
(gender, self-rated ICT competence, sources of ICT skills acquirement, comments on school courses 
and the use of ICT in teaching), while the remaining 12 represented test items, concerned with basic 
ICT  skills.  Test  items  were  mainly  compiled  using  the  current  secondary  education  syllabi  and 
textbooks and consisted of a range of questions grouped into five main categories; word processing, 
spreadsheets,  presentation  software,  email  use  and  information  seeking.  The  analysis  of  the  data 
collected illustrated a rather gloomy picture with respect to ICT competence. Almost 50% of student 
teachers report themselves as good or average users of ICT and 47% perceive their level of ICT use 
as  very  good  or  excellent.  However,  the  average  total  score  of  all  participants  in  the  test  items 
administered  was  22.46/40  (min=  5, max=37), indicating  a  moderate  performance,  contradictory  to 
their self-perceptions. Students’ performance was far better in the cases of word processing and email 
use, particularly low in spreadsheets and presentation software, and average on information seeking 
test  items.  Furthermore,  all  students  (100%)  reported  that  they  have  attended  ICT  courses  during 
their secondary school studies. However, 78% comment that their skills in ICT were acquired out of 
school and 76% characterized secondary ICT school courses as inadequate, making negative remarks 
on the theoretical content of the school courses and a variety of classroom management and course 
organization  problems.  The  study’s  results  are  discussed  in  the  light  of  relevant  national  and 
contemporary  international  literature  concerned  with  student  teachers’  ICT  competence  and  the 
quality  of  school  courses  on  ICT,  while  their  implications  are  considered  with  respect  to  the 
appropriate  model  of  ICT  incorporation  in  an  increasingly  overloaded  and  demanding  teacher 
education program. 
 
Keywords: ICT Skills, ICT Literacy, Teacher Education, Primary Education
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
151   
 
 
 
How Capable Turkish Elementary Teachers are In Implementing Multiple 
Intelligence Theory in Social Studies: A Qualitative Research 
 
Nurcan Şener 
nsener@marmara.edu.tr
 
Yücel Kabapınar 
M. Cihangir Doğan 
 
It was generally aimed in this study to investigate learning environments of the teachers 
respect  to  multiple  intelligence  applications.  The  study  was  designed  based  on  qualitative 
research model and according to objectives of the research, qualitative data collection techniques 
were  employed.  To  identify  the  use  of  Multiple  Intelligence  in  teaching  materials  for  Social 
Studies and Multiple Intelligence types, which were addressed in activities, 4 different textbook 
sets,  12  textbooks  in  total,  among  4
th
  grade  of  elementary  school  and  6
th
  grade  of  secondary 
school  textbooks,  which  were  in  the  use  in  the  academic  year  of  2012-2013  in  elementary 
schools  in  Turkey  with  approval  of  the  board  of  education  and  discipline  were  researched. 
Contents, activities, texts  and figures  in  the books  were identified one by  one to  find which of 
multiple  intelligence  types  were  aimed  to  be  developed.  According  to  the  results  from  the 
document  research,  the  most  dominant  intelligence  activities  in  textbooks  of  Social  Studies 
among  primary  and  secondary  multiple  intelligence  activities  are  logical  intelligence  activities. 
The  most  dominant  one  among  primary  multiple  intelligence  activities  in  students’  studying 
books is verbal intelligence while the most dominant one among secondary multiple intelligence 
activities is logical intelligence activities. The other hand, the researcher designed the “template 
of  observation  related  to  the  use  of  multiple  intelligence  applications”  to  identify  multiple 
intelligence  applications  of  teachers  in  the  course  of  Social  Studies.  According  to  the  results 
from the observation template, during the lesson of teacher ÖĞR1, mostly musical intelligence 
was addressed in the primary (main) activity while mostly verbal intelligence was addressed in 
the secondary activity (question-answer). Considering average time in general during 15 hours of 
teaching process of ÖĞR1 related to the course of Social Studies based on types of the applied 
activities, 18 primary (main) activities took 6 minutes 31 seconds while 71 secondary (question-
answer)  activities  took  1  minute  13  seconds.  During  the  lesson  of  ÖĞR2,  activities  mostly 
addressing verbal intelligence were performed in case of primary (main) activity while activities 
mostly  addressing  verbal  intelligence  were  performed  in  case  of  secondary  activity  (question-
answer) again. Considering general time averages during 15 hours of teaching process of ÖĞR2 
related to the course of Social Studies based on types of the applied activities, 10 primary (main) 
activities  took  9  minutes  18  seconds  while  59  secondary  (question-answer)  activities  took  1 
minute 48 seconds. 
 
Keywords: Social Studies, Multiple Intelligence Theory, Multiple Intelligence applications 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
152   
 
 
 
Professional Standards for Teachers in a Universal Design for Learning 
Framework. Promoting a Data Literate and Reflective Teacher Culture in Greek 
Elementary Schools 
 
Olga Imellou 
olgimellou@gmail.com
 
Aris Charoupias 
 
In order to raise achievement for all students in a Greek elementary school struggling to 
be  inclusive  (PL  4074/2012),  teacher’s  everyday  practice  in  the  classroom  seems  to  balance 
between  failure/frustration  and  success/satisfaction.  Although  initial  teacher  education  of 
practicing  professionals  in  inclusive  pedagogy  issues  can  be  described  as  inadequate,  attempts 
are  being  made  towards  empowering  teachers  through  short  term  in-service  training  programs. 
These  programs  are  mostly  designed  and  implemented  by  school  advisors  who  recognize  the 
mismatch  between  initial  teacher  education  and  the  requirements  for  the  teacher  in  day-to-day 
classroom/school life. For teachers to be able to actively support students overcome the barriers 
to their learning they need to know how to design appealing and motivating classroom learning 
environments  positive  and  supportive  for  all  learners.  They  need  to  have  certain  attitudes, 
knowledge and skills, that form a set of professional standards essential for the implementation 
of a state-of-the-art framework, such as the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). The adoption 
of  a  UDL-like  framework  allows  teachers  to  acknowledge  that  every  student  has  a  unique 
baseline  of  attitudes,  knowledge  and  skills  that  can  be  improved  by  their  practices.  For  the 
teachers’ practices to be effective in a UDL-like framework, they should be formed within a data 
literate  and  reflective  teacher  culture  in  which  every  decision  making  in  the  classroom  is 
informed  by  data  about  the  assessment  of  students’  work  and  by  reflection  concerning  the 
effectiveness  of  previous  teaching  practices.  Finally,  an  example  of  an  in-service  training 
program  is  described.  In  this  program,  a  school  advisor  collaborates  actively,  as  designer  and 
facilitator,  with  teachers  that  take  responsibility  for  data  collecting  and  for  being  reflective 
practitioners. The two-school-years program’s main goal is the promotion of teacher professional 
standards  within  a  UDL-like  framework  with  an  emphasis  on  data  and  reflection.  It  involves 
teaching  and  learning  writing  skills  and  promoting  student  understanding  in  mathematics.  
Although  the  program  is  still  in  progress,  provisional  conclusions  can  be  drawn  for  reflection 
concerning  specific  program  characteristics,  such  as  duration,  pedagogy,  etc.,  for  such 
interventions  to  have  a  lasting  positive  impact  that  could  support  quality  and  accountability  in 
Greek elementary schools. 
 
Keywords:  inclusive  school,  school  advisor,  teacher  culture,  practices,  data,  reflection, 
professional standards, Universal Design for Learning 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
153   
 
 
 
The Role of Head Teacher to Manage Conflicts at Kindergartens 
 
Olga Mpatsoula 
olinam1@gmail.com
 
Glykeria Reppa 
Anastasia Intzevidou 
 
The  present  research  examines  the  phenomenon  of  conflict  that  concerns  educators  in 
kindergarten  schools.  In  particular,  it  attempts  to  explore  the  factors  of  provoking  in-school 
conflicts  among  kindergarten  teachers  and  also  to  investigate  the  positive  and  negative 
consequences that may occur due to these conflicts. To examine the teachers’ attitudes towards 
conflict,  the Everard  and Morris  (1999) model was  used, with  its  five-fold way of coping  with 
conflict;  fighting,  avoiding,  smoothing,  compromising,  and  problem  solving.  In  addition,  the 
research  investigates  the  contribution  of  kindergarten  teachers  and  head  teachers’  demographic 
profile and also the influence of leader’s attitude towards the orientation of conflicts. As far as 
the investigation of the leadership style is concerned, the leadership behavior scale for the school 
principal  (Hoy  &  Clover,  1986)  was  used.  This  specific  scale  distinguishes  leadership  style  in 
three categories; the supportive, the directive and, finally, the restrictive style of leadership. The 
method  used  is  a  quantitative  survey  with  self-report  questionnaires,  which  were  distributed  to 
kinder  garden  teachers  (East  Thes/niki,  West  Thes/niki,  Kastoria,  Evoia).  A  sample  of  139 
teachers  was  obtained.  The  present  investigation  revealed  the  following  results:  The  most 
important factor of conflict orientation is the “the problems’ solution”, there is no differentiation 
of the causes and effects of the conflicts, in terms of kindergarten teachers and kindergarten head 
teachers,  the  demographic  characteristics  play  no  role  in  attitude  choice,  and  finally  the 
supportive  leadership  style  is  chosen,  which  has  a  positive  correlation  with  the  attitudes  of 
problems’ solution, the  smoothing and the compromising. 
 
Keywords:  conflict,  attitudes  towards  conflict,  leadership  style,  kindergarten  teachers, 
schoolmasters 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
154   
 
 
 
The Effect of Compensation Studies on Disadvantaged Children’s Self Concept 
Levels and Locus of Control 
 
Ömür Sadioğlu 
 
 
 
Gönül Onur Sezer 
osadioglu@uludag.edu.tr 
 
Self-concept is a general term used to refesr to how someone thinks about, evaluates 
himself/herself. One of the other important term about human pschology is locus of contol. 
Locus  of  control  refers  to  the  extent  to  which  individuals  believe  they  can  control  events 
affecting  them.  This  study  aims  to  state  the  self  concept  and  the  locus  of  control  of  the 
disadvantaged children. Disadvantaged children those who are in risk from various aspects. 
The  prevention  studies  and  programs  are  to  prevent  the  occurrence  of  situations  that  can 
cause  a  risk  for    the  children  the  future  On  the  other  hand  compensation  studies  help 
forward  to  children  who  encounter  risk  factor  and  are  affected  negatively  such  as  having 
behaviour  problems,  exhibit  social  disharmony.  Compensation  studies  help  her/him 
overcome  this  disharmony  and  behavioral  problems  etc.  In  this  context,  the  aim  of  this 
study is to determine the impact of compensation program which was hold as a University–
Sector Cooperation Project  “Be My Hope Project” between Uludag University  Faculty of 
Education  and  Bursa  Provincial  Security  Directorate’s  Child  Branch  on  disadvantaged 
children’s  self  concept  levels  and  locus  of  control.  The  subjects  of  this  study  are  33 
disadvantaged children (28 boys and 5 girls) who were selected after organizing interviews 
with  counselors  and  directors  of  four  schools  decided  by  Bursa  Provincial  Security 
Directorate’s Child Branch.  Teacher  candidates  from university organized study times for 
academic and social development of disadvantaged children groups.  A questionnaire form 
of  Piers  Harris'  self  concept  scale  and  Nowicki–Strickland  Locus  of  Control  Scale  was 
completed  by  disadvantaged  children  in  this  study.  Piers  Harris'  self  concept  scale  which 
was  adapted  to  Turkish  by  Öner  (1996)  ve  Çataklı  (1985)  includes  80  questions.  The 
reliability  of  scale  changes  between  .78  -  .93.  The  reliability  of  Turkish  form  changes 
between  .81-  .89.  Nowicki–Strickland  Locus  of  Control  Scale  adapted  by  Korkut  (1986).  
This scale consist of 40 “yes” “no” questions. The analysis of this study is still underway. 
 
 
Keywords: Disadvantaged children, self concept, locus of control, compensation study, risk 
factor 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
155   
 
 
 
Phenomenology and Grounded Theory: A Comparison in Terms of Some 
Features 
 
Oya Onat Kocabıyık 
oyaonat2003@yahoo.com
 
 
This  study  aims  to  compare  phenomenology  and  grounded  theory,  which  are  in 
qualitative research methods,  in  respect  of their  some certain  features and the reason why  they 
are  chosen  in  researches.  It  is  stated  that  phenomenological  analysis  is  the  appropriate  method 
that can be used in health, social, education and clinic psychological researches to point how the 
people perceive and understand the meaningful events in their lives (Smith and Eatough, 2007). 
Van  Manen  (1990;  cited  Miller,  2003)  states  in  his  phenomenology  description  as 
phenomenology is  a human science and its purpose is to  describe the  meaning of phenomenon 
and understand the  meanings  of the experiences in  the past.  Grounded theory is  described  as  a 
method  that  discovers  the  theories  directly  from  data,  notions,  hypotheses  and  propositions.  In 
the context of grounded theory, it is supposed that the process is examined and feeling the social 
life in the theoretical way, it is a process itself. In the concept of grounded theory, the exploration 
of the core category, which is grounded in a sense and revolving around the basic social process 
or  all  other  categories,  is  examined  and  therefore,  grounded  theory  is  method  to  develop 
theory/theories  that  explains  the  reason  of  the  behaviors  (Flint,  2005).  Phenomenology  and 
grounded theory are seen as important qualitative research methods, and they are seen necessary 
to  be  addressed  together.  For  this  aim,  in  this  article,  phenomenology  and  grounded  theory 
methods are examined and compared to each other. 
 
Keywords: Phenomen, Phenomenology, Grounded Theory 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
156   
 
 
 
Environmental Influences in Communication of Greek Family: A Comparative 
Case Study 
 
Panagiotis J. Stamatis 
stamatis@rhodes.aegean.gr
 
Athanasios Papanikolaou 
 
In psychological approach communication is perceived as an interpersonal process during 
which a person who intends to transfer a message codes it either through speech or through body
or  through  both  means  and  conveys  it  after  having  further  enriched  it  with  emotional,  beyond 
cognitive,  content.  Thus,  the  psychological  approach  could  be  expressed  in  the  definition: 
“Communication  is  every  recognizable,  conscious  or  unconscious,  intentional  or  unintentional 
behavior  through  which  a  human,  willingly  or  unwillingly  influences  the  perceptions,  feelings, 
emotions, thoughts, and actions of others and vice versa with the aim of mutual understanding.” 
The institutional function of a family simultaneously accomplishes an emotional and a practical 
task so as to  cover timelessly and successfully both the immediate functions and the biological 
needs  of  its  members  and  their  psychological  quests.  Family  communication,  in  a  verbal  or  a 
non-verbal  level,  sustains  and  reinforces  the  bonds  among  the  family  members  ensuring 
timelessness  in  the  family’s  structure  and  cohesion,  despite  the  constantly  altering  social 
environment. Family communication is of vital importance in the training of educators both for 
the  child’s  adjustment  and  its  smooth  procession  through  the  educational  levels,  and  for  the 
satisfaction  of  its  emotional  needs.  Hence,  family  communication  does  not  only  concern  the 
narrow  frames  of  the  family  environment  but  also  the  functions  of  the  educational  system, 
especially  in  the  case  that  it  reflects  the  levels  of  communication  between  school  and  family. 
Within  this  framework,  the  present  research  consists  of  a  comparative  case  study  of 
communicative behaviors  in  four-member families that live in  the areas  of the Greek mainland 
and islands. The aims of the study focus on the types and problems of communication that come 
to  the  surface,  as  well  as  on  the  differences  that  the  non-verbal  communication  of  the  Greek 
family members presents according to their area of living (urban or island natural environment). 
The sample included common characteristics, in order to minimize any statistical contrasts. The 
methodological  approach  consists  of  semi-structured  interviews  with  open  questions,  while 
answers  were  recorded  both  in  writing  and  with  voice  recording  devices.  The  concluding 
statements  of  this  research  compose  a  concrete  image  of  the  influence  that  the  natural 
environment has on family communication, with positive effects on the quality of the nutrition, 
entertainment forms, management of unacceptable children behavior, and on the development of 
interpersonal  relations  amongst  family  members.  Findings  of  this  research  relate  to  quality  of 
school  climate  and  consequently,  to  instructional  effectiveness  which  interests  teachers' 
education and training. 
 
Keywords: 
family 
communication, 
environmental 
education, 
teachers' 
education, 
communication, urban environment, insular environment 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
157   
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling