Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet21/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25

Soft Skills Identification for Guidance and Job Placement 
 
Paola Nicolini 
paola.nicolini@unimc.it
 
Elisa Attili 
Valentina  
Corinaldi 
Monica  
De Chiro 
Cristina Formiconi 
 
Recognition,  validation  and  certification  of  skills,  especially  those  developed  in  non-
formal  and  informal  fields,  is  becoming  a  current  topic  for  all  educative  institutions,  including 
Universities.  This  paper  represents  a  good  practice  of  the  University  of  Macerata  (IT)  in  the 
sector of soft skills. ‘Soft skills’ is a psycho-sociological term relating to a cluster of personality 
traits, social abilities, communication, language, personal attitudes that characterize relationships 
with other people. Soft skills complement hard skills which are the occupational requirements of 
a  job  and  many  other  activities.  To  design  procedures  aimed  at  the  recognition,  validation  and 
certification  of  Soft  skills  through  specific  tasks.  In  Italy,  the  legal  framework  on  recognition, 
validation and certification of skills are led by the Legislative Decree n. 13/13. According to the 
Decree,  University  should  assure  the  effective  implementation  of  lifelong  learning,  a  strategic 
factor for individual fulfilment in work and for social aspects, through guidance and counselling 
services. Several tasks were tested in order to identify a set of activities useful to recognize soft 
skills  such  as  observation,  problem  solving  and  communication  in  small  group.  Each  skill  was 
operationalized  through  the  identification  of  specific  indicators  to  recognize  three  level  of 
expertise;  basic,  intermediate,  advanced.  Applying  such  kind  of  procedures  at  the  secondary 
school  can  be  important  to  support  young  students  both  in  the  field  of  guidance  and  job 
placement. 
 
Keywords:  soft  skills,  lifelong  learning,  informal  learning,  non-formal  learning,  guidance,  job 
placement. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
158   
 
 
 
The Impact of New Technologies in Learning Processes: A Survey In A 2.0 Class 
 
Paola Nicolini 
pao          la.nicolini@unimc.it        
 
 
Idalisa  
Cingolani 
  Monica de Chiro 
Michela Bomprezzi 
Valentina 
Corinaldi 
 
Magda 
Dabrowska 
Cristina 
Formiconi 
Federica  
Papa 
 
 
Throughout the last scholastic year, we have conducted a research monitoring a class of 
11  to  12  years  old  students,  using  tablets  within  the  teaching-learning  daily  interactions  at 
school.  The  aim  of  the  research  was  to  understand  the  impact  of  such  a  technological  device, 
both  on  the  learning  results  and  on  indirect  psycho-sociological  variables  such  as  motivation, 
self-representation,  group  dynamics,  and  use  of  new  technologies  in  extra-school  contexts.  We 
monitored  the  above  variables  in  two  classes:  The  first  class  was  considered  the  experimental 
group and the second was a control group. The two classes were chosen for their similarity while 
ensuring  they  were  independent  each  other;  the  two  classes  were  situated  in  the  same  area 
without direct connections, they had in part the same teachers, and they were constituted by an 
almost equal number of students. We planned an online data collection through questionnaires. 
The survey was conducted during two periods; at the beginning and at the end of the scholastic 
year. This provided us with data to measure potential changes and developments in the variables 
we considered within the two classes. At the beginning of the scholastic year, the control group 
appeared  to  have  advantages  in  each  of  the  variables  considered.  At  the  end  of  the  scholastic 
year, however, the experimental group had better results. This means that the class using tablets 
grew more than the control group. In fact, at the second survey, the students of the experimental 
class  showed;  a  greater  motivation  to  learn,  a  larger  positive  development  in  their  self-
representations, a deeper and more complex dynamics of peer's interaction within the class, and a 
more  frequent  use  of  new  technologies  in  extra-scholastic  contexts.  Our  research  shows  a 
positive  impact  both  on  learning  results  and  on  the  personal  development  of  the  monitored 
students.  The  consequence  of  our  findings  on  teachers  is  that  it  is  urgent  to  train  them  in  the 
correct use of technological devices within the teaching-learning interactions. We are not merely 
referring to the introduction of a new tool, moreover to a deep change in the role of teachers, no 
longer thought as a dispenser of information, but as a cultural mediator. 
 
Keywords:  learning technologies, learning strategies, teaching strategies, learning and web, 2.0 
generation, hypermedia in education. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
159   
 
 
 
Early Childhood Teachers’ Didactical Approaches in Science Teaching and 
Their Comparison with Curriculum Guidelines 
 
 
Paraskevi Kavalari 
evkavala@uth.gr
 
Domna-Mika Kakana 
 
The present research is motivated by the concern that teachers often resist changing their 
role in the classroom, resulting in a significant inconsistency between the official curriculum and 
the  applied  curriculum.  When  it  comes  to  Greek  early  childhood  education,  a  number  of 
adjustments during the last 25 years have generated certain dissimilarity among early childhood 
educators regarding the curriculum  they have studied and implemented. We encounter teachers 
of  three  categories;  those  who  have  studied  and  applied  the  new  curriculum,  those  who  have 
studied the old but applied the current curriculum and others who have studied the old and have 
applied  both  curricula.  In  the  present  study,  we  intended  to  include  participants  of  all  three 
categories. The main purpose of the research was to reveal the methodological characteristics of 
the didactical approach of two science concepts  (evaporation and sinking/floating) in preschool 
classrooms  and  to  discover  to  what  extend  the  approach  is  influenced  by  teachers’  curriculum 
familiarization.  The  present  research  was  organized  in  two  stages:  During  Stage  1  data  were 
collected from 30 preschool teachers, through semi-structured interviews. The main objective of 
the interviews was to reveal the way preschool teachers usually approach both science concepts, 
the  degree  they  intend  to  implement  contemporary  didactical  approaches  and  to  detect  their 
familiarization  with  recent  curricula.  During  stage  2,  we  performed  8  in-classroom  systematic 
observations  of  the  approach  of  evaporation  and  sinking/floating  with  teachers  of  all  three 
categories.  The  objective  of  the  observations  was  to  reveal  the  distance  between  the  official 
curriculum  and  the  applied  curriculum  regarding  the  methodological  characteristics  of  the 
approach  of  the  two  concepts.  The  content  analysis  of  the  recorded  material  (interviews  and 
observations) was based in both preset and emergent categories. Data were not faced as simple 
variables;  they  are  rather  examined  flexibly,  through  an  interpretive  perspective  in  order  to 
compose  a  more  complete  image.  The  results  show  a  high  level  of  inconsistency  between 
teaching  practice  and  the  guidelines  of  the  current  curriculum,  and  attachment  to  previous 
curricula and techniques even for the new teachers. Small differences between the three teachers’ 
categories were detected and they showed that the approaches of teachers who were familiar with 
both curricula were more consistent with the current curriculum. 
 
Keywords: science teaching, early childhood, teachers' practice 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
160   
 
 
 
Metacognitive Process and Evaluation 
 
 
Paraskevi Dimou 
dimouparaskevi.edu@gmail.com
 
Aikaterini Kasimati 
Xanthipi Sourti 
 
The development of educational work has highlighted the need to foster plurality in terms 
of  skills  training  in  order  to  be  able  to  meet  the  demands  of  the  educational  process.  The 
teacher’s role is under constant change, as it is needed to be reshaped, so that students on the one 
hand can be provided with more creative learning tools and on the other hand evolve themselves 
dynamically  as  professionals  (Day,  2003).  The  teacher’s  position  as  rapporteur  transformed 
putting  him  as  a  mentor  and  facilitator  in  the  acquisition  of  new  knowledge  (Chatzigeorgiou, 
2001).  This  involves  two-way  capability  cultivation  metacognitive  skills  and  their  use  in 
authentic  learning  contexts.  In  typical  school  environments,  students  are  addicted  in 
memorization  sterile  knowledge  finding  difficulties  in  reformulating  existing  knowledge  or 
'build' new. This happens because they do not realize authentic learning processes, so their quest 
becomes laborious  and fruitless.  The possibility,  therefore, to  develop  metacognitive skills  will 
contribute  to  conscious  knowledge  and  awareness  of  their  personal  learning  mode  so  knowing 
when  a  goal  is  reached  and  when  not.  Special  attention  is  paid  to  learning  "How  do  I  learn?" 
rather than content "What do I learn?". So, talking about metacognition of what we are interested 
in is what knowledge someone knows, remembers and thinks» (Metcalfe & Shimamura, 1994). 
For this purpose, a variety of tools can be used, with which students will practice in this process 
having  active  involvement  in  the  learning  process.  Such  tools  are  the  diary  log  of  their  daily 
activities (Sofos, 2010) that will contribute to the cultivation of metacognitive skills to constantly 
improve  their  effectiveness  (Matsagouras,  2000)  and  self-assessment  based  on  criteria  for 
achieving their goals (Marzano, Pickering & Pollock , 2004). It is also possible for the teacher to 
use evaluation tools which highlight the usefulness of this procedure and the continuous progress 
of students, such as various tests, portfolio, rubrics and self-assessment questionnaires and other-
assessment. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the cultivation strategies of metacognitive 
skills as well as factors affecting them. In addition, an indicative teaching scenario is utilized to 
implement  the  metacognitive  process  to  students  and  the  alternative  evaluation  with  various 
modern  techniques  beyond  the  formal  examinations,  in  order  to  give  and  reshape  the  teaching 
act.  Finally,  proposals  for  the  continuous  professional  development  of  teachers  and 
transformation of their role towards pupils are submitted. 
 
Keywords: Cultivation skills, metacognition, techniques, assessment tools, transformation. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
161   
 
 
 
Teacher Development Program in Preventing and Dealing with School Violence 
and Bullying 
 
Potoula - Spyridoula Vasileiou 
potvasil@yahoo.gr
 
 
Antisocial  and  diverging  behavior  of  students  in  school  environment,  whether  that  is 
demonstrated violently or not, is a complex phenomenon and a difficult one to examine. It is also 
worrying,  with  multiple  negative  consequences  within  the  school  environment  and  the 
community,  in  general.  According  to  the  above,  the  school  has  to  play  an  important  role  in 
preventing  and  dealing  with  antisocial  and  diverging  behavior.  Our  main  interest  should  be  in 
primary  prevention  which  aims  at  developing  the  necessary  conditions  and  providing  better 
terms for a successful socialization. This program applies to every teacher in Educational Region 
of Primary Teaching and is based on adult education principles and distance learning methods. It 
will take place within the frame of combined learning, meaning that it will include live seminars 
and  distance  learning  and  it  will  develop  in  three  aspects:  a)  cognition,  b)  practice  and  c) 
remediation.  The  aim  of  the  program  is  to  reveal  the  importance  of  school  in  preventing  and 
dealing  with  school  violence  and  bullying,  by  exploiting  the  cognitive  subject  of  School  and 
Social  Life.  The  goal  of  the  cognitive  subject  of  the  School  and  Social  Life  is  to  place  the 
students  in  the  center  of  the  changes  without  discriminations  and  inequalities  in  order  to  be 
improved in every aspect. SSL may work in a level of primary prevention, by strengthening the 
mental  resilience  of  individuals  and  systems  and  providing  the  students  with  new  skills  and 
knowledge.  The  program  will  last  three  years,  a  necessary  time  period  as  it  aims  at  changing 
attitudes  and  encouraging  self-exploration,  remediation  and  cooperation.  In  the  first  year,  the 
teachers  in  charge  of  Prevention  of  School  Violence  and  Bullying  will  take  part  in  the  teacher 
development  program,  in  the  second  year  they  will  pass  their  knowledge  through  their  school 
units  and  in  the  third  year  a  development  of  contact  and  cooperation  networks  is  scheduled 
between school communities within the Region. The point is that every school unit must work as 
a  small  community  of  practice  and  a  cooperation  culture  must  develop  within  the  school 
community but also between schools throughout the Region. 
 
Keywords: teacher development program, school violence, bullying 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
162   
 
 
 
Evaluation of an e-Course Platform by Early Childhood Education Students 
 
Rosita Tsoni 
rozitson@yahoo.gr
 
Vicky Nikolaou 
Jenny Pange 
 
All  universities  worldwide  use  online  platforms  as  educational  material  repositories  or 
provide courses. The evaluation of the courses is crucial in order to reinsure their quality. Both 
experts’  evaluation,  as  well  as  students’  feedback,  is  needed  as  they  can  provide  useful 
information for the courses’ improvement. Studies have revealed that the evaluation of an online 
course  can  indicate  factors  that  influence  learners’  success.  In  the  present  study  e-courses’ 
learning  material  was  used  in  order  to  implement  a  blended  learning  method  for  teaching 
undergraduates  of  School  of  Education.    This  material  had  a  license  under  the  “Creative 
Commons” licensing system. Thus, it is open to everyone to see and to use under certain terms 
and  conditions.  At  the  end  of  the  semester,  students  evaluated  the  online  course  and  their 
learning experience. In conclusion, students found this learning experience effective as they had 
the  opportunity  to  participate  in  an  interactive  procedure  instead  of  the  typical  face  to  face 
lecture. Moreover, the flexibility of video as a learning tool allowed them to pause, rewind and 
review video-lectures according to their learning needs.  This flexibility was stressed as the main 
benefit  of  the  online  course.  However,  they  would  like  to  have  more  online  interaction 
opportunities  especially  through  social  media.  Finally,  they  proposed  some  technical 
modifications that they believed that would improve the course. 
 
Keywords: e- course, blended learning, students' evaluation 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
163   
 
 
 
The Historical Novel: Towards an Alternative Approach of History Teaching 
 
Rosy Aggelaki 
aggelaki.rosy@gmail.com
 
 
Teaching History within the school walls targets at presenting principal historical facts to 
pupils and simultaneously at rendering pupils’ perception of History acute whilst molding their 
historical  conscience.  Nevertheless,  the  materialization  of  these  didactic  aims  along  with  the 
conceptualization of the notions of “time” and of geographic element, or even the evolutionary 
process  that  takes  place  in  everyday  life  throughout  the  passage  of  years  might  face  an 
impediment  from  time  to  time;  there  seems  to  be  a  contradiction  between  those  very  didactic 
aims  and  the  History  teaching  methods  that  make  the  lesson  rather  tedious.  The  Teaching  of 
History as a field aims at making us have further thoughts over the very texture of teaching itself 
overall and over the teaching of the particular subject as well. History teaching methods propose 
ways  via  which  the  educator  is  bound  to  acquaint  him  /  herself  with  History  in  a  multi  –  fold 
approach. In effect, this will result in being reverberated in his / her potential in teaching History 
lessons.  After  all,  according  to  the  modern  trend  of  the  new  curricula,  History  lessons  are 
founded on dialogical methodology and they tend to be interactive. In what way may pupils avail 
of  the  use  of  historical  realia  (authentic  or  replicas)  and  the  use  of  pictures  /  photographs  in 
History  school  classes?  How  will  pupils  benefit  from  such  a  use  of  realia  in  favor  of  their 
linguistic and intellectual  competence? How should educators act towards  this direction? What 
do today’s educators select  as the most effective way to  delve into the historical  or /  and local 
continuities and discontinuities? Do they opt for a documentary projection or do they choose the 
presentation of up to date photographical / pictionary material? Do educators select both of these 
methods? Furthermore, except for the fore - mentioned methods, do teachers believe that visits 
of  educational  hue,  such  as  a  visit  to  the  museum,  educate  pupils  much  more  effectively  by 
providing  them  with  food  for  thought  and  by  inciting  them  to  sharpen  their  acumen.  An 
alternative  approach  of  historical  knowledge  is  considered  to  be  Literature  and  particularly  via 
the Historical Novel. Contemporary educators admit that there are relationships of intertextuality 
between  Literature  and  History.  Moreover  contemporary  educators  believe  that  in  this 
intertextuality  are  embedded  the  goals  set  for  the  pupils’  critical  cross  –  cultural  tutoring. 
Historical  novels,  apart  from  the  fictional  element  that  they  entail,  they  are  founded  on  factual 
truths  which  the  literary  author  has  researched  into  historical  data  and  sources.  Given  that  the 
educator in the context of the History class highlights the footnotes to his / her pupils, the latter 
get acquainted with these social constructs and they are encouraged into realizing that Literature 
constitutes  a  source  for  History  itself,  whilst  History  forms  evidence  for  Literature.  As  a 
consequence,  does  a  cohesive  historical  knowledge  constitute  the  presence  of  historical  reality 
and  the  linguistic  /  narrative  representation  of  the  social  imaginary  that  is  shaped  within  the 
historical  novel?  This  announcement  examines  thoroughly  this  issue  by  laying  particular 
emphasis on the teaching of Byzantine History in today’s School with the aid of Literature. 
 
Keywords: Teaching History, History and story / narrative, Historical Novel 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
164   
 
 
 
In-Service Trainings of Teachers in Turkey and Japan 
 
Sabiha Öztürk 
sbh068@gmail.com
 
 
This  study  aimed  to  examine  in-service  training  programs  for  teachers  in  Turkey  and 
Japan and reveal similarities and differences between them. In the study, documents related to in-
service trainings in these countries were examined and the results obtained were compared. All 
of  such  activities  as  “development  programs”  intended  for  teachers  and  “adaptation  and 
candidateship trainings” and “seminar works” carried out for candidate teachers in Turkey can be 
evaluated within the scope of in-service training. In Turkey, in-service trainings for teachers are 
usually  planned  by  the  central  organization  of  the  ministry  and  provincial  directorates  for 
national  education  and  carried  out  via  using  the  method  of  distant  education  and  face-to-face 
training  methods.  However,  in  Japan,  every  year  about  5000  teachers  are  sent  abroad  by  the 
government  within  the  framework  of  in-service  training  programs.  Moreover,  in  in-service 
trainings  held  locally,  Provincial  Education  Committees  plan  and  perform  in-service  training 
courses  for  teachers.  In  Japan,  in  in-service  trainings  for  teachers,  two  different  programs  are 
applied; namely basic training and specialization training programs. Teachers take “first teaching 
training” in the first year of their professional career and ‘experienced teacher training’ and ‘mid-
career teacher training’ in the fifth, tenth and fifteenth years of their professional careers. In the 
twentieth  year  of  their  profession,  only  heads  of  education  departments  at  schools  are  given 
‘school  management  training’.  “Specialization  trainings”  include  various  direct  in-service 
training courses for teachers who want to become experts in their fields or certain subjects. These 
courses are planned and carried out by local training centers to achieve certain goals.  From the 
findings  obtained  from  the  documents  examined,  it  is  observed  that  teachers  in  both  countries 
take  candidateship  training  in  the  first  years  of  their  profession.  In  both  countries,  there  are 
compulsory in-service trainings for teachers. However, in Japan, there is a compulsory in-service 
training program for teachers based on teaching career steps once every five years. On the other 
hand,  while,  in  Turkey,  seminar  works  are  held  at  schools  at  the  beginning  and  end  of  every 
educational  year,  in  Japan,  these  trainings  are  generally  given  at  training  centers.  While  in-
service trainings are planned locally in Japan, they are planned centrally in Turkey. 
 
Keywords: Teacher, In-Service Training, Japan, Turkey 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling