Abstract book


Download 5.07 Kb.

bet24/25
Sana10.02.2017
Hajmi5.07 Kb.
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25

 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
179   
 
 
 
The Relationship between Work-Life Balance and Life Satisfaction among 
Teachers in Turkish Public Schools 
 
Turgut Karaköse 
tkarakose@yahoo.com
 
Kürşad Yilmaz 
Yahya Altinkurt 
Orhan Murat Kalfa 
 
In today’s information era, the distinction between the individual's family-life and work-
life dimensions has been growing even bigger. When examined from the teachers’ point of view; 
in  order  to  enable  quality  and  efficiency  in  education,  it  is  important  that  teachers  achieve 
balancing their work-life and family-life. Thus, it is  important  to determine the effect  of work-
life balance on life satisfaction of teachers. The purpose of this study is to identify whether there 
is  a  relationship  between  work-life  balance  and  life  satisfaction  of  teachers.  This  study  was 
designed  according  to  the  relational  survey  model.  The  sample  of  the  study  consisted  of  281 
teachers working in Kütahya, Turkey. Study data was collected with Work-Life Balance Scale 
(Netenmeyer,  Boles  and  McMurrian,  1996)  and  Life  Satisfaction  Scale  (Diener,  1985).  The 
“Work-Life  Balance  Scale”  consists  of  two  sub-scales  aiming  at  measuring  “work-family 
conflict” levels that are due to work life and “family-work conflict” levels that are due to family 
life.  Together  with  descriptive  statistics  aiming  at  identifying  teacher  opinions,  a  “Multiple 
Regression  Analysis”  was  conducted  in  order  determine  whether  there  is  a  significant 
relationship between the work-life balance of teachers and their life satisfaction rates. According 
to  the  result  of  this  study  which  examined  the  effects  of  work-life  balance  of  teachers  on  their 
life  satisfactions;  life  satisfaction  levels  of  teachers  were  a  little  over  “medium  degree”.  The 
work-life  balance  of  teachers  who  participated  in  the  study  was  observed  to  be  at  a  “medium” 
degree. Based on this data, it can be asserted that teachers have a “medium degree” of work-life 
balance and again a “medium degree” of life satisfaction. According to the analysis, there is a 
significant  difference  between  work-life  balances  of  teachers  regarding  the  gender  variable; 
however, no statistical significant differences were observed for the other variables of the study. 
In  addition,  there  were  no  significant  differences  between  life  satisfaction  rates  of  teachers 
regarding the other variables. At the  final  stage of the study, the effect  of work-life balance of 
teachers  on  their  life  satisfaction  was  analyzed  with  the  Pearson  correlation  analysis  and 
according  to  the  results;  there  is  a  positive  way  significant  relationship  between  work-family 
conflicts  and family-work conflicts  of teachers; but  there is  no significant relationship  between 
work-family conflicts and life satisfactions of teachers. In addition, according to the correlation 
analysis, there is a negative way significant relationship between family-work conflicts and life 
satisfaction of teachers. 
 
Keywords: Work-Life Balance, Life satisfaction, Teachers, Public Schools 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
180   
 
 
 
Issues and Tools for Quality Food Education at School 
 
Valentina Corinaldi 
valentina.corinaldi@gmail.com
 
 
Food education is becoming a central topic and it will be even more so during this year, 
thanks to Expo 2015, whose topic is "Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life". Eating is a complex 
act  that  deals  with  individual,  political,  social  and  cultural  dimensions.  The  school  and  the 
educational institutions should take on this new challenge. The purpose of this project is to give 
teachers and educators effective tools for food education. The theoretical framework is based on 
Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory. Howard Gardner (1983) identifies eight types of human 
intelligence  able  to  solve  problems  and  to  produce  appreciable  performance  in  the  cultural 
background.  Each  intelligence  type  can  help  in  dealing  with  important  issues  related  to  food, 
using  different  types  of  problem  solving.  The  experimental  project  CulturAAlimentazione, 
aimed to promote a food education model at Primary school based on a narrative approach. The 
project  produced  the  first  result,  the  Manifesto  for  conscious  education  of  children  in  families 
and  school  contexts,  written  by  the  University  of  Macerata  and  the  Laboratorio  delle  Idee 
Company. The Manifesto has inspired a second project called Edueat that provides tools like the 
play book Aggiungi un gioco a tavola. It is composed of two smaller books, one for adults and 
the other one for children. The purpose of the book is to transmit food education through playful 
and sensory approach; in fact, it proposes some activities that children can achieve together with 
their parents, using the senses. The third result is the senses intelligence table that explains some 
activities crossing every intelligence type with the sensorial abilities. Every activity is based on 
sensory exploration of food through several student skills. For that reason the table could become 
a useful teaching-learning tool at school to promote healthy and conscious eating. Currently the 
project  is  going  on  through  field  testing  of  the  activities  based  on  the  book  with  children  and 
training courses for teacher and parents, to diffuse good practice about food education.   
 
Keywords: Food education, Multiple Intelligences, senses, playful approach 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
181   
 
 
 
Does the Adult Educator Need a Personal Educational Philosophy? 
 
Vasiliki Karavakou 
vkm@uom.edu.gr
 
Genovefa Papadima 
 
This  paper  aims  to  highlight  (a)  the  reasons  for  which  the  adult  educator  should  be 
mindful of the broader philosophical framework governing their thought and practice as well as 
(b)  how  the  adult  educator  can  reclaim  it  in  the  educational  process.  Coupling  educational 
philosophy and educational practice is necessary as theory without practice leads to an excessive 
and  sterile  idealism,  whilst  practice  without  its  theoretical  underpinnings  leads  to  malign 
empiricism and unreflective activism. The determination of the personal educational philosophy 
enables the adult educator to acquire conscious knowledge of the reasons for which they uphold 
certain  convictions  and  evaluations,  to  further  develop  critical  thinking  and  insight,  to  ascribe 
meaning  to  and  control  their  educational  choices  and  teaching  methods  and  intervene  (if 
possible)  in  the  curriculum.  The  issue  of  the  contribution  of  one’s  personal  educational 
philosophy  to  the  educational  process  branches  into  a  series  of  other,  equally  important,  issues 
about the aims of education itself, the role of the educator, the learner and the learning process, 
the  influence  that  is  exercised  upon  them  by  particular  cultural  affiliations  and  finally,  the  fact 
that  each  learner  may  indeed  follow  a  personal  educational  philosophy.  Any  review  of  the 
relevant  literature  reveals  that  these  issues  are  investigated  by  several  questionnaires,  some  of 
which  focus  on  the  importance  of  learning  strategies  (PALS,  Conti,  1978;  ATLAS,  Conti  & 
Colody,  2004),  whilst  others  research  the  effect  that  personal  educational  philosophy  has  upon 
educational practice (PHIL, Conti, 2007; PAEI, Zinn, 1983). More adequately than any other the 
PAEI questionnaire by  Zinn  aspires  to  highlight  the personality of the educator and investigate 
their  critical  awareness,  the  possibility  of  adopting  alternative  approaches  in  the  planning  of 
educational programs and teaching methodology and the realizability of the educator’s broader 
evaluative goals. This paper investigates the methodological and interpretative virtues of Zinn’s 
questionnaire  in  the  context  of  a  broader  reflection  on  the  contribution  of  one’s  personal 
educational  philosophy  to  the  educational  process  and  practice.  It  is  worth  noting  that  the 
determination of the personal educational philosophy is not sufficient for resolving the problems 
modern adult educators have to face. Evidently, the proper institutional arrangements, social and 
educational  policies  as  well  as  a  broader  culture  about  adult  learning  should  be  in  place. 
Nevertheless,  being  mindful  of  the  kind  of  educational  philosophy  that  underlies  educational 
practices  constitutes  a  clearly  and  undeniably  necessary  precondition  for  the  adult  educator’s 
effective response to all modern challenges. 
 
Keywords: educational philosophy, adult educator, self-evaluation, teaching and learning 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
182   
 
 
 
Development of Intercultural Attitudes and Values in the Greek Students with 
the Teaching of Language and Literature. A Comparative Approach in the 
Curricula of 2003 and 2011 
 
Vasiliki Mitropoulou 
mitro@theo.auth.gr
 
Maria Anagnostopoulou 
 
In  today’s  Greek  schools,  special  emphasis  is  given  to  intercultural  education,  which 
refers to the enrichment of educational approaches with teaching and pedagogical practices that 
aim to promote peaceful coexistence and equal opportunities to all pupils, independently of their 
cultural  origin.  The  principles  of  intercultural  education  are  diffused  in  the  aims,  goals  and 
contents of the –in use- Curricula of 2003 and the new Pilot Curricula of 2011. Our aim in this 
work was to notice the extent to which both Curricula (2003 and 2011) took into consideration 
the  cultural  diversity  in  the  classrooms  and  particularly,  to  investigate  how  they  promoted  the 
values  of  respect,  tolerance,  equality  and  solidarity  in  the  pupils’  attitudes.  Additionally,  we 
aimed  to  compare  the  two  Curricula,  as  concerns  their  contribution  to  the  principles  of 
intercultural education. We focused our research on the courses of Greek Language-Literature at 
Primary  and  Secondary  Education,  in  both  Curricula  of  2003  and  2011.  Specifically,  we 
analyzed  the  cognitive  content,  the  proposed  teaching  methods  and  activities,  as  well  as  the 
interdisciplinary projects and teaching scenarios. The data drawn from our investigation (words, 
sentences, paragraphs) was firstly analyzed and then categorized into the following categories: 1. 
Information  /  understanding  of  the  "others"  living  in  Greece  and  abroad.  2.  Interaction, 
communication, co-operation with the "others" who live abroad. 3. Interaction with the "others" 
in  Greece  -  Intercultural  Education  (conditions  and  procedures  in  Education  so  as  to  achieve 
coexistence, acceptance, cooperation, inclusion). 4. Values / attitudes / skills that are promoted in 
the Curricula, and contribute to the equality among people in multicultural societies. Some of the 
important  key  terms  that  have  been  included  in  the  listed  categories  are;  multicultural  society, 
equality  of  cultures,  egalitarianism,  respect  of  rights,  integration  of  foreigners,  co-existence, 
intercultural conscience. Upon completion of this research phase, a tentative attempt was made 
to compare our findings and present which of the two Curricula focused on and promoted more 
the intercultural needs. 
 
Keywords: intercultural values, intercultural attitudes, curricula, cultural integration, co-
existence 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
183   
 
 
 
Perspectives and Limitations of Action Research in Teacher Change: The Effect 
Of EC Teachers’ Initial Beliefs and Practices Regarding Children’s Participation 
 
Vassiliki Alexiou 
alexiouvaso7@gmail.com
 
Sofia Avgitidou 
 
This  study  aims  to  highlight  the  processes  and  outcomes  of  a  collaborative  action 
research  project  in  relation  to  the  initial  beliefs  and  practices  of  participating  teachers  that 
formulate  their  different  profiles.  Specifically,  by  teacher  profile  we  mean  a  combination  of 
teachers’ beliefs regarding the aims of education, the organization of the learning process, their 
understanding of children’s characteristics and abilities and of their educational practices related 
to these beliefs. Action research has been widely discussed as an effective methodology for the 
support of teachers’ reflection and improvement of practice (Altrichter, Posch & Somekh 2001). 
However,  little  attention  has  been  given  to  the  examination  of  action  research  differentiated 
processes  or  outcomes  in  relation  to  the  different  profiles  of  the  participating  teachers.  The 
research  draws  from  an  18-month  action  research  aiming  to  support  12  early  childhood  (EC) 
teachers in rethinking and improving their practices regarding young children’s participation in 
decision making. Observations of both free and structured activities, interviews with EC teachers 
in  the  beginning  and  end  of  action  research,  recorded  structured  activities,  individual  and 
collective  meetings  and  children’s  interviews  and  drawings  were  all  used  as  data  collection 
methods.  The analysis of initial  teacher interviews and observations  of practice identified three 
different teacher profiles among these 12 participating EC teachers in relation to a participatory 
educational process.  The first teacher profile was related to beliefs and practices that supported 
and  encouraged  children’s  wide  participation  during  both  free  and  structured  activities.  The 
second profile was related to a contradiction among what the teacher claimed (children’s active 
participation)  and  what  the  teacher  was  observed  to  encourage  in  the  classroom  (children’s 
limited  participation  in  decision  making).  The  third  profile  related  to  limited  margins  for 
children’s participation in the daily educational process both stated by the teacher and observed 
in practice. Resistance to change beliefs and practices through the course of action research was 
also  differentiated  and  concerned  either  issues  related  to  the  feasibility  to  organize  daily 
education as a participatory process or to issues related to children’s ability to actively participate 
in decision making. This paper will show how the processes of support as well as the outcomes 
of action research were differentiated according to the three teacher profiles.  Discussion of these 
results  aims  to  clarify  that  while  action  research  is  a  flexible  and  adaptable  methodology  to 
support teachers rethink, improve or change their actions according to their needs, questions and 
initial beliefs and practices, it does not necessarily have the same outcomes for all participating 
teachers. 
 
Keywords:  collaborative  action  research,  children’s  participation,  educational  profile,  case 
studies 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
184   
 
 
 
Teacher Education on Human Rights 
 
Vassilis Pantazis 
pantazisv@uth.gr
 
Efpraxia Triantafyllou 
Georgia Pantazi 
 
The human rights can be promoted and implemented through education, training and the 
bodies  of  socialization.  The  educations  of  human  rights  contribute  to  the  realization  of  the 
injustice in the world  and distinguish fair from unfair. Therefore, if the state wants prospective 
citizens to understand, defend and respect human rights, it has to change its educational purpose 
and  method  of  teaching.  Specifically,  it  should  seek  the  introduction  and  analysis  of  human 
rights  at  all  grades  of  education.  Furthermore,  it  should  properly  prepare  the  educational 
community, which will play an important role in the realization of human rights. Moreover, the 
teacher is the one who should actively participate in the struggle for human rights and to develop 
a  more  humane  and  just  fullness.  But  what  happens  in  Greece?  Does  the  Greek  educational 
system provide for the involvement of students in human rights? Has the educational community 
has  received  adequate  training?  The  present  study  tried  to  give  answers  to  these  questions.  In 
particular, we conducted a research with a view to investigating the knowledge and attitudes of 
Greek teachers for the education of human rights. The empirical part of this study pursued two 
objectives:  Our  first  objective  was  to  collect  data  on  the  implementation  of  human  rights 
education  in  Greek  schools.  The  second  objective  was  to  analyze  the  important  practices  for 
teaching  human  rights.  Regarding  the  survey  sample,  teachers  of  both  primary  and  secondary 
education participated  (Primary, Secondary, High). Finally, the  results showed the weakness of 
the  Greek  education  system  to  promote  human  rights.  Indicatively,  our  research  revealed  the 
weaknesses were teachers in effective teaching of human rights and in connection with specific 
references from the daily life of those involved. These weaknesses largely appear to be due to a 
lack of compulsory courses on education rights in the Greek education departments and the lack 
of good information - training of practicing teachers. 
 
Keywords: Education, Human Rights, Training 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3
rd
 ISNITE 2015 International Symposium’ ‘New Issues on Teacher Education’ ‘September 11-13, 2015, University of Thessaly, Volos-Greece          
185   
 
 
 
The Teacher Path to ICT Integration Seen Through the TPACK Lens: The 
Critical Role of Awareness of the Learning Challenge 
 
Vassilis Kollias 
vkollias@uth.gr
 
Ilias Karasavvidis 
 
As  a  model,  TPACK  (Koehler  &  Mishra  2009)  represents  the  different  types  of 
knowledge teachers need in order to integrate ICT in their practices and realize their potential. It 
can therefore establish a shared language for discussing teacher professional development along 
the line of ICT integration. Krauskopf et al. (Krauskopf et al 2015) have recently addressed how 
TPCK  could  be  used  to  map  teacher  professional  development  along  ICT  integration  giving 
emphasis on the processes of teacher learning. In the current study, we used self-reported maps 
of  projected  professional  development  to  highlight  barriers  along  this  path.  Twenty  seven 
graduate  students  in  a  graduate  program  focusing  on  educational  leadership  participated  in  the 
study.  The  participants  had  a  bachelor  degree  leading  to  a  career  either  as  primary  or  as 
secondary  education teachers. Half of them had  extensive teaching  experience while the others 
had  no  prior  teaching  experience.  In  an  introductory  lesson  on  the  use  of  ICT  in  teaching,  the 
students  were  introduced  to  the  TPACK  model.  Then  they  were  asked  to  use  the  TPACK 
categories in order to  report their own projected professional trajectory towards mastering high 
quality  ICT integration in their classrooms.  Data analysis used the written reports produced by 
the  students  and  focused  mainly  on  a)  the  teachers’  perceived  starting  point  of  professional 
development, b) the teachers’ perceived knowledge deficiencies and c) their perceived pathways 
of professional progress. The majority of the participants (19 out of 27), independently from the 
educational level they taught at and their prior classroom teaching experience reported explicitly 
Pedagogical  Knowledge  and  Content  Knowledge  as  secure  foundations  (starting  points).  The 
majority  (22  out  of  27)  reported  also  explicitly  Technological  Knowledge  as  their  main 
deficiency and described a learning trajectory which would include acquaintance with software 
and fitting of the software to prior pedagogical competence. Teachers with no extended teaching 
experience as yet, highlighted the importance of assessing their ICT efforts, using trial and error, 
in  order  to  gradually  arrive  at  the  optimal  use  of  ICT.  The  implication  is  that  both  novice  and 
experienced teachers in primary and secondary education embark on the ICT integration journey 
with  little  awareness  that  they  will  have  to  fundamentally  transform  their  teaching  practices  to 
realize the potential of technology. The result is in accordance with recent research on barriers of 
ICT integration even for highly qualified teachers who misconstrue the transformative challenge 
of technologies (Karasavvidis & Kollias 2014). 
 
Keywords: TPACK, ICT integration, learning 
 
 
 
 
 

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling