"impact of european union public procurement legislation on the albanian public procurement system" republika e shqip


Download 5.49 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet5/44
Sana03.12.2017
Hajmi5.49 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44

2015 
 
 
29 
 
It  might  happen  that  a  tight  regulation  at  the  contract  award  stage  can  be 
undermined,  if  there  is  no  adequate  control  of  the  contract  execution  stage
30
.  First, 
without  careful  management  and  oversight  of  the  execution  of  the  contract,  the 
fraudulent  behavior  can  be  carried  over  into the  execution  stage.  Secondly, even when 
the  procuring  entity  is  behaving  honestly,  the  bidder  may  bid  deliberately  low  and 
then  seek  to  manipulate  the  contract  execution  phase  to  obtain  better  terms    (for 
example,  by  refusing  to  perform  without  extra  payments,  with  the  potential  to 
cause  great  inconvenience  to  the  procuring  entity).  This  is  one  of  the  reasons  why 
changes to a contract  made  during  the  execution  phase  may  sometimes  be  required  by 
procurement  laws  to  constitute  a  “new”  contract  that  must  be  retendered,  as 
mentioned  above.  However,  changes  made  during  the  execution  phase  are  often 
harder  to  monitor  than violations  of  rules  that govern  the  contract  award  phase,  since 
other  suppliers  will  not  be  policing the process in the same way as during a tendering 
procedure
31

 
1.1.1.b. The economic aspects of the public procurement system 
 
Procurement regulation has been developed largely by societies, which rely on concepts 
based  on  welfare  economics  in  the  market  economy  and  is  currently  being  adopted  in 
societies,  which  are  embracing  a  market  economy.  The  development  of  procurement 
regulations  within  a  market  economy  implies  that  its  purpose  is  in  some  way  an 
instrument of the pursuit of economic welfare. In a market economy, economic welfare is 
achieved, in part by pursuing the objective of economic or “allocative” efficiency. This, 
in turns, gives rise to further considerations. First, regulation can be seen as an attempt to 
correct  market  and  institutional  failures  in  order  to  achieve  the  goal  of  economic 
efficiency. Secondly, this goal may be seen as insufficient  in itself to achieve economic 
welfare because it is based on the assumption that optimal economic welfare will result 
from  the  perfect  functioning  of  the  free  market  and  the  achievement  of  allocative 
efficiency. But economic “welfare” may, however, be seen as something more than pure 
allocative efficiency. Thirdly, economic welfare may be formulated with the intention of 
achieving  specific  economic,  social  and  political  objectives,  which  will  have  an  impact 
on  the  formulation  of  those  instruments  of  policy  employed  to  achieve  economic 
efficiency.
32
 On the other hand, the public procurement process aims the management of 
public  funds
33
.  Most  obviously,  both  public  and  private  procurement  has  a  main 
                                       
30
 See,  for  example,  Auricchio,  “The  Problem  of  Discrimination  and  Anti-competitive  Behavior  in  the 
Execution Phase of Public Contracts” (1998) 7 Public Procurement Law Review, pg.113. 
31
  See  S.  Arrowsmith  “Public  Procurement:  Basic  Concepts  and  the  Coverage  of  Procurement  Rules”, 
Public 
Procurement 
Regulation-an 
introduction, 
pg. 
1, 
Available 
on-line 
at 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pprg/documentsarchive/asialinkmaterials/publicprocurementregulationintrod
uction.pdf
. Retrieved on, 20.12.2014.   
32
  P.  Trepte  “Regulating  Procurement-  understanding  the  ends  and  means  of  public  procurement 
regulation”, Oxford University Press Inc., New York, 2004 (reprinted in 2006), pg.63-64. 
33
 See article 3, point 4/a of PPL. 

Impact of European Union public procurement legislation  
on the Albanian public procurement system  
2015 
 
 
30 
 
objective of obtaining value for money, and both public and private purchasers are want 
to ensure an efficient procurement process
34
. Speaking about public funds in the sense of 
procurement processes, usually it means the fund at disposal of a contracting authority to 
conclude a public contract. As a matter of fact, public funds that are “spent” at the end of 
a procurement process are not only those funds needed for the conclusion of the contract 
with  the  winner  of  the  procurement  procedure,  but  they  include  also  the  funds  used  for 
administrative  expenses  necessary  to  perform  the  public  procurement  process.  Thus,  to 
perform a procurement procedure,  the necessary  costs for preparatory actions  should be 
considered,  as  for  example  costs  for  preliminary  research  and  comparing
35
,  in  order  to 
prepare necessary (technical and financial) requirements for the good, service or work, as 
well  as  the  necessary  administrative  costs,  as  for  example  salaries  of  the  employees 
engaged  in  preparing  the  procedure  from  the  planning  phase  to  the  signing  of  the 
contract, costs for printing or copying of documents, electric energy spent for this reason, 
etc.
36
  In  this  sense,  a  public  procurement  process  should  aim  at  the  “value  for  money” 
and efficacy not only of the funds in disposal for concluding the public contract, but also 
of the administrative expenses necessary to implement the procurement procedure.    
Cost control is a key issue in public (and private) procurement. Value for money remains 
the fore most objective associated with public procurement in most jurisdictions. Finding 
the appropriate trade-off point between cost and quality, and long and short term value, 
remains  a  project  for  individual  contracting  authorities  supported  by  national  policy. 
Broader  concepts  of  value  for  money  look  at  the  economic  impact  of  procurement  and 
ask  whether  it  is  sustainable.  There  are  a  number  of  ways  of  promoting  economic 
sustainability  in  procurement,  from  ensuring  that  contractors  are  financially  sound  and 
tax  compliant,  to  encouraging  competition  from  a  diverse  range  of  enterprises,  to 
assessing the effect which a public contract will have on local employment and wages
37

Looking  for  the  "best  value  for  money”  in  public  (and  private)  procurement,  while 
keeping  under  control  the  process  management  costs,  requires  several  important 
decisions. 
 
                                       
34
  See  S.  Arrowsmith  “Public  Procurement:  Basic  Concepts  and  the  Coverage  of  Procurement  Rules”, 
Public 
Procurement 
Regulation-an 
introduction, 
pg. 
5, 
Available 
on-line 
at 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pprg/documentsarchive/asialinkmaterials/publicprocurementregulationintrod
uction.pdf
. Retrieved on, 20.12.2014.   
35
  P.  Trepte  “Regulating  Procurement-  understanding  the  ends  and  means  of  public  procurement 
regulation”, Oxford University Press Inc., New York, 2004 (reprinted in 2006), pg. 122. 
36
 Taking into considerations these kinds of financial costs, some procurement regulations foresee that the 
economic  operators,  interested  to  participate  in  a  procurement  procedure,  should  pay  to  the  contracting 
authority  the  cost  of  copying  the  tender  documentation.  See  for  example  article  10  “Standard  tender 
documents” of the Decision of Council of Ministers No. 914, dated 29.12.2014 “On approval of the public 
procurement rules”. 
37
  See  A.  Semple  ‘A  practical  guide  to  public  procurement’,  Oxford  University  Press,  United  Kindom, 
2015, pg. x. 

Impact of European Union public procurement legislation  
on the Albanian public procurement system  
2015 
 
 
31 
 
An  example  of  a  decision  with  direct  impact  in  the  management  of  these  costs  is  to 
choose between the concentrated and decentralized procurement
38

The issue whether centralization or decentralization is more appropriate, usually rises up 
when  a  certain  organization  or  structure  has  reached  a  certain  granditude  and  /or 
geographical expansion. When organizations grow, local structures cost control becomes 
more  difficult;  undoubtedly  this  problem  is  solved  by  assigning  budgets  to  the 
decentralized  structures,  even  though  this  measure  does  not  necessarily  mean  efficient 
expenditures.  A  contracting  authority  can  benefit  from  economies  of  scale  by  buying 
their  requirements  in  bulk.  This  technique  is  appropriate  for  contracting  authorities 
operating in similar sectors or in neighboring locations. This is most likely to be the case 
for  products  used  from  day  to  day  where  the  various  purchasers  do  not  have  any  entity 
specific  or  differential  technical  requirements
39
.  Concentration  helps  to  considerably 
reduce the costs of purchase, mainly due to: 
 

 
Synergies  (product  of  economy  of  scale,  by  avoiding  duplication  of  efforts/work, 
through reduction of legal challenges); 
The  more  standardized  the  product/service,  the  bigger  the  advantage  of  contracting 
authorities to aggregate the request, as economic operators have the possibilities to make 
use of the economy of scale, by operating this way with a lower cost per unit
40

In public procurement, centralization may save also in the case of doubled costs, such as 
notice publication costs
41
 and other administrative costs. 
 

 
Increased expertise and exchange of know-how/resources  
Big  organizations  are  commonly  characterized  by  a  high  degree  of  expertise  of  human 
capital and produce at the same time a huge volume of information. Usually, the higher 
the  level  of  concentration,  the  more  information/know-how/data  is  shared  among 
procurement experts. Generally, sharing of information improves the efficacy through the 
use of up-to-date data/information, share of common problems and solutions. 
                                       
38
  According  to  the  Directive  2014/18/EC,  paragraph  15  of  the  Introduction  part  is  stated  that  “Certain 
centralized purchasing techniques  have been developed in  Member States. Several contracting authorities 
are  responsible  for  making  acquisitions  or  awarding  public  contracts/framework  agreements  for  other 
contracting authorities. In view of the large volumes purchased, those techniques help increase competition 
and streamline public purchasing…” See also article 11 of the above mentioned Directive and article 11 of 
the PPL.  
39
  P.  Trepte  “Regulating  Procurement-  understanding  the  ends  and  means  of  public  procurement 
regulation”, Oxford University Press Inc., New York, 2004 (reprinted in 2006), pg. 125. 
40
 Economies of scale emerge when the fix costs make up a considerable part of the production costs, i.e., 
of  the  costs  that  are  independent  from  production  scale.  Production  costs  are  composed  by  two 
components: fix costs and variable costs. The first component does not change through the production (or 
at  least  does  not  change  within  a  certain  production  interval),  while  the  second  increases  for  every 
additional unit of production. 
41
Publication of such notices in local  or international newspapers is done toward payments. According to 
the Albanian procurement legislation, the contract notice of the procedures above the high threshold should 
be published in an international newspaper. See article 38 of PPL. 

Impact of European Union public procurement legislation  
on the Albanian public procurement system  
2015 
 
 
32 
 
 

 
Minimization of opportunities for corruption 
Favoritism  and/or  corruption  may  also  happen  at  the  central  level.  However,  the  higher 
visibility  of  concentrated  purchase  makes  the  “blooming”  of  this  phenomenon  more 
difficult
42

 
1.2 Components of public procurement, scope of application and exclusions  
 
To create the conditions for a procurement procedure, there should exist at the same time 
the following four elements: 
 
1
 
The Contracting Authority (CA); 
2
 
The Public Fund (state budget) available; 
3
 
The need of the Contracting Authority for a public work, good or service
4
 
The economic operators. 
 
1.2.1. Contracting authority 
 
In  the  perspective  of  a  public  procurement  process,  a  contracting  authority  is  the  one 
which  run  the  process,  aiming  at  awarding  a  public  contract  for  supplies,  services,  or 
public works. The  modern  state  employs  a  wide  variety  of  institutional  forms  to  carry 
out  its functions; and this may make it difficult and uncertain to establish an appropriate 
boundary for rules that apply to “public  bodies” but not to the “private” ones, including 
defining  the  general  scope  of  administrative/public  bodies  for  states  that  adopt  a 
general  distinction  between  t h e   administrative/public  law  and  private law
43
.  
Nevertheless, once a body falls within the definition of a ‘contracting authority’, all of its 
purchases  of  goods,  works  and  services  will  be  subject  to  the  procedural  requirements, 
even  if  these  purchases  are  made  for  the  purposes  of  tasks  that  are  not,  or  even  mostly 
not,  in  the  general  interest
44
.  Once  covered  by  the  procurement  regulations  (the 
procurement  Directive,  or  a  national  procurement  law,  such  as  the  Albanian  case),  the 
authority is covered for all purchases within the definition of the given regulation. 
                                       
42
  According  to  the  2005  worldwide  study  on  corruption  entitled  “Resistance  to  corruption  in  the  public 
sector”, the international Consortium for Governmental Management of Finances (ICGMF) recommended 
a  series  of  measures  to  reduce  corruption,  including  the  measure  “to  cure  procurement  propense  to 
corruption by centralizing purchases”. ICGMF suggested that, whenever possible, to concentrate purchases 
in  order  to  reduce  the  opportunities  for  extra-bid  negotiation  or  other  forms  of  corruption  and  to  use 
electronic purchase, which reduce the freedom of actions with processes and limit personal interventions. 
43
  See  S.  Arrowsmith  “Public  Procurement:  Basic  Concepts  and  the  Coverage  of  Procurement  Rules”, 
Public 
Procurement 
Regulation-an 
introduction, 
pg. 
5, 
Available 
on-line 
at 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pprg/documentsarchive/asialinkmaterials/publicprocurementregulationintrod
uction.pdf
. Retrieved on, 20.12.2014.  
44
  See  Case  C-44/96  Mannesmann  Anlagenbau  Austria  AG  and  Others  v  Strohal  Rotationsdruck  GmbH 
(‘Mannesmann’) (1998) ECR I-73, paras 30-35.  

Impact of European Union public procurement legislation  
on the Albanian public procurement system  
2015 
 
 
33 
 
Anyway,  especially  in  the  case  of  a  body  governed  by  public  law,  the  status  of  a 
contracting authority can change over time as a result of a change of its functions
45
 or a 
change  in  its  legal  status
46
.  The  financing  of  the  contracting  authority  may  also  change 
over time
47
. These all have an effect on the inclusion of the body within the definition of 
the procurement rules (a Directive, or a national law, in case of Albania), and therefore it 
is not possible to say, once and for all, whether a body is covered or not covered by these 
rules.  
The  applicable  rules  on  public  procurement,  generally,  provide  for  the  definition  of  the 
“contracting authority”. So, for example, the Albanian public procurement law, provides 
in article 3, point 14 that the term ‘Contracting authorities’ (in the public sector) means 
all those entities  subject to  the  PPL for the execution of their public contracts.  Namely, 
the following: 
a. Constitutional institutions, other central institutions, independent central institutions 
and local governing units
b. Any bodies: 
(i)  Established  for  the  specific  purpose  of  meeting  needs  in  the  general  interest, 
not having an industrial or commercial character; 
(ii) Having legal personality; and 
(iii) Financed, for the most part, by the State, regional or local authorities, or other 
public bodies; or subject to management supervision by those bodies; or having an 
administrative,  managerial  or  supervisory  board,  more  than  half  of  whose 
members  are  appointed  by  the  State,  regional  or  local  authorities,  or  by  other 
public bodies; 
c. Associations formed by one or several of such authorities or one or several of such 
public bodies. 
The same definition is provided also by article 1, point 9 of the Directive 2004/18/EC
48

On  the  other  hand,  the  Directive  2014/24/EU  goes  further  with  its  definitions,  because 
                                       
45
  See  Case  C-470/99  Universale  –Bau  AG,  Bietergemeinschaft:  1)  Hinteregger  &  Söhne  Bauges  mbH 
Salzburg,  2)  ÖSTŰ-STETTIN  Hoch-und  Tiefbau  GmbH  v  Entsorgungsbetriebe  Simmering  GbmH 
(‘Univesale – Bau’) [2002] ECR I-11617.  
46
 See Case C-373/00 Adofl Truley GmbH v Bestattung Wien GmbH (‘Truley’) [2003] ECR I-1931.  
47
  See  Case  C-380/98  The  Queen  v  HM  Treasury,  ex  parte  The  University  of  Cambridge  (‘Cambridge’) 
[2000] ECR 8035.  
48
According  to  the  article  1/9  of  Directive  2004/18/EC  ‘Contracting  authorities’  means  the  State, 
regional  or  local  authorities,  bodies  governed  by  public  law,  associations  formed  by  one  or  several  of 
such authorities or one or several of such bodies governed by public law. 
A "body governed by public law" means anybody: 
(a) established for the specific purpose of meeting needs in the general interest, not having an industrial 
or commercial character; 
(b) having legal personality; and 
(c)  financed,  for  the  most  part,  by  the  State,  regional  or  local  authorities,  or  other  bodies  governed  by 
public  law;  or  subject  to  management  supervision  by  those  bodies;  or  having  an  administrative, 
managerial or supervisory board, more than half of whose members are appointed by the State, regional 
or local authorities, or by other bodies governed by public law. 

Impact of European Union public procurement legislation  
on the Albanian public procurement system  
2015 
 
 
34 
 
except  for  that  provided  from  the  Directive  2004/18/EC,  it  is  providing  also  for  the 
definitions  of  the  “central  government  authorities”  and  “sub-central  contracting 
authorities”
49
.  
The major distinction that must be made is between the two main categories of public or 
contracting authority, namely: 

 
state, regional or local authorities (‘public authorities’) 

 
bodies governed by public law 
 
1.2.1.1 Public authorities 
 
Public  authorities  are  defined  as  `state,  regional  or  local  authorities’.  This  definition 
covers  all  state  entities  and  not  only  the  executive  authority  of  the  state,  i.e.  state 
administrations and regional  or local  authorities. The term  `the state’ also  encompasses 
all the bodies that exercise legislative, executive and judicial powers
50
.  
In  the  Vlaamse  Raad  case
51
,  the  European  Court  of  Justice  (ECJ)  also  dismissed  the 
argument  that  the  procurement  rules  did  not  apply  to  legislative  bodies  because  of  the 
independence and supremacy of the legislative authority. The Court found that “the term 
‘the  State’  referred  to  by  the  provision  necessarily  encompasses  all  the  bodies,  which 
exercise legislative, executive and judicial powers…”.
52
 
The  definition  of  the  state  is  broad  and  the  ECJ  has  taken  a  particularly  functional 
approach.  It  thus  looks  more  at  the  actual  function  of  the  entity  concerned  than  at  the 
formal  categorization  that  the  entity  has  been  given  by  internal  law.  In  the  Beentjes 
case
53
,  the  awarding  authority  was  a  body  with  no  legal  personality  of  its  own,  whose 
functions  and  composition  were  governed  by  legislation  and  its  members  appointed  by 
the provincial executive of the province concerned. It was bound to apply rules laid down 
by  a  central  committee  established  by  royal  decree,  whose  members  were  appointed  by 
the Crown. The state ensured observance of the obligations arising out of measures of the 
committee  and  financed  the  public  works  contract  awarded  by  the  local  committee  in 
question. The ECJ held that the term `state’ must be interpreted in functional terms
54
. As 
a  result,  a  body  such  as  the  awarding  authority  –  whose  composition  and  functions  are 
                                       
49
 See Article 2 of the Directive 2014/24/EU 
50
  To  include  all  categories  of  state  institutions,  exercising  legislative,  executive,  or  judicial  powers, 
Albanian PPL has listed them as “constitutional institutions, other central institutions, independent central 
institutions and local governing units”. 
51
  Case  C-323/96  Commission  of  the  European  Communities  v  Kingdom  of  Belgium  (‘Vlaamse  Raad’) 
[1998] ECR I-5063. Under the national law on procurement, which had apparently not correctly transposed 
the Works Directive of the time, the rules applied only to the executive authority. 
52
 See Case C-323/96, Vlaamse Raad, ibid, at para 27. 
53
 Case 31/87 Gebroeders Beentjes BV v State of the Netherlands (‘Beentjes’) [1998] ECR 46 35. 
54
 The same position is expressed by ECJ in the Case C-360/96 Gemeente Arnhem and GemeenteRheden v 
BFI Holding BV (‘Arnhem’) [1998] ECR I-6821, in the para 62 of which has been found that “…the term 
‘Contracting Authority’, must be interpreted in functional terms and that, in view of the need, no distinction 
should  be  drawn  by  reference  to  the  legal  form  of  the  provisions  setting  up  the  entity  and  specifying  the 
needs it is to meet…”. 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling